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2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 218 words || 
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1. Knopes, Julia. "Knowing, Not Knowing, and Knowing In-Between: Responding to Epistemological Rifts at an American Medical School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1259576_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As landmark research in the social sciences has revealed, medical students must frequently contend with uncertainty as they develop new skills and knowledge as future physicians. Drawing on 12 months of ethnographic research in a Midwestern US allopathic medical school, this paper aims to nuance the concept of “uncertainty.” It demonstrates that the boundary between ‘knowing’ and ‘not knowing’ is fluid when medical students learn to integrate multiple forms of knowledge to understand complex biomedical concepts. Throughout the study reported on here, when medical students lacked one type of information about a topic, they frequently drew upon other forms of knowledge to “fill in the gap,” thereby reconciling what they felt certain of with their initial uncertainty. This paper will present key examples from anthropological observations and interviews to illustrate the impact of students’ micro-level encounters with uncertainty on the broader epistemology of clinical learning and practice. It will suggest that physicians-in-training do not simply acclimate to ‘not knowing,’ but that early encounters with uncertainty may prompt medical students to creatively synthesize information and develop active responses to uncertain situations. The paper will engage with science and technology studies, and the theme of Sensibilities, by highlighting how biomedical practitioners learn to effectively “grasp” new scientific knowledge and to “respond” when they seem to lack key skills or information.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 156 words || 
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2. Wollinger, Gina., Dreißigacker, Arne. and Baier, Dirk. "Burglary Prevention – What We know and What We don’t Know (Yet)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1147032_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Regarding the period from 2006 to 2015, in Germany the number of residential burglaries is on the rise. Hereby, burglary offenses are characterized by a low likelihood of catching the offender on the one hand and victims who are suffering financial and psychological consequences on the other hand. For this reason, a comprehensive research by the Criminological Research Institute of Lower Saxony surveyed 1,329 victims in five big cities of Germany.
After a short outline of this research project, the emphasis of the presentation is on burglary prevention. Hereby, households with attempted and those with completed offenses will be compared. The results indicate that additional locks, hiding a longer absence, and a sensitized neighborhood are predictors for failed burglary attempts. Hereof, implications can be made with regard to how residents can protect themselves against burglary offenses and what city planner and producer can do. The presentation will end with a short outlook of further need for research.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Rotem, Nir. "Know the Reports, Know the Organization: UNHCR and the Syrian Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1247786_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Humanity, impartiality, confidentiality, and neutrality are universal principles of humanitarianism, guiding its activity while defining its very essence. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) recognizes these principles, and attempts to follow them by way of implementation in its different programmes, the Syrian one included. Nonetheless, principles represent values and thus are different from actual knowledge and practice. This space of possibilities for a conversion of knowledge between values and practice stands at the center of this paper. Applying a Sociology of Knowledge perspective, UNHCR activity around the Syrian crisis is explored based on mission statements and annual reports. Broader context is provided by examining the Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan (3RP), a “broad regional partnership strategy,” which brings together more than 200 organizations responding to the Syria Crisis under the leadership of UNHCR and The United Nations Development Programme. Put together, such documents provide an insight into the institutional logic(s) that were engraved in them, associated with distinct habitus. Thus, it is a case where two patterns of knowledge meet. Their possible inosculation can teach about the changing nature of development and humanitarian aid in the face of crisis and beyond.

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