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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Aoki, Sayaka. and Brassard, Marla. "Understanding Isolated and Non-isolated Victims of Peer Victimization in Middle School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959461_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding of the differences between isolated and non-isolated victims of peer victimization (PV) in middle school, in order to better understand the diverse mechanisms underlying the development of PV and to apply such knowledge to intervention programs for different types of victims. To meet this purpose, two research questions (RQ) were proposed. The first RQ examined how the relationship between self-reported PV and its risk factors/concurrent correlates (individual characteristics, such as peer-reported aggression, shyness, as well as self-reported internalizing problems and social skills, and patterns in peer relationships, such as peer-reported rejection by boys/girls and likelihood of having a mutually liked peer) are different depending on the level of peer-rated isolation in the 7th grade. The second RQ investigated factors associated with a decrease in peer victimization in the following year (8th grade), and examined whether such factors are different for isolated victims and non-isolated victims.

To address these research questions, secondary analyses were conducted on the data gathered by Brassard and colleagues in 3-year longitudinal survey conducted with the entire cohort of students in two middle schools in a lower income, racially heterogeneous urban school district. Participants were 640 students whose PV and isolation data in the 7th grade were available. PV was measured using the Social Experience Questionnaire (Crick & Glotpeter, 1996). Isolation was calculated based on peer nomination on an item, "play alone," from the Revised Class Play (Masten, Morison, & Pellegrini, 1985).

The results of the analyses indicated that non-isolated victims were not as different from isolated victims as expected. However, isolated victims and non-isolated victims were found to be two distinct groups of victims confronted with different challenges. Isolated victims, specifically isolated victimized boys, had poorer peer relationship patterns, including higher rejection by boys and girls, and lower likelihood of having a mutually-liked peer, while non-isolated victims suffered more from internalizing problems. Meanwhile, some similarities were found between these two types of victims; both of them are less shy and have fewer social skills compared to the non-victimized counterparts. PV was not significantly related to aggression for either isolated participants or non-isolated participants (see Table 1).

This study also identified possible individual characteristics that are related to a decrease in PV in a following year. Shyness was associated with escape from victimization for both non-isolated victims and isolated victims as was low internalizing problems for isolated victims (see Figure 1).

These findings have implications for practices in school and clinical settings, including the importance of social skill training as an attempt to prevent adolescents from suffering from PV, and prioritization of clinical services for isolated victims to reduce their internalizing problems. This study also suggested some directions for future studies, including comparing isolated victims and non-isolated victims in more diverse aspects of peer relationships (e.g., popularity and friends’ characteristics) , a more comprehensive analysis for the relationship between shyness and PV, and the identification of social skills that are beneficial for different types of victims.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 7325 words || 
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2. York, Erin. and Waite, Linda. "Social Isolation and Health Among Older Adults: Assessing the Contributions of Objective and Subjective Isolation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184840_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A great deal of research indicates that various forms of social isolation have damaging effects on health. However, conceptualizations of social isolation vary widely. Research usually does not differentiate among the effects of various types of isolation or attempt to assess their respective contributions to health outcomes (House 2001). We distinguish between two main forms of social isolation: 1) objective isolation (i.e., physical separation from others); and 2) subjective isolation (i.e., feelings of loneliness, emotional distance, or lack of support from others). We use numerous indicators of social connectedness from a new population-based study to construct scales of objective and subjective social isolation among older adults, for whom isolation is thought to be more common and more damaging to health. We find that both forms of isolation independently decrease self-rated physical health. With respect to mental health, however, the effect of objective isolation appears to operate through the strong negative impact of subjective social isolation. We suggest further research to elucidate the mechanisms through which these different forms of social isolation affect health.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Pages: 17 pages || Words: 5434 words || 
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3. Hetou, Ghaidaa. "Isolating Syria Strategy: Is it Isolating America in the Middle East?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p310949_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Optimizing the inclusive and reengaging theme of the “New Middle East” does entail a reassessment of isolation policies. An isolating Syria strategy has emboldened Syria’s regional middle power alliances while rendering US foreign policy maneuvers con

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 11 pages || Words: 5378 words || 
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4. Weiss, Robert. "Retirement and Social Isolation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32051_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Entering into retirement requires that one leave behind the community of one's work. Many retirees for a time have membership in no other community: no other network of people with whom there is a sense of alliance and with whom interests are shared. The absence of membership in a community makes for feelings of marginality and for a restless boredom. Those who live alone, but also those among the married who are their own through the day, are especially likely to experience social isolation in the early days of their retirement. Cases are presented in the paper that exemplify the nature of social isolation. Cases are also presented that suggest ways in which the repair of social isolation can be achieved.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5382 words || 
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5. Offer, Shira. "Social Isolation among Low-Income Families in the Post-Welfare Reform Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103262_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using data from the Three-City Study, this study indicates that social isolation among low-income populations is a more common phenomenon than what scholars suggested several decades ago. Six percent of this sample of predominantly minority poor and near-poor families living in urban disadvantaged neighborhoods reported both receiving and providing little or no social support at all. A multivariate analysis of the individual and contextual factors associated with social isolation provides support to the resource hypothesis, according to which participation in exchange systems of support is contingent on individuals’ economic and other means. Specifically, results indicate that living below the poverty line, a low level of education, and immigrant status, were all associated with an increased likelihood of social isolation. The implications of lacking social support for family functioning and wellbeing in the post-welfare reform era are discussed.

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