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2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 108 words || 
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1. Morgan Consoli, Melissa. and Noriega, Erika. "Exploring Resilience in Self-Identified “Mixed” Latina/os. Melissa L. Morgan Consoli, Ph.D. University of California Santa Barbara Erika Noriega, M.A. University of California Santa Barbara" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558195_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This qualitative study explored resilience in Latina/o individuals of mixed identities. Specifically, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six self-identified Latino/a individuals, who also distinguished themselves as having mixed cultural/ethnic identities and had overcome an adverse event. Themes emerged through Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) methodology as to how individuals were able to face and resolve their difficult experiences and whether cultural background, contributed to their ability to overcome the identified challenge. Preliminary findings include domains that highlight the diversity of challenges experienced by participants, multi-cultural identity formation, and methods of overcoming challenges. Full results will be discussed in the presentation as well as limitations and Implications for future research.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Words: 150 words || 
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2. Erba, Joseph. "Exploring the Relationship Between Media Representations of Latina/os and the Self-Esteem of High-Achieving Latino College Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714724_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Despite recent improvements, Latina/os in the mainstream media are still depicted as a homogeneous, pan-ethnic group, and their representations are dominated by images of criminals and immigrants seeking public assistance. How do stereotypes and the lack of images of professionals, who could serve as role models, affect the self-esteem of Latino students? What coping mechanisms do they use to succeed in predominantly white universities where non-Latina/o students are mostly exposed to Latina/os as stereotypical characters in the media and as Spanish-speaking blue-collar workers on campus? This paper discusses the findings of in-depth interviews with 12 first-generation, U.S.-born, high-achieving Latino college students at a predominantly white public university. The paper addresses the role media played in these students’ self-esteem and the coping mechanisms they used to protect their self-esteem, which varied based on their level of ethnic identification. The paper also proposes strategies that could help Latino adolescents develop high self-esteem.

2004 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 7469 words || 
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3. Perez-Monforti, Jessica. "Rhetoric or Meaningful Identifiers? Latina/os and Pan-Ethnic Self-Identifiers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Portland, Oregon, Mar 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p88238_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An interdisciplinary debate is currently taking shape regarding the usefulness of pan-ethnic identities; scholars in the field of Political Science as well as fields focused on the study of people of color such as Black Studies, Latino/Chicano Studies, and/or Asian Studies are involved. They are asking and responding to questions surrounding the value of this type of ethnic self-identification. Whereas it is clear that there is evidence supporting the arguments for as well as against encouraging pan-ethnic identifiers, prior research has shown that a small number of Latino/as in the United States choose pan-ethnic identifiers such as Latino, Hispano, or Hispanic to classify their ethnic identity. This pan-ethnic identity has been named latinidad. While this paper forgoes the debate concerning the value of latinidad, it does ask questions about this group that represents approximately 34% of Latina/o respondents of the National Latino Political Survey (NLPS): do they comprise a politically, socially, or economically distinctive sub-group within the Latino population? If so, what specific characteristics or variables set them apart? Does the use of latinidad have significant political implications?

2011 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 252 words || 
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4. Larson, Eric. "Another Vietnam: Labor, Latina/os, and Central America Solidarity in New England in the 1980s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p509418_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: As historian Hector Perla has recently argued, scholarship about Central America solidarity in the 1980s only sometimes recognizes the crucial contributions of Latina/os, and especially exiles and refugees from political repression in places like Chile, Argentina, and Central America itself. In this paper I will examine the relationships between labor union and Latina/o activists as they worked to build grassroots, working-class international solidarity in the 1980s. The paper will focus on Boston, the center of the New England activity. Boston, in the aftermath of the Boston bussing riots, featured a fragmented Left that, in some ways, united around Central America solidarity. The groups involved included South and Central American exiles, the Central American Refugee Center, Quakers, white New Left veterans in the Massachusetts Labor Solidarity Committee, feminist organizations born in the 1970s, the City of Cambridge Human Rights Commission, and a nascent liberal left tied to the Democratic Party. At a time when the labor officialdom supported Reagan administration interventions in Central America, union activists in Boston joined with unionists across the country to demand change in the AFL-CIO. Because of racism and urban segregation, the increasing economic desperation of the Reagan era, and the changing U.S. and Central American political terrains of the late 1980s and early 1990s, solidarity relationships between labor, Latin Americans, and Latina/os in New England never fully developed. However, the strategies and discourses that these different Central America solidarity activists developed in the 1980s became, I show, some of the foundations of the 1990s-era anti-globalization movement.

2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 394 words || 
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5. Morales, Orquidea. "Chicanafuturism and Flying Sombreros: The “Alie(nation)” of Latina/os in the U.S." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p657040_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In “The Hispanic Challenge” Samuel P. Huntington describes the Latina/o “invasion” as a threat to American culture. Communities, he states, are being destroyed by the influx of immigrants who are unwilling and most importantly unable to assimilate. The invasion has started, according to Huntington, and something must be done to stop it before all is lost. His overarching question, “Will the United States remain a country with a single national language and a core Anglo-Protestant culture?,” is quickly answered by his xenophobic conclusion that if this problem is ignored the U.S. will quickly be divided and instead of having one united identity two cultures and two languages will prevail (32). The public discourse and hate rhetoric regarding Latina/os in the U.S. has created a false science fiction narrative where the “illegal alien” has become a dangerous enemy, invading physical as well as cultural borders. This linguistic and cultural “invasion,” according to Huntington, will tear the nation apart unless something is done to stop it. His rhetoric, not unlike many science fiction works, creates a climate of fear and paranoia that marks Latina/os, and specifically Mexicans and Mexican Americans, as alien invaders who must be stopped by any means necessary. It is this fear and paranoia, or more specifically, the response to it that by Chicana/o artists specifically Ruben Ortiz Torre and Lalo Cota that drives my research in which I look at the way they reapproriate the discourse of “alientation.”

In his artist statement accompanying the video “Alien Toy” Ruben Ortiz Torres explains “aliens have played an essential role even in the development of nationalistic art” since, he adds, many artists have made crucial artistic interventions when they are no longer “home.” Through the enforcement of these arbitrary borders and constant policing of the borderlands and its “alien” inhabitants it is they who racialize and “alienate” communities creating their own science fiction narratives of invading armies, pushing for a “Reconquista.” Artists like Ruben Ortiz-Torres and Lalo Cota--through a reappropriation of science fiction tropes and a reframing of current, as well as historical, uses of rhetoric of “fear”--have created a new Chicanafuturist aesthetic that is necessarily grounded in the spatial and temporal borderlands. I will discuss the importance of the alien in work by Chicana/os during times of heavy policing along the border by focusing on these artists and a deeper analysis of a Chicanafuturistic aesthetic.

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