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2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Barnier, Robin. and Salfati, C. Gabrielle. "A Thematic Comparison of Serial Homicides Involving Sex Workers and Serial Homicides Involving Non-Sex Workers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1045358_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sex workers have a significantly higher chance of being the victim of serial homicide offenders than non-sex workers. Additionally, clearance rates for homicides of sex workers are far below overall homicide clearance rates, suggesting the need for a better understanding of these crimes and their perpetrators. The present study aimed to investigate this issue by examining serial homicides of sex workers and serial homicides of non-sex workers. Serial homicides were analyzed to see if there exist thematic differences in crime scene behaviors, victim choice, and offender characteristics between serial homicides of sex workers and serial homicides of non-sex workers. Results are discussed in the context of sex worker homicides in relation to other subtypes of homicide and implications for classification and linking serial crimes.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Hutchison, Brent. and Gibbs, Benjamin. "School-based Parental Involvement: Asset or Burden? Organizational Context and Perceptions of Involvement Across Three Schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122381_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues that outcomes of school-based parental involvement can be more clearly understood using toolkit theories of culture (Calarco 2014b) as well as theories of inhabited institutionalism (Hallett and Ventresca 2006), both of which can inform how embedded organizational contexts of schools guide social interactions through institutional expectations of school-based parental involvement, while meanings surrounding expectations of parental involvement are also constructed through local interactions. Using data from 129 interviews of school administrators, kindergarten teachers, volunteer leaders of parent teacher organizations (PTOs) and parents of kindergarteners across three distinct public elementary schools, we show that the meaning of what constitutes acceptable types and levels of school-based parental involvement varies widely depending on the embedded environment in which schools are situated and the institutional expectations surrounding whether or not parental involvement within the school is valued. Parents often evaluate their involvement levels more harshly within a school embedded in a predominantly white, upper-middle class community, leading to a “hyper-consciousness” of involvement as parents scramble to measure up to perceived teacher and administrator expectations, whereas parents within a school comprised of more working class and Latino families often evaluate their involvement as meeting or exceeding perceived teacher and administrator expectations. These subjective assessments of parental involvement both shape and are shaped by the value teachers and administrators place on parental involvement within school. These findings suggest that the role and effectiveness of school-based parental involvement in shaping student outcomes is largely situational and cannot be understood by parent characteristics alone.

2017 - ARNOVA's 46th Annual Conference Words: 98 words || 
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3. Robertsson, Karin., Hvenmark, Johan. and Karlsson, Magnus. "Changing Forms of Involvement in Socially Oriented CSOs? Mapping the Organizational Repertoire of Involvement in Four CSOs from 1996 to 2015" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ARNOVA's 46th Annual Conference, Amway Grand Plaza Hotel, Grand Rapids, Michigan, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1284946_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study set out to explore the organizational repertoire of involvement in four socially oriented CSOs in Sweden from 1996 to 2015. Data are drawn from a content analysis of organizations archived websites. Over time, tentative results indicate a looser connection between being a formal member and doing voluntary work for that same organization, a significant increase regarding forms of involvement categorized as voluntary work as well as giving and, a shift in terminology. Finally, in light of comparison to prior studies the authors suggest adding yet another empirical dimension to the organizational repertoire of involvement – attention.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7822 words || 
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4. Poladko, Tetyana. and Alleyne, Atnreakn. "Parental Involvement and the Racial State: How Hegemonic Discourse about Parental Involvement Maintains the Racial State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p566347_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the second half of the 20th century policy-makers, educators and scholars have been increasingly interested in the effects of school-based and home-based parental involvement on various children’s outcomes. As the nation is frantically trying to find solutions to or explain away its failure to provide millions of low-income and minority children in urban areas with high quality education, perceived lack of parental involvement both at home and in schools is increasingly seen as one of the main culprits of the educational crisis. As a result, many poor and working-class parents develop a perpetual feeling of guilt and inferiority due to their inability to perform a role of a “good” parent, as it is constructed by the school officials.
In this paper I interrogate the concept of parental involvement and discuss how parental involvement has been defined and operationalized among policy-makers and within the academic community. I contend that parental involvement in the academy is very narrowly understood.

2008 - UCEA Annual Convention Words: 108 words || 
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5. Young, Michelle. and Carpenter, Bradley. "Preparing Educational Leaders to Build Transformative Communities of Involvement: The Importance of Trust Preparing Educational Leaders to Build Transformative Communities of Involvement: The Importance of Trust" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Buena Vista Palace Hotel and Spa, Orlando, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275393_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: This article is drawn from a qualitative study of the role that school building leaders play in building parent and community involvement in their schools. The article focuses on four of the principals involved in the study who, with their students, staff, parents, and other community members, developed inclusive, meaningful, and transformative communities of involvement. The article delineates the contours of transformative communities of involvement within a discussion of five models of involvement. Subsequently, the beliefs that appeared to support the leaders work to develop and sustain such communities are examined along with a rich discussion of the role that trust played in their efforts and success.

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