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2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 12841 words || 
Info
1. Parkin, Michael. "Priming Image on Late Night: How Late Night Candidate Appearances Affect the Relative Weight of Image Considerations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85443_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This is an experimental study looking at how candidate appearances on late night television talk shows affect the relative saliency of image considerations in candidate evaluations and vote choices.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. O'Keeffe, Zachary. "The Late Night Bump: Evidence of Information Search About Political Guests After Late Night TV Appearances" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350453_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using Wikipedia page views and Google trends, I find that political actors enjoy hundreds to thousands-fold increases in Internet searches immediately after late-night TV interviews, demonstrating the power of soft news to spur interest in politics.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 10427 words || 
Info
3. Feldman, Lauren. and Young, Danna. "Late-Night Comedy as a Gateway to Traditional News: An Analysis of Time Trends in News Attention among Late-Night Comedy Viewers during the 2004 Presidential Primaries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152480_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: This paper challenges the assumption, advanced in recent survey data published by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press, that young audiences are abandoning traditional news as a source of election information in favor of late-night comedy programs. Instead, we offer evidence, consistent with Baum’s “gateway” hypothesis (2003), that exposure to late-night comedy increases attention paid to the presidential campaign in national network and cable news. Insofar as campaign news provides the context for the political jokes featured in late-night comedy monologues, late-night television appears to serve a socializing function, such that it motivates viewers to pay more focused attention to the campaign in hard news sources—perhaps so that they feel better equipped to enjoy the comedy. This analysis uses data collected via the National Annenberg Election Survey (NAES) during the 2004 presidential primary season, between October 30, 2003 and June 4, 2004. As hypothesized, cross-sectional results demonstrate that viewers of late-night comedy pay more attention to the campaign in national and network cable news than non-viewers, controlling for a variety of factors. Time series analysis also reveals that the rate of increase in hard news attention over the course of the primary season is greater for viewers of late-night comedy than for non-viewers.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 24 pages || Words: 10192 words || 
Info
4. McHugh, Mary. "Live from New York: The impact of Saturday Night Live and late night talk shows on the 2008 Presidential Election Race" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360378_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will explore how television comedy shows (Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, the Tonight Show and the Late Show) affected the 2008 Presidential Election Race. Due to the writers strike these shows were dark during the early primary races – leaving an intriguing void in the media coverage of the race. After the strike was settled, the coverage of the race seemed to change as did popular perception of the candidates. Saturday Night Live is getting high ratings based on its political skits and candidates seek out any opportunity to be a guest on a nightly show. Studies have shown that younger voters are getting their news more from Jon Stewart than from Brian Williams which means that these sketches and appearances have a great effect on how the public views the candidates and the election. This paper intends to consider these effects in the hopes of determining how much of an impact these shows have on the election and its results

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