Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 223 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 45 - Next  Jump:
2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 18 words || 
Info
1. Ghosn, Faten. and Bayer, Resat. "TO JOIN OR NOT TO JOIN? WHEN AND WHY COUNTRIES DECIDE TO JOIN AN ONGOING CONFLICT" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65680_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why do countries decide to join ongoing interstate conflicts? In this paper, we argue that the decision to join is influenced not only by the relationship between the original disputants and the potential joiner but also by the behavior of other potential joiners. Specifically, we test the role that alliances, contiguity, enduring rivalry, regime and civilization similarity, capabilities, and previous major power joining play in the decision to become militarily involved. We use a dataset that includes all potential joiners for the period between 1815 and 1992 for each MID where there was at least use of force. Our results from Cox and logistic regression indicate that potential joiners are influenced by both the behavior of the original disputants and other joiners. We see that a major power joining increases the risk of diffusion considerably. However, regime similarity does not play a major role.

2015 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 222 words || 
Info
2. Sundstrom, Malena. and Pho, Anna. "Party on, Europe? A meta-study of explanations about why young people join or do not join political parties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Omni San Diego Hotel, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1013893_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: Many European states have experienced a decline in political party membership. Political parties represent a crucial link between political representatives and citizens in representative democracy. The fact that fewer citizens choose to engage within the traditional parties in European democracies – with engagement in far right-wing parties increasing– can be seen as an important challenge, both to democracy within the member-states of the European Union, and to the European Union as such. The latter builds, to an extent, on a combination of direct representative democracy (the European Parliament) and indirect representative democracy (the Council).

The trend of lower engagement with political parties is most clear among young people, where the parties’ ‘regeneration’ has to be found. Young people move away from political parties to alternative forms of political participation and engagement. In this paper, we focus on why young people choose to join, as well as not to join, political parties: what explains their choices? Are the motivations different for young people with more extreme versus more moderate views, and for young people interested in one particular issue, versus politics in general? The paper draws on previous studies in political science and psychology, examining different explanations for young people´s party engagement. It develops a theoretical framework, and summarises and synthetises different existing explanations, and will report results from a pilot questionnaire study.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 8930 words || 
Info
3. Seo, Jungkun. "To Join or Not To Join? That Is The Question: The Senate New Democrat Coalition and Dual Representation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151775_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Why does a moderate coalition exist in the midst of polarized partisan conflicts? This paper investigates the motivations of Democratic senators who joined the Senate New Democrat Coalition (SNDC) during the 107th Congress (2001-2002). The members of SNDC tend to position themselves not as “liberal” Democrats, but as “centrists,” who generally support pro-business and strong defense policies. SNDC member became a natural target for the Bush administration seeking for “across-the-aisle” votes in the evenly-split 107th Senate. Using logistic regression analysis, I identify determinants of senators’ decisions to join the SNDC, controlling for constituency effects and senators’ ideology. My finding is that the nature of the SNDC membership is best explained by senator’s strategic choice to set up a distinct reputation among constituents. To differentiate their two-person delegation and representation in the Senate, senators from the same state associate themselves with or distance themselves from the SNDC. This study shows that electoral connection between senators and constituents still matters in the era of partisan polarization.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 202 words || 
Info
4. Rosén Sundström, Malena. "To join or not join? Factors influencing politically engaged young people to become party members" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252815_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the last decades, there has been a decline in political party memberships in many Western democracies. If this trend continues, it will challenge representative democracy, where the political parties constitute a crucial link between citizens and political representatives. The trend is also most pronounced among young people, where the ‘regeneration’ of political parties per definition has to be found. At the same time, many studies suggest that young people are not less interested or less engaged in politics, but chose other forms of political participation. This paper looks into what factors influence politically engaged young people to join, as well as not to join, a political party, analysing their motivations, attitudes and socialisation aspects. The study is based on 40 in-depth interviews in Sweden, both with young people who have chosen to become party members, as well as with politically engaged young people who are not party members. While both groups views representative democracy as a good thing, they demonstrate differences with regard to how efficient engagement in political parties are in order to influence politics. Concerning their motivations to become politically engaged, or the role of socialisation in their political engagement, the differences are less pronounced between the two groups.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 45 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy