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2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 149 words || 
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1. McCall, Patricia., Parker, Karen. and Dollar, Cindy. "Jobs, Jobs, Jobs. Or Poverty? The Jobs, Poverty, Social Isolation Nexus with Neighborhood Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1139770_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As the U.S. recovers from economic recession, job availability and growth take on new meaning. Certainly the presidential candidates in this election cycle have highlighted the importance of job growth to the U.S. economy and future economic success. In this paper, we return to Wilson’s three major books (The Declining Significance of Race, The Truly Disadvantaged, When Work Disappears) to explore the role of work and what happens when it disappears in communities across the United States. Specifically, we examine conceptually and empirically the potential interconnections between jobs, poverty and social isolation in the study of community level crime. Using data from the National Neighborhood Crime Study (NNCS), which contains community level crime and socio-demographic indicators for over 9,500 census tracts in 91 large cities, we explore how multiple indicators of work, and its interconnections with poverty and social isolation, contribute to varying crime rates across areas.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9889 words || 
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2. Klainot-Hess, Elizabeth. "Good Jobs for Whom? Class, Job Reward Orientation and Job Satisfaction Among Contingent Faculty" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379403_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The casualization of the economy has created contingent positions not just in low-wage, low-status work, but also in occupations that were historically prestigious, highly paid, and secure. This can be seen in the academy, where contingent positions such as lecturers and adjunct professors now make up over 2/3 of faculty positions. While these positions provide high intrinsic rewards, studies find that they are lacking in extrinsic rewards. Are these jobs good or bad jobs, and for whom? Levels of job satisfaction among contingent faculty vary greatly. To investigate what could lead different individuals in the same job to have radically different levels of job satisfaction, I conducted interviews with 100 contingent faculty. Some scholars argue that variation in job satisfaction is due to job characteristics, but this doesn’t explain within job variation. Other scholars argue that variations in job satisfaction arise from different job reward orientations, but this is not the only area in which contingent faculty vary. In my study I found that job reward orientation was a major source of variation, but the class position of contingent faculty - which was sometimes mediated by a higher-income spouse - was also a major source of variation. These two sources of variation also intersected in important ways. Contingent faculty with an intrinsic orientation who were in an advantaged class location experienced the greatest job satisfaction, while contingent faculty with an extrinsic orientation who were in a disadvantaged class location experienced the lowest job satisfaction. Class location also moderated the effects of job reward orientation and affected how these rewards were interpreted and valued. As the casualization of the economy pushes highly educated people into class-mixed and contingent jobs, it is important to understand if these are good jobs for only the most advantaged individuals.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 143 words || 
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3. Lambert, Eric., Elechi, O. Oko. and Otu, Smart. "An Exploratory Study of the Relationship of Job Stress, Job Involvement, and Job Satisfaction with the Life Satisfaction of Nigerian Prison Staff" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1334017_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Staff are a critical resource for prisons across the world. While a growing number of studies of prison staff have explored the antecedents of job stress, job involvement, and job satisfaction, very few studies have examined how job stress, job involvement, and job satisfaction affect the life satisfaction of prison staff. Moreover, the limited past studies on prison staff life satisfaction have all been conducted in the U.S. The current study attempted to fill this empirical void by examining the effects of job stress, job involvement, and job satisfaction on the life satisfaction of staff at a Nigerian prison. Based on the spillover theory, these work variables will spill over and affect the life satisfaction. In a multivariate Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression analysis, job stress had significant negative effects on life satisfaction, and job involvement and job satisfaction had significant positive effects.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4825 words || 
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4. Akiyoshi, Mito. and Tsutsui, Junya. "Quitting a Job: The Effect of Job Characteristics on Job Separation of University Educated Women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p506684_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The university advancement rate for Japanese women rose between 1992 and 2009 from 17% to 44%. The increase in higher education participation does not necessarily translate into women’s greater labor force attachment. The present study examines the factors related to job separation of Japanese female workers with university-level education. Data was collected from 1,407 women aged 28 to 47 years who achieved higher education qualifications. The focus of the study is on separation from the first job after completion of education. Quitting the first job is an event experienced by the majority of highly-educated female workers in Japan. In our data, 1,047 women (77.8%) have experienced a job separation. The average duration of the first job is 4.15 years. Our research problem is why highly educated female workers experience a job separation. Prior research has suggested that marriage and childbirth are key factors in first job separation. Drawing on the literature, we postulate that factors not directly related to marriage and childbirth are predictive of job separations as well. Data analysis confirms that marriage and childbirth remain main reasons behind job separation. In addition, it finds that highly educated female workers leave their jobs because of disagreeable working conditions.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 348 words || 
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5. Gilchrist, Eileen. and Query, Jim. "'I'm just not into this job:' The potential mediating role of social support in job burnout and job engagement among assisted living facility employees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p425336_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: With the “baby boomers” turning 65 in 2011, projections indicate that the elderly population will rapidly increase, and that by 2050 one in five Americans will reside in this group (CDC, 2003). Housing and care of elders is, and will continue to be, a daunting and perplexing issue; more so since increasing amounts of time and energy will be needed to organize and provide care for many of the elderly especially in assisted living facilities. Equally problematic is the demanding nature of employment in these facilities which reinforces the pivotal role of adequate social support. Given this spiraling population increase and key workplace challenges, research focusing on assisted living employees is imperative. Communication and aging scholars, as well as health communication scholars, can help lessen the intensity of this imminent crisis by conducting theory-based research with a key goal being to inform subsequent communication-based training interventions. Subsequently, this study examined job burnout, job engagement, and social support levels among 188 Assisted Living Facility employees employing the Relational Health Communication Competence Model (RHCCM; Kreps, 1988; Query & Kreps, 1996) and the narrative paradigm (Fisher, 1984, 1985, 1987) as theoretical foundations. The RHCCM’s major thrust is that individuals’ communication competence levels will rise as contextual complexity and equivocality increase, thereby shaping key health outcomes. The narrative paradigm posits that collected stories can be used to explain underlying interpretation schema. This investigation sought to expand the boundaries of the RHCCM by exploring the relationship of social support to job burnout and job engagement. Social support has been shown to reduce job burnout while job burnout has been linked to job engagement. Therefore, it seems reasonable then to infer that social support processes may be mediating adverse impacts of burnout and positively contributing to engagement. As Query, Kreps, Arneson, and Caso (2001) report, elicited narratives can illuminate social supportive acts. Two research qualitative-driven questions were thus advanced. The Critical Incident Technique (CIT; Flanagan, 1954) was then used to gather positive and negatives narratives. Salient limitations and directions for future research close the paper.

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