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2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Words: 298 words || 
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1. Carnes, Matthew. "Vertical Integration between Organized Labor and Labor-based Parties: The Politics of Labor Relations in Argentina, 1940-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p197381_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper is part of a larger project on the political determinants of labor market policy and outcomes in Latin America. In this paper, I focus on the case of Argentina. I argue that long-term patterns of economic policy, coupled with shorter-term concerns about political competition, have produced a non-monotonic relationship between the fate of organized labor and the Peronist Partido Justicialista. Drawing on the economic literature regarding the organization of the firm and incentives for vertical integration, I develop a theory that models when we should expect closest collaboration between labor-based parties and labor unions. Greatest gains for labor have come during Peronist resurgences and, counter-intuitively, during periods of internal division within the PJ while it was in power. Retrenchment on labor policy, on the other hand, has come during periods of Radical or military rule, when the Peronists were weakest, and in the presidency of Carlos Menem, when the Peronist hold on power was strong enough that the demands of organized labor could be marginalized in favor of export-oriented reforms.
This paper finds that the most recent period of Argentine history, the post-Menem and post-crisis years of 2003 to the present, has been marked by a significant reactivation of organized labor union activity and important modifications in labor union bargaining and pension policy. This is puzzling, because the 1990s reforms were expected to leave unions so weakened that their incidence in the economic and political life of the nation would only further diminish. I argue that the recent resurgence in organized labor’s institutional standing and economic gains is attributable to the internal competition within the PJ after the 2001-2002 crisis, which has created incentives for President Nestor Kirchner to cultivate ties to this traditional base of his party.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 15 pages || Words: 3757 words || 
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2. Blaeuer, Daniel. "Bodies at Work: Returning Sweat Labor to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT)." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p195313_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores questions of identity as they emerge within the contested terrain of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The authors follow the emergence the “worker” within the new economy and workforce. In the end, the authors look at labor practice and participatory management for suggestions on how we can reinterpret the field and practice of human resources and labor organizing.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 10414 words || 
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3. Cook, Maria. "International Labor Standards and Domestic Labor Advocates: The Politics of Labor Rights in Latin America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40592_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As consensus on the importance of labor rights and standards begins to emerge in the international arena, the situation for workers in many developing countries continues to deteriorate. This raises a question that has often been overlooked in current debates on international labor standards in the global economy: How can international labor rights and standards be effectively promoted in countries that lack strong domestic labor rights advocates? Most discussion of international labor rights focuses on the construction of legal norms and instruments to promote labor rights but ignores the importance of domestic agents for implementing and defending these rights on the ground. It is often assumed that the existence of a core set of international labor rights can be leveraged by domestic agents to improve or protect national standards, without considering whether domestic advocates, principally trade unions, possess the capacity or will to do so.

This paper looks at the role of international pressure and union strength in assessing the extent to which labor movements have promoted or effectively defended labor rights during periods of widespread labor law reform in Latin America in the 1990s. The paper concludes with the implications of these Latin American developments for the contemporary debate on effective promotion of international labor standards.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 10502 words || 
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4. Cook, Maria. "International Labor Standards and Domestic Labor Advocates: Unions, Labor Reform, and Workers' Rights in Latin America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100172_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As consensus on the importance of labor rights and standards begins to emerge in the international arena, the situation for workers in many developing countries continues to deteriorate. This raises a question that has often been overlooked in current debates on international labor standards in the global economy: How can international labor rights and standards be effectively promoted in countries that lack strong domestic labor rights advocates? Most discussion of international labor rights focuses on the construction of legal norms and instruments to promote labor rights but ignores the importance of domestic agents for implementing and defending these rights on the ground. It is often assumed that the existence of a core set of international labor rights can be leveraged by domestic agents to improve or protect national standards, without considering whether domestic advocates, principally trade unions, possess the capacity or will to do so.

This paper looks at the role of international pressure and union strength in assessing the extent to which labor movements have promoted or effectively defended labor rights during periods of widespread labor law reform in Latin America in the 1990s. The paper concludes with the implications of these Latin American developments for the contemporary debate on effective promotion of international labor standards.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 217 words || 
Info
5. Reese, Ellen. and Chase-Dunn, Christopher. "Labor Activists and the World Social Forum: Challenging Neoliberalism, Building International Labor Solidarity, and Strengthening Labor-Community Alliances" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251059_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since it was first established in 2001, the World Social Forum has quickly become the largest international gathering of social activists who are opposed to neoliberalism and a key site for labor organizing. Using survey data from the 2005 and 2007 World Social Forum meetings, we examine the social characteristics and political views of labor activists attending these meetings, and how labor activists compare to other kinds of participants at the WSF. We also compare the characteristics of labor activists from the global north with those of their counterparts from the global south as well as explore the characteristics of labor activists that are more and less involved in other kinds of social movements. We discuss the implications that these survey findings have for understanding the challenges and prospects for building community-labor alliances and international labor solidarity. Using field notes from the 2007 WSF meeting in Nairobi, we then explore the various ways that labor activists are using this “open space” to challenge neoliberalism, coordinate transnational labor campaigns, strengthen international labor solidarity, and forge and solidify their ties to activists involved in other kinds of social movements. We also discuss the content of internal debates and discussions taking place at this historic meeting regarding how the labor movement can best challenge neoliberalism within the current global economy

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