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Showing 1 through 5 of 409 records.
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2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 189 words || 
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1. Kim, Mijin. "Crowded Jails, Empty Courts?: A Historical Analysis of Crowding Litigation and Jail Populations in Large and Small Jails" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278720_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Federal and state consent decrees once served as a common check on jail crowding, monitoring jail conditions and requiring reductions in population (or new construction). Although the nature of court-orders tended to be concentrated on overcrowding issues, they began to address other aspects of jail conditions in the 1980s. But Supreme Court rulings and the Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA) brought increased deference to jailers and the era of federal and state court action to curb overcrowding has largely ended, especially in smaller places where jails are still growing rapidly. Due to a lack of scholarly attention, it is especially unclear what specific constitutional violations propagated over time in small jails. Drawing on data from the Census and Survey of Jails from 1983 to 2013, this study examines the prevalence, content, and correlates of court violations between small and large jails. One of the main findings of this study is that the scrutiny of jail conditions through court oversight has decreased almost 90% since the 1980s regardless of jail size. Given the high incarceration rates in jails, moribund court oversight is hazardous for those who are behinds the bars.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 204 words || 
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2. Siegel, Jane., Napolitano, Laura., Bodrog, Mark., Hackman, Matthew. and Stone, Brenna. "Visiting Mom or Dad in Jail: A Comparison of Child-Parent Visitation in Male and Female Jails" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030958_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: With growing evidence that parental imprisonment can have deleterious consequences for children, efforts to mitigate harmful effects have recently increased. Many believe that maintaining contact during incarceration is important to preserving parent-child relationships, so identifying barriers to visits is important to devising strategies to facilitate such contact. As part of an effort initiated by a citizen task force working with the Philadelphia Prison System to examine visiting conditions for children, we initiated a survey of visitors. It explored visitor experiences with current policies and procedures and their views on potential changes in visitation practices under consideration. Subsequent to this research, a similar survey with incarcerated adults was undertaken. In this paper, we discuss the results of research completed to date with a sample of visitors and jailed adults, with particular attention to differences in children’s visitation to male and female facilities. Results focus on examining the frequency of children visiting their mother or father, challenges to child-parent visitation and attitudes about the propriety of children visiting a jailed parent. Concerns associated with child visitation expressed by survey respondents, based on open-ended questions, will be presented to help explain differences in the likelihood of children visiting mothers compared to fathers.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 107 words || 
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3. Bruns, Julie. and Manis, Jennifer. "The State of a Midwest Jail: Analysis of Admissions in Projecting Future Jail Population Growth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 13, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p203630_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: This study involves a comparative analysis of the demographics of a jail population on a single day (any given day in a jail) in 1999 and 2006 (seven year time period). Has the change in demographics impacted the capacity levels in the jail? Data will be presented on inmate gender, charge type, charge status, and bond type in order to determine what types of offenders are behind bars in these temporary facilities. This research provides a prescription for change to jail administrators nationwide who face the dilemma of either streamlining the process between the courts and jails, adding more beds through expansion, or building new detention centers.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Pages: 1 pages || Words: 129 words || 
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4. Meeks, Daryl. "Doing Jail Time: The Socialization Process of a County Jail Environment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p125630_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The socialization process that occurs within a custodial environment has primarily been examined through the lens of the prison inmate. However, largely ignored in this analysis of the development of inmate behavior has been the socialization process that actually begins with incarceration in the local county jail system. Interestingly, current research in this area has ignored the socialization process and the custodial acculturation experience of the jail officers tasked with guarding the inmates housed in the jail system.
This paper will examine the socialization process that occurs within the county jail system, how this socialization process effects the acculturation of the jail officer, and the social and criminal justice policy polemic posed by this jail socialization process.

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