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2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7193 words || 
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1. Bemiller, Michelle. and Schneider, Rachel. "It's Not Just a Joke: An Analysis of Sexist Humor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241479_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Sexist jokes as well as other forms of derogatory language are intimately connected to living in a patriarchal society. While discussed as harmless fun, sexist jokes are almost always riddled with powerful messages about how society sees women. These jokes focus on women’s personal attributes or lack thereof (e.g., jokes about breasts, weight, intelligence, personality characteristics), women’s place in the private sphere (e.g., jokes about cooking, cleaning and childcare), as well as jokes that are extremely violent towards women (e.g., suggestions of abusing women to put them in their place, killing women). By sexually objectifying women and demeaning their personal and professional abilities, jokes support a patriarchal culture that continues to oppress and subordinate women. Studies that have analyzed sexist humor, however, have failed to adequately look at this issue through a sociological, gender lens. This study attempts to fill this gap in the literature by focusing attention on the gendered nature of sexist humor. The current study is a content analysis of over 150 sexist jokes located through various internet joke sites. Dominant themes focus on the sexual objectification of women, women’s bodily imperfections, gender roles, and violence against women.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5570 words || 
Info
2. Smallpage, Steven. "To Explain a Joke: Leo Strauss & H. G. Gadamer, Esotericism & Hermeneutics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455628_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the hermeneutics of Leo Strauss in hopes of situating him in the larger context of the Continental hermeneutics tradition. Primarily, this re-contextualization takes place along the lines of Strauss’ (in)famous contribution to political theory/philosophy: the “rediscovery” of “esoteric/exoteric” writing. To say the least, this has been a very controversial “rediscovery.” What is seemingly less controversial, paradoxically, is that Strauss wrote esoterically himself. A brief outline of the literature surrounding Strauss illustrates this prejudice. What is not properly articulated or agreed upon, however, is the intention behind Strauss’ esotericism. In what follows, I outline some of the more prominent accounts of both Strauss’ conception of esotericism as well as the accounts of Strauss’ own use of esotericism. I begin with a long literature review that reorients the discussion of Strauss’ legacy through the lens of esotericism. Moving through the literature, I outline the refined but still reoccurring conceptions of both Strauss’ account of esotericism and Strauss’ use of esotericism in his writings. Ultimately, my paper concludes by illustrating and critically examining Strauss’ relationship to Gadamer. Specifically, I focus on each thinker’s conception of the Platonic dialogue and how this understanding of the Platnoic dialogue influences the assumptions underlying their hermeneutic method, or “experience.”

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 77 words || 
Info
3. Hamilton, Heidi. "The Framing of Sarah Palin: Outsider, Maverick, or National Joke" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p367360_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Upon becoming McCain’s running mate, Palin positioned herself within the frame of Washington outsider, matching McCain’s “maverick” rhetoric. As media and popular coverage of her took hold, Palin struggled, however, to control this frame. This paper argues that Palin’s framing was not just a question of representing herself as maverick or outsider, what K.V. Anderson has applied as the pioneer metaphor or frontier myth, but also defining what those terms mean for her public persona.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 100 words || 
Info
4. Scrivani, Emily. "It Was Just a Joke: Misogynistic Humor, Masculinity, and Rape Culture on College Campuses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, Nov 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p511667_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This poster focuses on ways students on college campuses reproduce and sustain rape culture through humor. Jokes about race, class, disability status and religion foster outrage in these communities, whereas sexist and homophobic jokes are generally accepted. This trend in college-educated individuals devaluing and debasing women and the LGBTQ community is a growing problem. Using the theoretical frameworks of Crenshaw, McRobbie, Collins, and Kimmel, this poster analyzes how we can use offensive behavior to deploy feminisms that correct this cultural phenomenon of humorous misogyny and patent acceptance of anti-feminist jokes to derail the prevalence of rape culture on college campuses.

2015 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 259 words || 
Info
5. Gurel, Perin. "Amerikan Jokes: The Folk Politics of Unlaughter in Turkey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Centre and Towers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1015612_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: This paper interrogates a local category of humor called “Amerikan esprileri,” or American jokes, in Turkey. Also known as “cold” or “stale” jokes, this folk category straddles multiple scholarly genres, including anti-jokes and puns, with no overarching structural qualities to unite the texts deemed “Amerikan.” Although some translated jokes, such as the infamous road-crossing chicken, also earn this label, most of these jokes would be unintelligible, even in translation, to non-native speakers of Turkish because of the specific cultural competencies they require. What makes a joke Amerikan in this context is the performer’s belief that it is un-funny and purposefully so. An Amerikan joke, in other words, seeks to evoke not laughter but a faux disgusted exclamation from the receiver: it is ridiculous to the point of oppressiveness. The label “Amerikan” suggests such jokes emanate from a degenerate civilization entirely out of touch with real-life worries and unwilling to communicate with others except through laughter gained at the expense of someone else's performative misery. It is significant that Amerikan jokes rose to prominence in the late 1980s and 1990s on the heels of the liberalization of the Turkish economy and the flooding of airways with American media exports. Based on ethnographic work in Turkey collecting Amerikan jokes and vernacular responses to them, this paper argues that the practice of telling Amerikan jokes and responding to them with a performance of misery allows both a tacit questioning of American cultural superiority and participation in postmodern “apolitical” resignation to the new world order on the part of middle class Turkish subjects.

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