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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6763 words || 
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1. Parker, Curtis. and Owens, Timothy. "Gendered Justice: The Disposition of Justice in the Tippecanoe Counry Criminal Justice System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109922_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The researcher was interested in the impact of gender on the imposition of sanctions for misdemeanor offenses in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. After establishing specific criteria, he collected 95 cases from the public file court records. Several statistical analyses were performed with the data which yielded insight on the perceptions of gender in the criminal justice system of a conservative rural county in the US. The data provided interesting theoretical allusions as to the attitudes relevant actors in the criminal justice system have towards the genders. Findings and limitations are discussed at the end of the project.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 9390 words || 
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2. Starr, Amory. and Fernandez, Luis. "Political justice since seattle: The intersection of the U.S. criminal justice system and global justice activism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19723_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the shifting landscape of the intersection of global justice activism and the U.S. criminal justice system since the Seattle n30 WTO protests (30 November 1999). The National Lawyers Guild, drawing on 35 years of observation of First Amendment activity, concludes that post-Seattle protest policing manifests “a noticeable shift from reactive law enforcement to preemptive law enforcement.” Global justice activism is operationalized here to include: opposition to the international institutions such as the World Bank and WTO, anti-corporate campaigns associated with the anti-globalization movement, and movements which predate this movement but have become involved with it. The criminal justice system is operationalized here to include relevant laws, policing, investigation, prosecution, defense of activists, and lawsuits fighting back on all these aspects of the law (political litigation). Obviously this is a lot of territory to cover, and this article aims to simply describe the landscape, laying the groundwork for future analyses of each area in the above list.

2009 - ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING Pages: 24 pages || Words: 12781 words || 
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3. Carvalho, Gustavo. "The issue of justice at the International Financial System: a framework for the study of conceptions of justice and what justice requires at the International Capital Market" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING, Pontifical Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro Campus (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Jul 22, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p380994_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although the discipline of international relations has traditionally described international politics and economics as the outcome of the actions of self-interested, rational, actors, concerned with expediency and not with the imperatives of justice, in practice many times we see the opposite: the concerns of politicians, academics, and the general public with morality and justice. My claim is that this is so because justice, and debates about how to go about promoting it in our political communities and in the international system, are crucial to social life. Social institutions and norms have deep effects on the distribution of social goods, and the choices we make about their interpretations need to be morally justified. Assuming the existence of a plurality of lifestyles and of perspectives on what justice is, particularly outside of political communities, in this paper I claim that conceptions of justice are crucial to norm interpretation and justification. Using a norm-based constructivist perspective and insights from Michael Walzer’s communitarian approach to distributive justice, I also propose a framework for the study and comparison of those different conceptions of justice, and as a preliminary study of its possibilities, I apply it to the international capital market (ICM) and the analysis of a what a liberal, market-oriented, conception of justice would define as a just distribution of capital through the ICM.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 198 words || 
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4. Akhter, Rifat. and Wilson, Janet. "Where do Physically Abused Bangladeshi Wives Turn? Retributive Justice, Restorative Justice, or No Justice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1027493_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The World Health Organization in 2005 revealed that between 53% and 62% of ever-married Bangladeshi women experience physical or sexual abuse by their male partner. Within Bangladesh, cultural norms and financial reliance on husbands dictate that these women remain married to their abuser. Using data from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2007, this article differentiates between physically abused wives who turn to the more formal retributive justice system (for example, police and lawyers) and those who turn to the more informal restorative justice system (for example, family, friends, and village councils). While wives who seek any assistance are currently working, make financial decisions, have few children, read newspapers, and rarely saw their father beat their mother, wives who turn to retributive justice options are less educated, older, and do not watch television. Wives who sought restorative justice options are more educated, poorer, and watch television. Policy implications indicate that anti-abuse campaigns utilizing newspapers may reach the largest group of abused women. Additionally, an expansion of the restorative justice options to address the abuser, yet retain the marriage, may be useful in decreasing future abuse and continuing the support of Bangladeshi women.

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