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2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 24 pages || Words: 19 words || 
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1. Saeidi, Shirin. "Iran’s Silent Sexual Revolution during the Iran-Iraq War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p501350_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Feminist scholars have long argued that nationalism undermines women’s position in negotiating their rights with the nation-state. I explore the crossroads between nationalism and feminist claim-making during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-88) by creating an eclectic archive that includes over 200 interviews with women and men located in different sites in post-1979 Iran.

On the basis of this empirical evidence, I argue that women’s participation in nationalist movements can enhance their capacity for implementing feminist visions during intense political violence. At a more conceptual level, this paper provides alternative linkages between nationalism and feminism at a time of war. I begin by demonstrating how the emotions engendered by war strengthened women’s desires and abilities to reconstruct polities via their own bodies. Next, it will be illustrated how application of this form of feminist agency undermined the traditional emphasis on spatial and social segregation in expressions of nationalism.

Lastly, the processes of masculinization and feminization at wartime will be considered. Re-establishing the boundaries of these socially defined constructs, this feminist conceptualization changed the nation’s perception of femininity and masculinity. Subsequently, it remade notions and enactments of nationhood within political communities and families.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 16 pages || Words: 8972 words || 
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2. Khan, Saira. "Iran-US Protracted Conflict and Iran's Nuclear Ambition" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178705_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The issue of Iran's nuclear weapons program has come to the forefront of international security concerns since 2000. In the recent past, Iran has admitted to having uranium enrichment program, alarming the international community, especially the United States. Its weapons drive has been examined by scholars and policy-makers and most believes that the country is motivated to acquire nuclear weapons for security purposes. While this remains the primary driving force, no one has examined why Iran, in the absence of a hostile Iraq after Saddam Hussein?s rule, still chooses to keep its nuclear weapons option alive and in fact remains more focused on the weapons program. Thus, this paper addresses the question: what drives Iran to relentlessly move on with its nuclear weapons program in a less-hostile regional environment? I argue that although prestige?both regional and international?is a salient variable in Iran?s nuclear drive, its hostility with the United States remains the major causal factor for its proliferation activities. Iran?s protracted conflict with the United States started since the end of the Shah period and the Islamic revolution in the country in 1979. During this period, Iran?s leaders perceived the United States as the principal enemy of the Islamic states which supported their main enemy-Israel. Thus, in addition to having two protracted conflicts since the late 1940s and early 1950s with Israel and Iraq respectively, Iran developed a new protracted conflict with the US in 1979. Since then Iran had three enemies?Iraq, Israel, and the US?for the next 27 years. Although Iraq and Israel?s nuclear weapons programs alarmed Iran and the Islamic Republic became anxious to develop a deterrent capability against Iraq with whom it fought one of the longest wars in the region, and Israel, whose existence in the Middle East Iran denies, the pace of its nuclear weapons program was relatively slow till 2000. With the US administration taking aggressive foreign policies towards Iran since 2000, the latter?s security concern intensified. The Bush administration?s declaration of Iran as part of the ?axis of evil? states severely threatened and humiliated Iran; the threat exacerbated with the administration?s war on Iraq on the pretext that it was in possession of weapons of mass destruction. A society that was and still is split on many of the important domestic issues including democratization, modernization, and westernization, the Iranians remained united on the issue of nuclear weapons acquisition after the war on Iraq. US? decision to attack Iraq without the approval of the United Nations proved that in the absence of a nuclear deterrent capability, Iran would soon be in the same position as Iraq and would be the US? next target in the Middle East for being one of the ?axis of evil? states. Consequently, Iran became relentless in its drive to acquire nuclear weapons and boldly announced its decision to enrich uranium so that the US is not confused about its possession of the nuclear capability. Improved and non-aggressive US policies towards Iran, which can be instrumental to ending the prolonged Iran-US conflict, can convince Iran to renounce its nuclear weapons ambition.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 190 words || 
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3. Kazemzadeh, Masoud. "U.S.-Iran Confrontation: Analyzing Iran’s Foreign Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p502986_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Iran is ruled by an oligarchy composed of fundamentalist clerics and fundamentalist laypersons. The oligarchy is divided by social class, policy, and personal ambition for power. One of the primary issues dividing the oligarchy revolves around policy towards the United States. The substantive policies include the nuclear program, Israel-Palestinian conflict, and regional influence. The policy fight between accommodationists and confrontationists predates Obama’s presidency. Some confrontationists (e.g., Supreme Leader Khamenei and President Ahmadinajed) do not oppose negotiations with the U.S. if the Obama administration would acquiesce to the demands of the Iranian leadership. Khamenei prefers to contain American power in the region, while Ahmadinejad believes a roll-back of American hegemony is possible. The accomodationists (e.g., Ayatollah Rafsanjani, former president Khatami) argue that bellicose policies unnecessarily endanger the survival of the regime. This paper presents the policies of the top members of the oligarchy. It analyzes the alternative policy options (détente, confrontation, roll-back, stalling), which have been available to the Supreme Leader, as well as the consequences of these options. This paper discusses why the Supreme Leader chose the stalling option as tactic and containment of American power as his grand strategy.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9684 words || 
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4. Calhoun, Lindsay. "One Cannot Not Communicate (Unless You are the US and Iran): An Interactionist Perspective on the Foreign Policy Dilemmas Between the US and Iran" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p255833_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Utilizing Watzlawick, Bavelas, and Jackson's interactionist approach to human communication, I analyze the foreign policy issues plaguing the situation between the US and Iran. I end the paper with a discussion of possible interventions in the dysfunctional system of interactions that characterizes US foreign policy with Iran.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 110 words || 
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5. De Leon, Manuel. "The Sanctions against Iran and Iran's self-inflicted economic wounds." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 06, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1092893_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many scholars argue that the U.S. led sanctions against Iran were effective, because they forced Iran to negotiate its nuclear ambitions in exchange for a relaxation of the sanctions. However, we argue that although the sanctions may have caused serious economic problems to Iran, most of Iran's economic troubles are self-inflicted, the result of decades of faulty economic policies. Some of those problems are structural, typical of a welfare state with a centralized economy and populist policies. Some of those problems are directly related to mismanagement of the economy by successive Presidents and governments. And many of those economic problems became apparent long before 2010 when the sanctions were expanded.

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