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2015 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 47 words || 
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1. Motobayashi, Kyoko. "Shifting subjectivity and language ideologies: From foreign language learners to native language teachers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, ON, Canada, Mar 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p963684_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper illustrates ways in which individual subjectivities are mediated by language ideologies, such as national, foreign, native, or heritage language, by tracing the life histories and shifting subjectivities of those who are on a trajectory to become heritage Japanese language teachers in Japanese diaspora communities abroad.

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 47 words || 
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2. Compton, Sarah. "American Sign Language as a Heritage Language: Pathways into Sign Language Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p700362_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the degree to which language shift is occurring in sign language communities. I consider for whom ASL is a heritage language and, drawing on Fishman’s (2001) framework, consider the number of signers within various domains drawing particular attention to signing communities’ language maintenance efforts.

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 47 words || 
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3. Jenks, Christopher. "One Conversation Two Languages: Alternating Bi-Language Talk and its Implications for Language Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p698337_index.html>
Publication Type: Colloquium Paper
Abstract: Using conversation analysis and autoethnography, this paper uncovers the sequential organization of Korean-English alternating bi-language talk (ABT), explores how competence can be incorporated into an understanding of language choice during bilingual conversations, and discusses how opportunities to learn Korean as a heritage language arise out of ABT.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Zaretsky, Elena. "Language and Literacy Behaviors of ELLs from Low SES: Language Disorder or Lack of Language Proficiency?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962171_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The population of ELLs in U.S. public schools continues to grow, with large number of ELLs disproportionally represented in special education. There is paucity of research examining the relationship between early literacy and language behaviors of ELLs in their L2 (English) compared to the monolingual peers and children with SLI (Goldstein, 2006). While ELLs may perform similarly to their monolingual peers on decoding and spelling, oral language complexity consistently lags behind (Uchikishi, 2005; Ucelli & Páez, 2007), suggesting lack of language proficiency, especially noticeable in children from low SES attending urban Title I schools. The lack of specific discriminating criteria for language and literacy acquisition among ELLs leads to over-identifying ELLs as language disordered.
The present study examined patterns in early literacy and narrative development of ELLs attending kindergarten in Title I school in order to differentiate ELLs from SLIs. Narratives are considered an important predictor of academic achievements among school-age children and establish a foundation for future literacy development (August & Shanahan, 2006), making it a valid assessment of oral language proficiency, an area of concern among children from different linguistic backgrounds. There are also common assumptions regarding the relationships between reading precursors, i.e., phonological awareness (PA), alphabet knowledge, phonological memory (PM) and vocabulary (Yesil-Daglii, 2011; Schatschneider et al., 2004; Muter, Hulme, & Snowling, 2004) and early reading achievements.
30 kindergartners participated in the study (Mage=5;7, SD=0.3). All children were assessed on reading precursors, as well as on early reading measures, i.e., sight words recognition, decoding and invented spelling. All children also produced recalled and elicited narratives based on picture stories. The narratives were recorded, transcribed and analyzed for type/token ratio (TTR) and Mean Length of Utterances (MLU), as measures of vocabulary knowledge and grammatical complexity.
Our results showed similar reading precursor profiles and early reading achievements between ELLs and monolingual peers of the same age, except for Rhyming task [(recognition and production) (t(58)=6.77, p=<.0001)]. Rhyming skills are known to relate to vocabulary development (Muter, Hulme & Snowling, 2004), suggesting that ELLs have significant deficits in vocabulary knowledge. Both, PA and alphabet knowledge added significantly to decoding and encoding in ELLs group (t=3.84, p=.0001 and t=5.52, p=<.0001 respectively), as seen in children with SLI, while monolingual peers relied on alphabet knowledge only (t=4.52, p=<.0001) (Zaretsky & Kuvac, in preparation). The results of narrative analysis suggested that recall paradigm is easier for ELLs than elicited narratives in terms of vocabulary items (F(3)=65.25, p=<.0001), with significantly larger TTR (t(46)=7.19, p=<.0001). However, MLU was higher for elicited narratives (t(46)=2.62, p=.01). Close examination of the use of grammatical morphemes suggested strong similarities with SLIs, as pointed out by Pradise (2005), and therefore possibility of mistaking ELLs for SLIs.
These results suggest that ELLs show the same pattern of grammatical morpheme acquisition as SLIs. However, nonword repetition can discriminate ELLs from SLIs: while deficit in nonword repetition (PM) is a clinical marker for SLIs (Conti-Ramsden, 2003), this is not true for ELLs, who may perform on this task similar to monolingual peers.

2017 - LRA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Yang, Lu., uchikoshi, Yuuko. and He, Neva. "Parental language use in storytelling and children’s language abilities in two languages: a study on children in dual immersion programs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA Annual Conference, Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel & Marina, Tampa, FL, Nov 28, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1273991_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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