Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,459 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 292 - Next  Jump:
2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 218 words || 
Info
1. Knopes, Julia. "Knowing, Not Knowing, and Knowing In-Between: Responding to Epistemological Rifts at an American Medical School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1259576_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As landmark research in the social sciences has revealed, medical students must frequently contend with uncertainty as they develop new skills and knowledge as future physicians. Drawing on 12 months of ethnographic research in a Midwestern US allopathic medical school, this paper aims to nuance the concept of “uncertainty.” It demonstrates that the boundary between ‘knowing’ and ‘not knowing’ is fluid when medical students learn to integrate multiple forms of knowledge to understand complex biomedical concepts. Throughout the study reported on here, when medical students lacked one type of information about a topic, they frequently drew upon other forms of knowledge to “fill in the gap,” thereby reconciling what they felt certain of with their initial uncertainty. This paper will present key examples from anthropological observations and interviews to illustrate the impact of students’ micro-level encounters with uncertainty on the broader epistemology of clinical learning and practice. It will suggest that physicians-in-training do not simply acclimate to ‘not knowing,’ but that early encounters with uncertainty may prompt medical students to creatively synthesize information and develop active responses to uncertain situations. The paper will engage with science and technology studies, and the theme of Sensibilities, by highlighting how biomedical practitioners learn to effectively “grasp” new scientific knowledge and to “respond” when they seem to lack key skills or information.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 8680 words || 
Info
2. Beierle, Thomas. "The Benefits and Costs of Disclosing Information About Risks: What Do We Know About Right-to-Know?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p62538_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Following the attacks of September 11, 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency and other government agencies removed information from their websites that they feared could invite attacks on critical public and private infrastructure. Accordingly, the benefits and costs of environmental information disclosure programs have come under increasing scrutiny. This article describes a framework for examining these benefits and costs, and illustrates the framework through brief case studies of two information disclosure programs: risk management planning and materials accounting. The article outlines what we know and still need to find out about information disclosure programs in order to appropriately balance benefits and costs.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6637 words || 
Info
3. Stiff, Catherine. "Knowledge of Child Illnesses in Southern Ghana: What Do People Know and How Do They Know It?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108705_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is concerned with the determinants of child health in Ghana. Specifically, what do people know about the causes of three serious child illnesses – malaria, diarrheal disease, and respiratory infection – and what determines biomedical knowledge? Answers to these questions have important implications for understanding the transmission of knowledge in developing country settings as well as for constructing health policy. I argue that knowledge of etiology is a fairly understudied area of demographic research in developing countries; standard research has tended to focus on the role of education in child survival, without much exploration of the mechanisms through which education affects child health. I attempt to apply a more sociological approach by exploring the “health knowledge” mechanism.

I rely primarily on survey data (N=2500) collected in Ghana's coastal Central Region in 2002, as well as qualitative interviews conducted in 2003. In descriptive and bivariate analysis I find that knowledge of etiology of these three illnesses is quite low. For example, only half of respondents can identify the cause of malaria. Moreover and as expected, level of education is strongly associated with health knowledge. In multivariate analysis I find that, in addition to the strong effects of education and literacy, other individual, household, and community characteristics are influential, including media exposure, household SES, and urban residence. This suggests alternative pathways (beyond formal schooling) to improving child survival in Ghana.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 292 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy