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Showing 1 through 5 of 55 records.
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2008 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 101 words || 
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1. Marquez, Allissa., Scalora, Mario., Chang, Grace. and Schoeneman-Morris, Katherine. "Predictive Factors of Single Approach versus Intrusive Harassment Behaviors towards Legislators" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, FL, Mar 05, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229392_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The increasing demand for accurate threat assessment approaches has challenged researchers to discover reliable predictors of problematic behavior (Coggins, Pynchon, & Dvoskin, 1998). This study examined the ability of several risk factors (subject characteristics, contact characteristics, and thematic content) to accurately distinguish between stalking versus single approach behavior toward legislators. Stalking cases were more likely to contact multiple agencies, focus on target-related issues, use multiple methods of contact and less likely to evidence mental illness. A discriminant analysis revealed a model that correctly reclassified 71.4% of the overall sample, including 85% of single approach cases and 50% of stalking cases.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 103 words || 
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2. Marquez, Allissa. and Scalora, Mario. "Obsessive relational intrusion: Associations with emotion regulation and coping strategies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483172_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Limited research has been conducted on stalking since it was first criminalized in 1990. Only a handful of studies on clinically-relevant characteristics exist and most focus on DSM diagnoses, attachment abnormalities, and motivational typologies. This study sought to expand this knowledge by examining coping strategies as they relate to Obsessive Relational Intrusion (ORI), a concept included on the continuum of stalking related behaviors. Results reveal small-to-moderate correlations between strategies used after a social conflict and subcategories of ORI behaviors. Furthermore, results suggest that treatment should include processing of how traditionally positive strategies may be used to achieve more appropriate goals.

2012 - LRA 62nd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1487 words || 
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3. Pennington, Julie., Brock, Cynthia. and Oikonomidoy, Eleni. "Teacher Agency & Improvisation: Reading Instruction in an Age of Intrusive Federal Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 62nd Annual Conference, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, CA, Nov 28, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574452_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 206 words || 
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4. Maimon, David., Wilson, Theodore., Cukier, Michel., LaFree, Gary. and Lemieux, Anthony. "Think Before You Click! The Effect of a Cyber Awareness Campaign on Computer Network’s Reported Intrusion Alerts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p664934_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The relationship between computer users’ online routines and the volume of cybercrime against a network indicates that computer users may expose their networks to cyber attacks. In line with this view, we draw on the Routine Activities perspective and conduct an experiment aimed at understanding the effect of cyber awareness and computer network policy reminders (both electronic and non-electronic) on the volume of cybercrime attempts against a university network. In this experiment we choose eight representative residential dorms from a large university campus, each assigned to a specific treatment or control. Users within a dorm received either (1) electronic reminders regarding the official policy of network use, (2) awareness fliers concerning cybersecurity and university policy, (3) both the reminders and the awareness fliers, or (4) no intervention [control group]. To assess the effectiveness of the intervention on the volume of cybercrime attempts against the system we used Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) alert reports (an IPS is a security device that monitors malicious activity and reacts in real-time by blocking a potential intrusion) from a large university computer network to examine whether those dorms which received the experimental treatments also received fewer IPS alerts than the dorms in the control sample. Preliminary findings are reported and discussed.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11127 words || 
Info
5. Ma, Dali. "State Intrusion, Identity Conflict, and Radical Organizational Change at the Chinese Academy of Sciences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725999_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study suggests that formal organizational structure displays the configuration of organizational identity, and a strong state constrains organizations’ pursuit of distinctive identities. When the state pushed the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) to start businesses in the 1980s, it stirred organizational identity conflict: “Are we a scientific or business organization?” When the state was more willing to support research in the 1990s, CAS managed to develop scientific identity into its central identity. CAS-owned enterprises without research and development (R&D) experienced greater risks of discontinuation because they failed to exhibit the sacred scientific identity. The positive effect of having no R&D on the likelihood of discontinuation was stronger for enterprises with high levels of profits because they exhibited a salient yet profane business identity, and for enterprises in an institute where an elite group of scientists (Academicians) was more senior because these scientists were highly committed to scientific identity.

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