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2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 218 words || 
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1. Knopes, Julia. "Knowing, Not Knowing, and Knowing In-Between: Responding to Epistemological Rifts at an American Medical School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1259576_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As landmark research in the social sciences has revealed, medical students must frequently contend with uncertainty as they develop new skills and knowledge as future physicians. Drawing on 12 months of ethnographic research in a Midwestern US allopathic medical school, this paper aims to nuance the concept of “uncertainty.” It demonstrates that the boundary between ‘knowing’ and ‘not knowing’ is fluid when medical students learn to integrate multiple forms of knowledge to understand complex biomedical concepts. Throughout the study reported on here, when medical students lacked one type of information about a topic, they frequently drew upon other forms of knowledge to “fill in the gap,” thereby reconciling what they felt certain of with their initial uncertainty. This paper will present key examples from anthropological observations and interviews to illustrate the impact of students’ micro-level encounters with uncertainty on the broader epistemology of clinical learning and practice. It will suggest that physicians-in-training do not simply acclimate to ‘not knowing,’ but that early encounters with uncertainty may prompt medical students to creatively synthesize information and develop active responses to uncertain situations. The paper will engage with science and technology studies, and the theme of Sensibilities, by highlighting how biomedical practitioners learn to effectively “grasp” new scientific knowledge and to “respond” when they seem to lack key skills or information.

2010 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 1 pages || Words: 199 words || 
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2. Chingos, Matthew., Henderson, Michael. and West, Martin. "We Know What We Know: School Performance and Attitudes about Quality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Crowne Plaza Hotel Ravinia, Atlanta, Georgia, Jan 06, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396308_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most analyses of citizens’ knowledge about policy demonstrate that all but the most politically sophisticated Americans are poorly informed about public affairs. Indeed, this has frequently fueled skepticism about citizens’ ability to hold elected officials accountable in American democracy. However, this work has mostly relied on quizzes of encyclopedic knowledge of civics. Even if citizens remain poorly informed about the most arcane tidbits of policy knowledge, their perceptions about government performance in particular service areas may reflect actual performance when information is more readily available. We use unique survey data to test this relationship in the case of school quality. Using geo-coding techniques we matched each respondent to specific schools in their locality which they were asked to evaluate. Comparing these evaluations to public reports of school quality as well as to our own measures of performance, we find that citizens’ perceptions of school quality tend to reflect available information. This relationship is especially strong for those who have a vested interest in this sort of information, i.e. parents of school age children and property owners.

2011 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 159 words || 
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3. Antler, Caroline., Mcauliff, Kathleen. and Ferrari, Joseph. "Knowing all and the All Knowing: Does higher education alter our approach to religion?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, Jun 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497161_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The shortened Post-Critical Belief Scale of Duriez, Soenens, and Hutsebaut (2004) was developed to assess individual attitudes toward religion. The scale groups individuals into four different quadrants representing their religiosity: Literal Disaffirmation, Reductive Interpretation, Restorative Interpretation, and Literal Affirmation (Duriez et al., 2004). According to the findings of Fontaine, Duriez, Luyten, and Hustebaut (2003) individuals falling within the Literal Affirmation group can be categorized as more prejudice and less developed cognitively and members of the Literal Disaffirmation group can be categorized as more intellectual and less dogmatic. Such interpretations of each group leads to the assumption that the religious perspective of an individual entering an institution of higher education might change as the individual becomes more educated. This study aimed to assess the affect of higher education at a Catholic university on the Post-Critical beliefs of its student body. The post-critical beliefs of students at DePaul University were examined in relationship to year in school.

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