Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,661 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 333 - Next  Jump:
2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 31 pages || Words: 10291 words || 
Info
1. Balci, Tamer. "From nationalization of Islam to Islamization of nation: Clash of Islam and secular nationalism in the Middle East" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254233_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper concentrates on the interaction of Islam and secular nationalism in the modern Middle East. Although the political power of Islam diminished with the rise of nationalism, it largely remained as a strong social force in the Middle East. While several Muslim political leaders spent efforts to create secular state structures, they still relied on the power of Islam for many practical reasons. From the 1920s on, the Middle East states aimed to take Islam under state control. Islam was taken under control so that secular nationalism could be initiated smoothly. However, based on the political conditions after WWII, the place of Islam in the Middle East was reevaluated by almost every Islamic state so that it could be used to promote the national interests. State control of Islam could be achieved only if Islam was nationalized through state propaganda and public education systems. Throughout the Middle East several Muslim states initiated projects to nationalize Islam. In this paper, I propose that the Muslim states’ desire to use Islam for their political interests paved the way for the rise of political Islam. What were the conditions that forced the political leaders to appeal the socio-political power of Islam? How the projects to nationalize Islam were carried out in the Middle East? Along with answering these questions, I will conclude my paper by answering two crucial questions: Why did the nationalization of Islam fail? Did the failure of these projects cause further Islamization of the Middle East.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 12559 words || 
Info
2. Bardhan, Soumia. "Islamism to Post-Islamism: The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood’s Challenge of Marrying an Islamic Ethos With Democratic Ideals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p716571_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This essay offers an ideological analysis of the discourse of the Islamist Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood (MB) in its official English-language website, Ikhwanweb.com, between 2005 and 2010—years preceding the Egyptian uprising of January 2011. The purpose was to examine the ideology manifest in the rhetoric and uncover the instrumental function the rhetoric serves. Analysis portrayed a qualitative shift in the Egyptian MB ideology—Islamism to post-Islamism. The rhetoric, through dialectical tensions, manifested the incertitude and flux associated with this shift. The shift and flux were evident in the MB’s maneuvers and discourses during its political centrality in Egypt post-Mubarak. The instrumentality of the rhetoric lay in challenging Western societies’ monolithic understanding of Islamism—undemocratic and radical—and criticizing Western agents’ support of dictatorial regimes in the Arab world, thereby shedding light on the hypocrisy of the discourse of democracy promotion in Arab, Muslim societies.

Key words: Ideology, Islamism/Political Islam, Rhetorical Criticism

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 333 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy