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2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 16 pages || Words: 5926 words || 
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1. Ventresca, Marc. and Rosenberg, Steven. "'Keywords in culture&economy: 'Postindustrial,' 'information,' and 'knowledge' as modifiers, 1950-2005'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243080_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The presumed features of the ‘knowledge economy’ regularly drive critical policy decisions around economy and industrial policy and often spill over into action and rhetoric in education both higher education and primary secondary, labor markets, social security and aging policy, and broadly into social policy considerations. But the ‘knowledge economy’ is one of several terms that have come to be used to summarize developments and trends in broad features of economic activity: Knowledge economy, information economy, ‘new’ economy, innovation economy, and like terms all assert basic changes in the structure and drivers of economic productivity. And add to these companion terms like postindustrial society, information society, the digital divide, etc. that blur the specificity of ‘economy’ and ‘society’ and also carry models of technology and institutional and societal change. What is to be learned by investigating these keywords and their evolution? In this paper we investigate the post-war development of keywords operating as nouns in apposition to 'economy'. Our project builds upon the work of Timothy Mitchell, tracking further the historical development of the concept of the economy by tracing keywords such as 'knowledge', 'post-industrial', and 'information', used to suggest a particular quality to this concept.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 9148 words || 
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2. Dechief, Diane. "Names as Keywords: Theorizing Immigration-Influenced Name Changes in Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300256_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Canadian immigration and settlement practices have been altering individuals’ names since the mid-1800s. From the common explanations of immigration officials engaging in novel orthography as they completed forms, to families altering their names to make them easier for their neighbours to pronounce, a range of dominant cultural influences were at work. Today, these forces continue; they are evident in such techno-bureaucratic minutiae as maximum character lengths for permanent residents’ names, and in the decade-long policy encouraging people with the religiously-significant Sikh names ‘Kaur’ and ‘Singh’ to remove these names before applying to immigrate (CBC, July 2007). They are also heard in day-to-day introductions as some newcomers choose to use common English or French names to present themselves, and to potentially make themselves more employable (Ng et al., 2007).

With these and other scenarios in mind I ask, in what ways and through what means do minority culture members and migrants to Canada change their names? What roles do legislation, policy and state regulated data collection procedures have in these shifts? How are names altered through less official interactions? What implications do these name changes have for Canada as a nation-state? What are the outcomes in terms of nationalism or cultural pluralism?

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 50 words || 
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3. Montero Perez, Maribel. "Incidental and Intentional Vocabulary Learning through Video with Full or (Glossed) Keyword Captions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p699799_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We present an experimental study investigating the effect of three techniques to increase the incidence and quality of L2 word learning through video with L2 subtitles (i.e. captioning): visual salience of novel words (full vs. keyword captioning), test announcement (forewarning students of vocabulary tests), and access to meaning (glossed captions).

2009 - International Communication Association Words: 317 words || 
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4. Stanton, Richard. "Keywords in the Demonization of Soft Power" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299536_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Towards the end of the twentieth century American sociologist Leon Mayhew impugned public relations as applying persuasion and influence, inexorably altering the shape of public opinion and thus the public sphere. The influence of public relations created a “New Public,” which, unlike Habermas’ mythical public of the Enlightenment, was incapable of differentiating real and fabricated information. Consequently, this New Public was unable to form genuine opinions or interpret public policy. Two of Mayhew’s theories have the capacity to influence post-structural public relations; the rhetoric of presentation and the redemption of tokens of influence. This panel proposal explains Mayhew’s argument and provides an introduction to the relevance of his work as the field of public relations struggles with the keywords of globalization, regionalization and localization along with its own social relationships to communities, ‘tribes’ and the news media in the early twenty first century.
In the late twentieth century Leon Mayhew, a U.S. sociologist, set out to prove that public relations1 exerts enormous persuasion and influence upon the mass public of western culture, and that the consequent rationalization “erodes the social organization of public opinion” (Mayhew, 1997, p. ix). Mayhew’s New Public is caught up in a modernity surrounded by sociopolitical and economic products and services which it is unable to differentiate, thus placing it in harm’s way; a position that is manipulated by public relations’ intent on delivering maximized profits to sociopolitical and economic clients. The communicators most reviled by Mayhew are public relations counsellors, advertisers, and marketers, all representing client-based communication as consumable product, and seeking immunity from any ‘redemption of tokens’ most often associated with ‘solidarity’ between client and consumer. By imagining historical mass publics in a particular way, Mayhew at once is able to imagine his own New Public in which mass opinion is cogniscent of the aims and goals of public relations working on behalf of clients, refusing thus to be persuaded and influenced.

2009 - International Communication Association Words: 103 words || 
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5. McLuskie, Ed. "“Subject” as “actor” in Dervin’s Sense-Making Methodology: Keyword reflections from critical theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298730_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Dervin’s Sense-Making Methodology (SMM) shares with Critical Theory a democratic conception of “communication” which puts the “subject” back into methodology’s conventional term, “research subject.” In efforts to return actors to communicating, SMM researchers aim for windows of participation where subjects-as-actors can (re)interpret, (re)experience and (re)express socio-cultural webs that join, constrain, and define the possibilities of the social act. When research describes strategic-instrumental (inter)actions, SMM provides aspirational narratives of communicating subjects hoping to live together, discuss matters with each other, and realize autonomy – all critical-theoretical requirements for identity, consent, and authentic interpretation. SMM then contributes knowledge of systematic suppressions of communicative action.

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