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2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Aitamurto, Tanja. and Varma, Anita. "The Constructive Role of Journalism: Contentious Metadiscourse on Constructive Journalism and Solutions Journalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1366022_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyzes the normative roles of constructive journalism and solutions journalism by analyzing metajournalistic discourse about these two rising forms of alternative journalism. The findings show that constructive and solutions journalism are defined similarly: they are claimed to follow traditional journalistic norms and practices, even as they shift focus from problems to solutions. The metajournalistic discourse reveals a tension about the normative roles of journalism. Constructive journalism and solutions journalism justify their existence by the intensified need to solve vexing social issues. At the same time, they distance themselves from being advocates for social good, and instead insist that they are objectively covering solutions without endorsing them. This strategic rhetoric signals an attempt to draw a sharp line between constructive journalism and advocacy, and to situate constructive journalism within the boundaries of a traditional monitorial role of journalism. Metadiscourse about constructive journalism reveals reluctance to acknowledge and articulate its normative constructive role that seeks to help society.

2014 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 8494 words || 
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2. Coddington, Mark. "Clarifying Journalism’s Quantitative Turn: A Typology for Evaluating Data Journalism, Computational Journalism, and Computer-Assisted Reporting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada, Aug 06, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744485_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As quantitative forms have become more prevalent in professional journalism, it has become increasingly important to classify and distinguish between them. This paper defines and compares three quantitative forms of journalism — computer-assisted reporting, data journalism, and computational journalism — and introduces a four-part typology to evaluate their epistemological and professional dimensions. The three practices are characterized as related but distinct approaches to integrating the values of open-source culture and social science with those of professional journalism.

2012 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 144 words || 
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3. Anderson, Christopher. "From Public Journalism to the Public’s Journalism? Innovation and Tradition in the “Next Mayor” Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575414_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Abstract: In the early 1990s, a reform movement operating at the margins of the news industry launched a series of initiatives design to reform journalism from within. Calling itself the “public journalism movement,” advocates argued that professional journalism had become disconnected from the public it was supposed to serve and had reduced political coverage to a series of shallow reports primarily for political insiders. The paper examines the technological, organizational, and cultural connections between the public journalism and the digital journalism of the 21st century. The research draws upon ethnographic fieldwork and social network analysis, and is part of a larger project analyzing changes in news from 1997 until 2011. Specifically, the research looks at one Philadelphia project-- the “Next Mayor project”-- and analyzes how new technological affordances, personnel work histories, and culturally-grounded notions about what journalism “should be”-- guided the path of the project.

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