Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 18 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4  - Next
2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 20 pages || Words: 4738 words || 
Info
1. Dunlap, Carissa. "Haunani-Kay Trask: Native Hawaiian Sovereignty Rhetoric" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p189671_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This essay examines the Native Hawaiian Sovereignty rhetoric of Haunani-Kay Trask. It employs feminist standpoint theory as well as a feminist nationalism perspective. These two theories are applied looking at the history, environment and culture, and the discrimination of Native Hawaiians. The author argues that her writings and poetry are effective rhetorical devices in the Native Hawaiian sovereignty movement.

2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 144 words || 
Info
2. Chai, Kay Yu Yuan. "Save the Humans: Rehabilitating Reductionist, Anthropocentric Views of Petkeeping With Ecopsychology. Kay Chai, Duquesne University" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1112450_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on petkeeping has focused on its health benefits, such as better heart health and recovery from myocardial infarction, and increased sense of wellbeing among individuals who are sick or dying. Evolutionary theorists have viewed petkeeping as mutualism or as social parasitism in which humans are “manipulated” into taking care of animals at the cost of sacrificing resources otherwise available for their human offsprings, hence reducing reproductive fitness. Psychologists have viewed petkeepers as “projecting” human attributes onto animals. I will argue the aforementioned research perspectives reflect a larger eco-psychological crisis in which humans are viewed as fundamentally different from the rest of nature, and relationships between humans and their nonhuman counterparts can only be observed through a costs-benefits analytic lens. I will also use two clinical case studies of petkeepers to explore how nurturing an animal companion restores our capacity for love and reparation.

2016 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 444 words || 
Info
3. Saranillio, Dean. "“Fuck Ben”: Haunani-Kay Trask and Alternative Genealogies of Settler Colonial Studies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Denver, Colorado, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1136542_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: The particular genealogy of settler colonialism in Hawai’i, that is critiques of Hawai‘i as a settler society, begins with Haunani-Kay Trask. Trask’s essay, “Settlers of Color and ‘Immigrant’ Hegemony,” was written in a particular moment when a seemingly multicultural “Aloha for All” historical bloc seeks to eliminate the few Native “entitlements” remaining in Hawai‘i since the 1893 overthrow. These legal assaults were a backlash to the gains made by the sovereignty movement throughout the 1990s. Criticisms of settler colonialism that claim a genealogy devoid of Native scholars thus functions to erase the generative contributions of scholars such as Trask. Trask’s article, as in much of her scholarship, frames Hawai‘i movements for self-determination within the longue duree of global Indigenous movements against settler societies and empire. One take away from Trask’s “Settlers of Color” article is to tie anti-imperialist politics to critiques of settler colonialism. This paper utilizes this framing by moving historically to examine settler colonial, Native and Asian American studies through the Columbian Exposition of 1893. By examining imperial theft and genocide inscribed within the exhibits at the Columbian Exposition, within the then present realities of the economic depression of the 1890s, this paper examines the affective work in settler state theatricality that allows for a global celebration of white supremacy even in a moment where the mode of production underpinning its existence—capitalism—was most under threat. Instead of arguing that the economic depression and celebration of white supremacy was contradictory, I aim to show that they are concomitant strategies that must represent white settler society—the White City—as a “more deserved power” than Native nations and economies for a capitalist system to even survive. The paper ends with what settler colonialism does to open one’s visual world to the implications of identifying with a genocidal US settler state. Through Trask’s “Fuck Ben” sign, held by her in front of Washington Place, in response to then Governor Cayetano’s removal of OHA trustees due to the Rice v. Cayetano ruling I end by arguing that what is at stake in discussions of settler colonialism is not gaining a foothold in academic institutions but rather to transform the power relations of “lands heavily settler colonized.” I wish to end by focusing on anti-imperialist and settler colonial critique by sharing what I learned from Haunani-Kay Trask, particularly the instances of Black soldiers defecting from the US military to fight alongside Filipinos during the Philippine American war. Besides the activism and scholarship of Haunani-Kay Trask, it is these kinds of insurgencies, not to mention the political and intellectual foresight to defect from a genocidal state, that might add to an alternative genealogy for “settlers of color” to reorient ourselves.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6772 words || 
Info
4. Amundson, Najla. "The Pink Bubble of Feminism: Did Habermas Find his Ideal Mary Kay?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p258907_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Mary Kay consultants enjoy unlimited earning potential in a supportive, communal, matriarchal organizational structure featuring mentoring, support, and sisterhood. Often referred to by its consultants as the Pink Bubble, the cultural environment encourages positive thinking and positive discourse. This communication philosophy seems to parallel the theory of communicative action where women are empowered to become an idealized manifestation of beauty, poise, status and wealth. I argue that Mary Kay’s Pink Bubble suppresses discourse that allows for authenticity -- ultimately reproducing woman as object.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy