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2013 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 96 words || 
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1. Bruyneel, Kevin. "The King’s Body: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and the Politics of Collective Memory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p653065_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper analyzes the MLK National Memorial, focusing on the consensual, liberal, and post-racial views implicated in production of Dr. King’s figure in statue form. In American collective memory, a mythical image of King is deployed to dispossess the nation of its racial past and ennoble a post-Civil Rights America. Due to King’s importance for how Americans tell the story of the nation’s racial history, a study of the MLK Memorial is about more than his legacy; it is an insight on the constraints of contemporary political discourse, and also reveals efforts to resist such constraints.

2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 142 words || 
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2. Arnold, Oliver. "Poor Naked Kings: Tragic Subjects and Compassionable Objects in King Lear" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p928675_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Early modern dramatic theory privileges the suffering of the great; the early modern theology of compassion privileges the suffering of the humble. King Lear’s realm is full of good students of tragic decorum: the “side-piercing sight” of Lear’s misery, they argue, compels a more powerful and meaningful kind of pity than the misery of less exalted persons. Lear himself attempts to retune the play, to shift its governing register from pitying the great to compassionating “poor naked wretches,” but he (mostly) fails because the other characters bend the ethical logic of compassion to the rules of art: they make Lear the privileged object not only of pity but also of compassion. The apocalyptic bleakness of the play’s final moments is complicated by the radical tension between the affective power of Lear grieving for Cordelia and Lear’s famous revelation about “poor naked wretches.”

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 171 words || 
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3. Lee, Young Suk. "Weltanshauung and Leadership of King Sejong in the Creation of Hangul:_x000d_For a New Readership on the Leadership of King Sejong the Great" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362860_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study aims at revisiting the leadership of King Sejong the Great, the fourth King of the Chosun Dynasty from 1418 to 1450, focusing on his bold and balanced sense of international cultural relations. King Sejong was regarded by his contemporary scholars from all over the Northeast countries as 'the Saint-Ruler of the East' and still respected by the most Koreans as 'Sejong the Great Monarch'. King Sejong's sense of balance and humane initiative in the making of Hangul, Korean letter, the nuclei of King Sejong's politico-cultural leadership, originated from the international cultural relations of the fifteenth century's Northeast Asian region. Through creating Hangul, King Sejong intended not only to build a political system for his people, but also to establish a regional and international peace system for the region. Drawing the image, with the real evidence from the Chosun Wangjo Shillok, the True Record Chosun Dynasty, of international cultural capacity and international political character of King Sejong, this thesis aims at theorizing the cultural leadership of King Sejong the Great.

2013 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 151 words || 
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4. Chen-Morris, Raz. "The King's Two Minds: The Fragmented Image of the Melancholic King and Seventeenth-Century New Science" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Sheraton Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p603236_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In his magisterial analysis of the king’s two bodies, Ernst Kantorowicz shows how theological precepts have been transported into the political realm, forming a political theology of sovereignty. Kantorowicz introduces his argument through a brilliant analysis of Shakespeare's Richard II. Rereading the shattered mirror scene from Richard II, this paper suggests that a crucial transformation has taken place in modes of knowing associated with the image of royalty at the turn of the seventeenth century. Moving from Arcimboldo's image of Rudolph II as Vertumnus, through Shakespeare's Tempest and the frontispiece of Kepler's Tabulae Rudolphinae, to Descartes' analysis of the rainbow, this paper outlines the emergence of the royal persona as an embodiment not of melancholy, but as the upholder of the radical ideals of the New Science. A new image of royal power finds its legitimacy in the ability of natural philosophers to explain and operate new modes of knowledge.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 13 pages || Words: 4340 words || 
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5. Carey, Allan. "The Speech of the King: An Examination of Speech and Deed in Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War as Understood Through the First Speech of King Archidamus" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p267130_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: To understand Thucydides one needs to consider the profound relationship between the author's narration and the speeches of characters. This paper examines that relationship in the first speech of King Archidamus and its subsequent implications.

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