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2012 - NLPA Biennial Conference Words: 159 words || 
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1. Zamarripa, Manuel X.. "A Qualitative Exploration of the Experiences of Latina/o Professors teaching Latina/o Psychology or Counseling Courses." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NLPA Biennial Conference, The Heldrich Hotel, New Brunswick, NJ, Oct 11, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p579579_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The teaching of Latina/o Psychology continues to sparsely offered in undergraduate and graduate education. Latina/os are now the larges ethnic minority in the U.S. and indications are that the population will continue to increase in number. There is little in the research that describes the experiences and reasons of those who teach this specialty course. The objectives of the current study include (a) examining the lived experiences of Latina/os teaching a Latina/o Psychology or Counseling course as well as (b) identifying meaningful experiences for these participants. A purposive sampling procedure will be used to select 12 participants from a national list of professors who have taught a Latina/o Psychology or Counseling course. This interview will consist of several open-ended questions. Follow-up questions will also be used, thereby creating a semi-structured interview format. Only participants who agree to be audio recorded will be eligible to participate. The researchers will use a phenomenological approach to identify common themes from participants' responses.

2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 502 words || 
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2. Cordova, Cary. "A Psychogeography of Latina/o Radicalism: The Politics of Latina/o Landscapes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p657139_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: The 2013 release of the National Park Service’s “American Latino Theme Study,” is a symbolic effort to redress the fact that “American Latino historic places currently are underrepresented in all official recognition programs at all levels.” As this document indicates, there is a growing mandate to commemorate Latinos in the physical landscape. The 2012 opening of the Cesar E. Chavez National Monument partly represents this official turn. The new site, run by the National Park Service, now serves as a key physical space to remember Chavez’s many achievements. Chavez casts a large shadow that can easily eclipse the role of other participants in Latina/o history. Many cities have named a street after Chavez, typically in proximity to a Latino neighborhood, much like the multitudes of Martin Luther King streets that connote African American neighborhoods across the country. Like King, Chavez is more easily consumed by mainstream America than Malcolm X, or Emma Tenayuca. My objective is not to undermine Chavez, but to use his demarcation in the landscape as a meaningful starting point for mapping the spaces and places that commemorate Latino activism across the nation. In drawing together distinctive official and unofficial landmarks of Latina/o activism – such as, “Plaza Sandino” in San Francisco; the Embassy Auditorium in Los Angeles; Teresa Urrea’s home in El Paso; Paseo Boricua in Chicago; and Sylvia Rivera Way in New York – I am initiating a comparative analysis of the iconography, representations, motivations, transnational politics, and silences that permeate these physical spaces.

While a variety of physical sites serve as important guideposts, it is equally important to examine the (strategic) absence of Latina/o representation in the landscape. Certain Latina/o narratives fly in the face of national poetics. For instance, how can the nation physically commemorate the “Day Without an Immigrant,” or the protests outside Immigration prisons, without commenting on immigration policies? Where do we remember the achievements and struggles of Ethnic Studies, when just as many legislative forces seek to compel its dissolution? How does the U.S. officially incorporate heroes, who also are cast as bandits, criminals, and murderers (Joaquin Murrieta, the Magón brothers, Pedro Albizu Campo, Lodlita Lebron, Reíes Lopez Tijerina, y más)? And how can the U.S. mark the activist presence of those that have fled from, or fought against U.S.-sanctioned violence? My work grapples with the borders of acceptability and assimilability of Latinas/os, or alternatively, with the unacceptability and radicalism of certain Latinas/os. My project is to cultivate a “psychogeography” of Latino radicalism, or, at least, to emulate some of the analytical impulses that led Guy Debord to coin the term. My work draws on David Romo’s recent efforts to historically wander through the complexities of El Paso; my interests are parallel, but less rooted in a single city. In juxtaposing diverse landscapes, demographics, and identities, I am mapping how Latinas/os can be seen, or not seen in the nation’s physical spaces.

2013 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 2463 words || 
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3. Hernandez, Frank., Murakami, Elizabeth., Cerna, Joseph., Medina, Venus. and Martinez, Gloria. "The Brown-Eyed Leaders of the Sun: Latina/o School Administrators Impacting Schools through Latina/o Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 04, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p673308_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study focuses on the relevance of Latina/o School Administrators Impacting Schools through a Latina/o Identity. Understanding Latina/o leaders entails understanding more about the definitions of leadership among communities of color, leadership succession, gender differences, as well as methods for recruitment, retention and development. Yet, for Latina/o school leaders, their personal histories, leadership challenges related to gender and race, contributions, responsibilities, and career aspirations, both personal and organizational, are undocumented in the school leadership research.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 1 words || 
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4. Cisneros, Josue. "Race, Rhetoric, and Resistance in Latina/o Struggles for U.S. Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p396720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2009 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1687 words || 
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5. Rodriguez, Jesús. "Education Sin Fronteras: Understanding Undocumented Immigrant Latina/o Students’ Experience of School Membership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Anaheim Marriott, Anaheim, California, Nov 19, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p378287_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explored undocumented immigrant Latina/o students’ experience of school membership / belonging. A phenomenological qualitative research design formed the basis of data analysis which provided the framework for a master narrative on the immigrant experience. The results of the research identified four exemplars: the master narrative of the immigrant experience, integration, the experience of frustration, and a profound sense of motivation and resiliency. The research has implications for undocumented students’ access to higher education.

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