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2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7607 words || 
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1. Perreault, Gregory., Jenkins, Joy., Swasy, Alecia. and Perreault, Mildred. "“Mrs. Jesus?” A Hegemonic Press Love Affair With Jesus the Bachelor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Protestant normativity is the dominant mode of the American press (Underwood, 2002). This study analyzes the recent case of the ancient papyrus scrap where Jesus addresses his “wife.” The U.S. news coverage of this case was examined using a discourse analysis to identify the dominant ideological packages, as modeled by Lee (2002). The trends in coverage support the idea of a Protestant hegemony, suppressing the idea of a married Jesus in support of a more traditional presentation.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 28 pages || Words: 9181 words || 
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2. Weissinger, Sandra. "For the love of Jesus, for the love of money: Black churches and their struggle to navigate Wal-Mart Stores, dignity at work, and social justice related activism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p239585_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Wal-Mart has been accused of: violating labor laws; providing pay and benefits that do not allow workers to escape poverty; and discriminating against workers in terms of hiring, promotion, and occupational duties. Conversely, the company has been praised for: being the largest private employer in the United States; giving donations to community groups neighboring their stores; and having affordable prices. This project takes place in two Christian church communities where leadership has published very different opinions about Wal-Mart stores.
I seek to examine how members of fundamental nondenominational Christian communities use their religious ideologies to navigate social problems such as inequality at work, environmental and institutional racism, violence, underemployment and unemployment. Using ethnographic methods, I will analyze how congregation members talk about Wal-Mart, work, and social problems. I hope to illuminate the various ways religious socialization, race, class, gender, age, geographic location, and other categories of difference work together to shape one’s perceptions and actions towards social problems and community needs. Often, studies of black churches fail to: acknowledge church members’ relationships to the communities in which their churches are housed; compare and contrast congregation’s views and activities across rural and urban geographic locations; and provide rich ethnographic descriptions of more than one congregation. Addressing these gaps as well as communities’ understanding of Wal-Mart stores is the aim of this study.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 26 pages || Words: 13695 words || 
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3. Bettiza, Gregorio. "“Making the World Safe for Jesus”: Mapping the Christian Right’s Ideology on America’s Liberal Interventionist Grand Strategy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414462_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper seeks to map the secular and religious ideologies that underpin America’s grand strategy of liberal interventionism. It reviews much of the existing literature highlighting how secular actors across a domestic political spectrum from left to right have formed a foreign policy consensus around the necessity for an activist ‘Secular Wilsonianism’ aiming at promoting liberal values through military interventions abroad. While the end of the Cold War has witnessed the triumph of secular liberalism, the post-1989 world is also defined by the worldwide resurgence of religion and religious ideologies. Politicoreligious actors have come to the fore in many domestic contexts and one such movement, the Christian Right in the United States, has increasingly sought to influence America’s foreign policy according to its religiously inspired ideology. The paper argues that the Christian Right has developed its own form of ‘Religious Wilsonianism’ aiming at “making the world safe for Jesus” which has overlapped with the muscular Wilsonianism of its secular counterparts. This has lead to the fusion of otherwise incompatible domestic secular and religious worldviews which, through foreign policy coalitions between Religious and Secular Wilsonians, have given rise to the liberal interventionist paradigm.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7117 words || 
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4. Hinderaker, Amorette. "I Hope They Call Me on a Mission: Assimilation into the Missionary System of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368662_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This exploratory study examines how young men experienced assimilation into the missionary system of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Within the context of a theoretical framework of organizational assimilation, qualitative methodologies explore the experiences of four active, full-time missionaries. Results suggest that institutionalized and prolonged periods of anticipatory socialization provide newcomers with reasoning tools that are used to overcome roadblocks to metamorphosis.

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 495 words || 
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5. Saldaña-Portillo, María Josefina. "“Though they be outside the faith of Jesus Christ”: Apprehending the Indian in Spanish Colonialism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417387_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: While faith in the Enlightenment project, and specifically “the rights of man,” dims in aftermath of 19th, 20th and 21st century colonialism, genocide, and war, it nevertheless behooves us to revisit the origins of the concept of the human in Europe if we stand any chance of revising the concept. Although Spain is often left out of the history of Enlightenment thought, with the discovery of the Americas, the Spanish Crown was forced to adjudicate the boundaries of humanity—and to determine the humanity of its newfound subjects accordingly—from the very onset of the sixteenth century, earlier than any other imperial European power. By 1537, Pope Paul III had already issued the Papal Bull “Sublimis Deus” affirming the humanity of the Native Americans. While the Papal Bull did not succeed in ending the enslavement of indigenous peoples by conquistadores, it nevertheless stated clearly that “the said Indians and all other people who may later be discovered by Christians, are by no means to be deprived of their liberty or the possession of their property, even though they be outside the faith of Jesus Christ; …nor should they be in any way enslaved; should the contrary happen, it shall be null and have no effect.” This Papal Bull suggests an alternate history of Enlightenment in Europe, a Catholic Enlightenment, if you will. Indeed, debate on the condition and treatment of Indians raged in the Spanish Court throughout the century, culminating in the debate between Father Bartolomé de Las Casas and theologian Juan Gines de Sepúlveda in 1555 in Valladolid, Spain, which precipitated changing of the laws of conquest. In order to reexamine the historical and theoretical record on the European Enlightenment, then, I explore the 1555 debate between Las Casas and Sepúlveda on the enslavement of Indians. Within this critical polemic an alternative model of the human appears, which illuminates how Catholicism’s legitimations of colonialism qualify our understandings of Enlightenment humanism. Conversely, the archive on this debate also harbors the traces of indigenous participation and agency within this “other” Enlightenment—traces which bespeak the model, proposed by Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt, that conceives modernity as a dynamic relation between colony and colonial informed by racial differentiation. Thus, we can ask: How did the evolution of alternative model of the human shape indigenous identity in the Americas, and, more importantly, how did autonomous indigenous practice predicate what Spaniards like Las Casas came to recognize as human? Moreover, how might such a consideration advance transnational scholarship on contemporary modes of indigenous identity north and south of the Rio Grande? This rich history needs to be mined for what it might offer us for contesting the terms of European Enlightenment from within. In my paper for our panel “Repairing the Human,” I revisit this early history of theorizing the human through the confrontation with racial difference, as the Spanish case makes it quite evident that humanist philosophy evolves hand and hand with colonial governmentality.

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