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2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 513 words || 
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1. Burton, Olivette. "This Land is Your Land, This Land is My Land: The Ethical Juxtaposition of Land Grabbing and Its Violent Effects on Women and Children in Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559824_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This Land is Your Land, This Land is MY Land: The Ethical Juxtaposition of Land Grabbing and Its Violent Effects on Women and Children in Africa- Olivette Burton, Mbe MSW

Once again Africa is in crisis. The crisis does not stem from drought, or famine or even war although these situations abound in various African nations. The continent has been identified as the place to ease the burdens of countries with problems of exploding large urban populations but with no sufficient amount of land suitable to feed their exploding populations. Urbanization and the search for new sources of bio-fuel and rapid economic/technological progress in advancing countries is now a major source of concern for land activists and people concerned with the rights and welfare of indigenous populations.
Multinational corporations and larger countries are leasing African farmland for long periods of time, (some figures estimate leases up to 99.9 years) at a phenomenal pace. In Mali alone, there has been an estimated 800,000 acres of farmland that has been leased by multinationals and corporations. Among these, China which is in the midst of transitioning from a developing country into that of a westernized power, is foremost along with other countries such as Saudia Arabia, India and other middle-eastern states. Every aspect of life for growing populations such as China’s, has to be re-evaluated as the need increases and demands suitable infrastructure, maximized land use, adequate food provision and urban planning and design. Since creating the reforms of the 1970s, its focus has been on improving all aspects of its people including but not limited to improving the standard of living, health care, and lessening the disparities that now exist between rich and poor.
While it is a compliment to their leadership that China has become more sensitive to social human rights, there is much concern that the level of social and cultural sensitivity has not been manifested in its dealing with Africa, and the land that it has appropriated there. There is further concern that while China and other countries are doing all they can to raise the standard of living and restore the dignity of its women and children involved in business and agriculture African women and children have been placed at risk for possible increased violence and possible displacement.
The focus of this presentation examines the impact and consequences such leases can have on women and children in Africa and their survival. We also seek to look at the independent effects urbanization and long term land lease have on African and Chinese migration patterns and to what extent or lengths each go through to preserve their sense of identity. To the extent that there are any, we would like to analyze any parallels and relationships between migrant Chinese and the African communities they move into. Lastly, this presentation will suggest possible actions and plan to prepare a guideline for multinationals to ameliorate the impact of land leases in Africa for all involved by focusing on social responsibility and collaboration.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 12596 words || 
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2. Flaherty, Anne. "This Land is My Land: The Politics of Indian Land Claims Settlement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210611_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It can be difficult to explain how and why small, institutionally disadvantaged and excluded groups with few political or economic resources are able to win concessions and victories from the powerful. In the United States, despite a history of repeated dispossession, American Indian tribes have been able to win sometimes highly valuable land claims settlements and transfers of land title from the federal and state governments. This paper covers the changes that brought about the institutional opening for such claims to be considered as well as offering a causal argument for the varied outcomes of land claims cases. Settlements will only be a real possibility when there is strong legal pressure for the state and/or federal government to evaluate the claim. Further, while the costs of settlement terms are a large determining factor in whether or not a claim will reach settlement, there are other important variables involved. Stereotypes of the tribe as well as the social perceptions of the claim itself are significant in understanding settlement outcomes. Most important may be the tribal or claimant group cohesion, which is a strong indicator of the group's ability and willingness to pursue claims and negotiate to a settlement.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2007 - SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY Words: 206 words || 
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3. Manale, Andrew. and Hyberg, Skip (Bernt). "Reducing nutrient loadings by restoring ecosystem services on tile-drained lands: the costs and benefits of bundling working land practices with targeted land retirement." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Saddlebrook Resort, Tampa, Florida, Jul 21, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p174186_index.html>
Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Abstract: Upper Midwest tile-drained lands, by acting as a direct conduit, contribute significantly to nutrient loadings to surface waters . Solving the problem of Gulf Hypoxia and other major water quality problems will require improved conservation efforts targeted to these lands. Reducing these loadings is, however, complicated by the need for measures affecting most if not the entire drainage system and thus more than one field or farm. Wetland restoration within tile-drainage systems has been demonstrated to significantly reduce nitrate loadings, but also provides a suite of ecosystem services. Targeting the restoration of an array of ecosystem services, rather than focusing on just water quality improvement alone could, in part, offset the costs of intervention. An ecosystem services approach, however, will likely require a bundling of government cost-share assistance for land management practices with targeted land retirement—conservation measures that are adminstered by two different government agencies. Using the example of a major drainage district in the Midwest, the cost and the effectiveness to an array of ecosystem services of management practices associated with targeted land retirement are estimated. Potential sources of funding to cover their installation and maintenance costs are identified and policies and procedures to improve cross program coordination are discussed.

2010 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 156 words || 
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4. Stull, Emily. "This Land is My Land: The Religious and Ethnic Components of Land Clashes in Nigeria" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p439335_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: From 1990 to 2009, thousands of Nigerians died in clashes that erupted from disagreements over the ownership and usage of land. Most of these clashes occurred between nomadic cattle herdsmen and farmers. Both underlying and intensifying these conflicts are the ethnic and religious components. Long-lasting feuds between more than 250 different tribes in Nigeria continue to prevail, and many of these ethnic feud lines can be found between herdsmen and farmers. Further intensifying conflicts is the religious component, as the majority of nomadic herdsmen are Islamic and the majority of farmers are Christian. Religious violence in Nigeria between these two groups is severe, both in major cities and between tribes in rural areas, further fueling clashes. This paper utilizes a new dataset on political disorder in Africa to identify instances and locations of violent conflict over land in Nigeria and explores the intensifying effect of ethnic and religious cleavages.

2015 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 257 words || 
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5. Pecorella, Robert. "This Land is Your Land: the Public Role in American Land-Use Management" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Nov 12, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1050107_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in the Village of Euclid case, which ruled that zoning was a legitimate exercise of the states’ police powers, a vast majority of state legislatures delegated land-use management authority to their local governments. This rush to delegate is a result in part of the efforts of a conservative Republican Regime in power in Washington during this period (the Harding-Coolidge-Hoover years) to push land-use management (LUM) authority down to the smallest unit of government. After considering this mode of LUM in the context of larger market-based and state-power arguments concerning land policy, as exemplified by the competing perspectives of scholars like Elinor Ostrom and Myron Orfield, the paper examines three notable and countervailing Federal efforts to institute broader LUM programs by negating local government authority and encouraging state governments to develop and coordinate land-use planning initiatives. Specifically the paper focuses on the New Deals’ National Planning Board program of the 1930s, Senator Henry Jackson’s (D-Wash) proposal for a National Land-Use Policy Act in 1970, and the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations (ACIR) which operated until 1996. Each of these initiatives was designed to move land-use management from a locally focused “civic republican” policy to a broader “positive state” approach thereby increasing the range of stakeholders and the nature and sweep of issues included in land-use planning. The paper suggests that locally-controlled LUM has encouraged metropolitan sprawl and all its accompanying dysfunctions and that some form of state and national-centered LUM is necessary to address these problems going forward.

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