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2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8891 words || 
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1. Mellow, Nicole. and Tulis, Jeffrey. "Andrew Johnson and the Politics of Failure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59469_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Andrew Johnson is generally regarded as one of America's worst Presidents. His major legislative initiatives were defeated and his vetoes overridden. He was a pariah within his own party. Even his own cabinet opposed many of his most important policies. He was impeached and nearly convicted. Yet from his defeats came triumphs. Johnson’s vision of Reconstruction prevailed over that of the majority that opposed him. Southern politics and political culture were shaped for over a century by his "failed" vision. His rhetorical style, denounced at the time, became a template for 20th century presidents. And in escaping conviction on impeachment, Johnson re-founded the impeachment process itself –giving it a legalistic interpretation that governs contemporary practice. In short, Andrew Johnson's long term political influence and effect exceeded that of all but a few presidents, including many so-called successful presidents. In this paper, we begin to explore the paradox of immediate failure and yet long-term success by investigating Andrew Johnson’s role in shaping Reconstruction and its aftermath. This is the first step in a larger effort to articulate the conditions under which a political loss might be better than a win.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Marquez, Frances. "Latino/Latina Political Appointees and the Policymaking Process: An Examination of the Characteristics, Career Paths and Impact on Executive Decision-making of the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Presidential Appointees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p153104_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 387 words || 
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3. Piatote, Beth. "Difficult Subjects: Reimagining Domestic Relations in the Work of E. Pauline Johnson" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, Oct 12, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113811_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the early nineteenth century, as the United States and Canada gained ground as emerging nations, the concerns of native peoples shifted from the status of the “foreign” to the “domestic” realm. This movement is marked in a number of ways, including the effort to control both the material and metaphorical workings of the family in law. While early native-colonial relations were shaped around the paradigm of kinship as the language of political negotiation (e.g. treaties were conducted among “brothers” of equal status), this system gradually gave way to the asymmetrical structure of guardian-wardship, codified in the United States in the 1830s by the Marshall Trilogy and beginning 20 years later in Canada through a series of mid-century Indian Acts. In this paper, I explore how Canada’s Indian policies refigured gender relations through its legal codifications of Indian identity and how Canada used the language of “love” and “liberal benevolence” to carry out new kinds of violence against First Nations communities. I examine how the Canadian state attempted to define its policies in opposition to U.S. approaches, and how Native writers worked to disrupt the legal constructions of indigenous families through literary refiguring of native-colonial relations. In particular, I read the work of Mohawk writer Emily Pauline Johnson (1861-1913) within the context of Iroquois legal traditions, drawing specifically upon the political-metaphorical language of Six Nations diplomacy to reveal visions of political relations not fully explored by other critics, who have tended to view the political dimensions of her work within a pan-Indian paradigm. I analyze one of her earliest poems, “Brant: A Memorial Ode” (1886), as a re-imagining of political relations grounded in Six Nations treaty metaphor. Additionally, I analyze two short stories of interracial love, “A Red Girl’s Reasoning” and “Catharine of the ‘Crow’s Nest,’” to explore the ways in which Johnson refigures the national family, reclaims Indian identity, and contests the codified paternalism of the state. I place these stories specifically within the workings of the Indian Act and other policies designed to control the domestic world of native people, particularly women, and provide comparisons of Johnson’s depictions of Indian-white families with other contemporary works by non-native authors. I argue that it is through the multiple and unstable discourses of Canadian, U.S., and Mohawk nationalism that Johnson’s contributions can most fully be appreciated and understood.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 21 words || 
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4. Hora, Jennifer. "Beyond Swearing and Name-Calling: What Presidents Nixon and Johnson Really Talked About with Members of Congress." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85915_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I fully explore the nature of presidential contacts with members of Congress using conversations from both the Johnson and Nixon administrations.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 1 words || 
Info
5. Marquez, Frances. "Latino/Latina Political Appointees and the Policymaking Process: An Examination of their Impact on Executive Decision making in the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Administrations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85927_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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