Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 184 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 37 - Next  Jump:
2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 279 words || 
Info
1. Mastin, Teresa., Blake, Ken., Wyatt, Robert. and Fan, David. "Annus Mirabilis, Annus Horibilis: How Press Coverage of Terrorism, the Iraqi Situation, and Wall Street Scandals Affect Confidence in the Military, the Government, and Major Corporations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper fits with this year's AAPOR conference theme of trust by examining the impact of mass media coverage on trust in the military, the Executive Branch of the U.S. government, and major companies. Trust in these institutions has recently undergone dramatic changes as seen in a set of long standing General Social Survey (GSS) confidence questions asked by a variety of polling organizations. Key reasons for the changes include press coverage of the toppling of the Taliban government in Afghanistan for the military, the handling of the war-on-terror and Saddam Hussein of Iraq for the Executive Branch, and
the collapse of Enron, their accountants, and other high-flying companies for major corporations.
The impact of coverage of these and other crucial events is assessed by predicting time trends of survey questions on the three types of confidence. The predictions will be made from 1977 to shortly before the AAPOR conference using relevant coverage in the Associated Press and the Washington Post. This quarter-century time period is chosen because both survey results and news coverage are available from the Nexis electronic database for the entire time period.
The study builds on Fan, Wyatt, and Keltner (2001, The Suicidal Messenger: How Press Reporting Affects Public Confidence in the Press, the Military, and Organized Religion, Communication Research, 26:826-852), which succeeded in predicting the same confidence questions asked of the press, the military, and organized religion for a shorter time period. For both the present study and earlier one, the press is analyzed by computer using the InfoTrend method, and the modeling is performed using the ideodynamic computation which overcomes important problems inherent to autoregressive models.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9991 words || 
Info
2. Walgrave, Stefaan. "Transnational Movements and National Opportunities: The Case of the Worldwide Anti Iraqi War Protest on February 15th, 2003" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p60792_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 9705 words || 
Info
3. Dutta-Bergman, Mohan. and Brockus, Susan. "Television coverage of Operation Iraqi Freedom: The frames that made news" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14734_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Extant research on the media coverage of the Gulf War demonstrates that the media tend to reflect the political ideologies of the mother nation, actively participating in the generation of political support for national policy. A large number of studies on news reports of the Gulf War pointed out that the media constructed the war as a military operation, highlighting military strategies and the triumph of technology, whereas the casualties of the war were omitted. More than a decade after the Gulf War, the United States and Iraq engaged again as key stakeholders in Operation Iraqi Freedom. This article examines the frames present in the media coverage of Operation Iraqi Freedom based on qualitative and quantitative analyses of the war coverage on CNN and Fox. Hypotheses also are tested regarding the favorability of specific frames toward key stakeholders.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 16189 words || 
Info
4. Morgan, Forrest. "Shock and Awe: Its Origins, Its Role in Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Why It Did Not Work... or Did It?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p70984_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On the eve of the U.S. led invasion of Iraq, the expression shock and awe captured media attention in the United States and Britain. Statements by American leaders seemed to corroborate descriptions of the war plan provided by unnamed Pentagon sources fanning public expectations that the coalition would mount a massive air bombardment and rapid ground assault to force Baghdad's prompt capitulation. Five days into the war, however, with no indication that Iraqi leaders were interested in surrender, journalists began asking why shock and awe had not worked. This paper evaluates the concept of shock and awe as a foundation for military strategy. It briefly examines the evolution of theories advocating shock-based strategies and investigates how such thinking influenced plans for the invasion of Iraq. It then assesses how well the coalition's strategy worked and draws implications regarding the efficacy of shock attacks in future conflicts.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 27 pages || Words: 5816 words || 
Info
5. Jones, Nathan. "Deterring the Iraqi Insurgency as a Market Entry/Exit Game" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180900_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper is a policy analysis of the decision to disband the Iraqi security services and the role it played in the birth of many Iraqi insurgencies. The decision has been heavily criticized for fueling the insurgencies and dismantling institutions that were not loyal to the Baath party but were necessary for the post-war governance of Iraq. Those most heavily involved in the decision (Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Bremer) argue that the announcement of the disbandment of the Iraqi security services in May of 2003 was an official rubberstamp on the de facto situation of an Army that had entirely deserted. Their critics argue twofold. First, the Iraqi Army suffered massive desertions because the coalition army was too small to secure the Iraqi military units intact. Second, the Iraqi army could have been reconstituted had the coalition acted quickly and decisively. Thanks to recently released statements from critical retired generals, Paul Bremer?s book, and other primary source materials released by those involved in the decision, a picture of why the much criticized choice was made has begun to appear. The Rumsfeld Doctrine of a small and technologically-advanced force has proven effective in war-fighting, but too small for nation-building. The failure to govern large areas of Iraq created a market for security that could be filled by those with a comparative advantage in violence, former soldiers. Borrowing from economics literature on autarky, I intend to assess the decision to disband the Iraqi security services and its impact upon the birth of the insurgency as a synthetically created market for security.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 37 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy