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2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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1. Hays, Jude. "Modeling Diffusion Processes with Spatial Lags: Some Problems and Solutions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p150983_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2004 - International Studies Association Words: 97 words || 
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2. Friedman, Elisabeth. "Gender Rights in Latin America: Following, Transforming, Leading and Lagging the Transnational" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p74343_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper asks to what extent transnational norms and institutions are influencing rights claims and rights legislation at the national level in Latin America. One particularly dynamic – and fraught -- arena of rights at the transnational level is that of gender rights, including women's rights and sexual and reproductive rights. Thus, this paper examines four types of gender rights in the region: political quotas for women; ending domestic violence; reproductive rights, particularly abortion; and LGBT or queer rights. It concludes by speculating on why the effects of the transnational have differed across the rights types.

2010 - 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 188 words || 
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3. Sattarzadeh, Sahar. "California’s Fault Line: How Immigrant and Migrant Students Still Lag Behind" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397722_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The state of California has the largest immigrant population in the U.S., accounting for approximately 27 percent of the nation’s immigrant community. Most of California’s immigrants are from Latin America or Asia. California is still coming to grips with how best to deal with the education of its immigrant and migrant populations. There are substantial differences between particular populations, especially between immigrants from East Asia and Latin America, who tend to have the highest and lowest levels of education, respectively. However, studies show that children of immigrants in the state are receiving a better quality of education (i.e., access to greater resources and support) than their parents had. California has specialized resources to address the needs of its immigrant and migrant populations, but there are still many questions left unanswered. In reviewing policy reports, academic articles, state-level data, and case studies, this paper focuses on how policies and practices of K-12 schooling in California impact issues of exclusion/marginalization, ethnicity/identity, class divisions, educational quality, language, and the transition to higher education. Many immigrant and migrant students are still marginalized in California schools.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 228 words || 
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4. Lopez, Oresta., Fajardo, Horacia. and Barcena, Laura. "Gender empowerment in socially disadvantaged adult-women overcoming educational lag" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p636196_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This presentation is the analysis of the results obtained in a pilot project called EDHUCA to overcome educational lag in extremely poor families enrolled in the Program Oportunidades. The project was conducted in three states: Zacatecas, San Luis Potosí and Jalisco, benefiting more than 60 thousand adults (80% women) who, through conditional cash transfer were able to return to school to continue their studies in basic education and obtained the corresponding certification. For this study we conducted focal groups, interviews and live histories in a small sample of beneficiary women in the three states. The focus of this presentation will be the stories of the women on the transformational power of education. Applying the theoretical frameworks of social interactionism and grounded theory to women’s discourses we have been able to identify gender empowering metaphors of adult women who completed their studies. The results show that the education received, particularly literacy, and the provision of economic resources had a great impact in their personal history, their self-esteem, their ability to socialize and their role in their family and their community. This experience, not only transformed women’s self-concept but made new agents of change in their family and community. This project, pioneer in Latin America, shows that social policies with gender perspective and a focus in education have great potential to eradicate poverty and gender marginalization.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Uka, Fitim., von Suchodoletz, Antje. and Larsen, Ross. "A cross-lagged analysis of longitudinal associations between executive functions and intelligence among preschoolers from Kosovo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959717_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite initial findings from neuropsychological studies for no relation between executive functions (EFs) and intelligence (IQ), evidence for such an association accumulated over the past decade (Ardila, Pineda, & Rosselli, 2000; Colom et al., 2008; Friedman et al., 2006). Particularly studies with adults suggest that different components of EFs (inhibitory control, attention shifting, working memory) are differentially related to measures of IQ “suggesting that current intelligence measures do not equally assess a wide range of executive control abilities likely required for many ‘intelligent’ behaviors” (Friedman et al., 2006, p. 172). However, findings that the structure of EFs might be different in early childhood raise the question of how EFs and IQ are related in this age period. An early study among preschoolers, for example, suggests that there is no such relation (Welsh, Pennington, & Groisser, 1991). Extending previous research the present study aims to examine the bidirectional relations between different EFs and IQ over the preschool period. Based on previous results (Friedman et al., 2006), we expected to find that components of EFs are differentially related to the IQ measure over time.

A sample of 150 preschool children from Kosovo, a lower-middle income region in southeastern Europe (t1: 50.7% girls, Mage = 4.58 years, SD = .08) participated in three waves of data collection every six months. At each time point, EFs were assessed with the Pencil Tap (inhibitory control; Smith-Donald et al., 2007), KAB-C Number Recall (working memory; Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004), and the Dimensional Card Change Sort (attention shifting; Hongwanishkul et al., 2005). Raven’s Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) were used to measure fluid intelligence (Raven, Raven, & Court, 1986). Three separate autoregressive cross-lag models (ACL) were fit to the longitudinal EFs and IQ data to determine whether each of the three separable EFs was a leading indicator of IQ and/or vice versa.

As shown in Figure 1, initial (t1) inhibitory control and working memory were negatively related to IQ six month later (t2) but attention shifting was not. The direction of the association changed for the next time interval (from t2 to t3). In addition, IQ (t2) became a significant predictor of inhibitory control (t3). Concurrent relations between EFs and IQ were found for attention shifting and inhibitory control at t1 and for working memory at t3.

Findings of an association between working memory and IQ in our study replicated results from previous studies with adult samples. In addition, the present results also suggest an association between inhibitory control and IQ in preschoolers. Results point to a changing pattern of the relations between EFs and IQ over time suggesting that the development of EFs and IQ might synchronize relatively late in early childhood.

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