Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,948 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 390 - Next  Jump:
2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8597 words || 
Info
1. Wilson, Walter. "Latino Representatives Legislating Latino Interests: Latino Interest Bill Sponsorship in the 109th Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362391_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Of more than 9,300 bills sponsored by representatives during the 109th Congress, I identify 47 explicitly-Latino interest bills, 211 implicitly-Latino interest bills, and 103 anti-Latino interest bills. Using a negative binomial regression model I examine whether Latino representatives sponsor more Latino interest Legislation than their non-Latino counterparts. Findings show that Latino representatives, with one exception, did not sponsor anti-Latino interest legislation. Latino representatives did not sponsor more legislation that implicitly addresses Latino interests than did non-Latino representatives. However, Latino representatives did sponsor more legislation that addresses Latino interests explicitly. In both cases, sponsorship of bills that address Latino interests varied positively with the size of Latino populations in congressional districts. These findings are significant given the important role such bills can play in raising new “Latino issues," in crystallizing Latino interests, and in enhancing a "Latino voice" in Congress.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 201 words || 
Info
2. Garcia-Rios, Sergio. "Latino Time and Latino Moments: A Study of Latino Identity Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1129248_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many scholars have studied the prevalence of racial and ethnic identities among members of minority groups, including African Americans, Latinos, and. However, the relationship between group identity and political attitudes and behavior has been hard to consistently reproduce, with some studies detecting strong and others finding weak or no. Ethnic identity poses an interesting challenge specially when studying immigrants. Thus, understanding Latino identity has become an essential part of (re)interpreting the American identity. This paper takes a historical view of Latino identity and places special emphasis on what I call “Latino moments”. To what extent have events such as 1986 IRCA, or the rallies in 2006 shaped Latino identity in the shot and long term? In order to test the impact of these and other “Latino Moments” I rely on a multi method approach using historical and archival documents as well as a unique repeated cross-sectional sample survey, the Latin American Immigrant Survey Composite (LAISC) which consists of survey data dating back to 1960 to 2006. Taking advantage of the numerous individual observations within a specific cohort and time period, I employ a hierarchical age period cohort analysis (HAPC) in the form of cross-classified nesting observations across time periods and cohorts.

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 438 words || 
Info
3. Martinez, Katynka. "The Latino Mayberry and other Fairy Tales: (re)producing Latino subjectivities through CNN’s “Latino in America” series" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p418085_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Transnational media corporations often relegate Latino audiences to the margins. However in October 2009 CNN foregrounded Latinos by launching its “Latino In America” series. The four-hour program aired during prime time over two days and was rebroadcast for weeks that followed. Although the series focused on Latinos living in the United States it is unclear whether CNN was speaking directly to this community or purporting to represent them to those unfamiliar with Latino experiences and concerns. Trying to answer this question becomes even more difficult when one considers the type of Latino news coverage that is commonly found on CNN. Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a national pro-immigration reform group, said: “The truth is that CNN already airs a nightly program on Latinos in America. It’s called ‘Lou Dobbs Tonight,’ and for 260 hours a year CNN provides air time for anti-immigrant distortions and anti-Latino propaganda.” While Latinos in America may seem like an antidote to Dobb’s xenophobic commentary and unsubstantiated claims regarding Latino criminality and disease, many viewers were critical of simplistic representations promoting a neoliberal agenda.

This study examines how one set of viewers (California Latino college students) made sense of the series against the context of their own experiences. Methodologically it draws from transcripts of in-class discussions at San Francisco State University. Additional interviews were identified by students through a snow-balling technique. Students watched the series and wrote response essays on representations of Latinidad on the program. Because most students in the class are from California, few were intimately familiar with the cities profiled on the series. The geographical and imagined distance created by the representations of Latinos in the series contributed to the production of ideological distance. Given their uniquely different and complex experiences as California Latinos, few of the students could relate to CNN’s idealistic, homogenizing, and safe narrative or even make sense of the series as “real” or “factual,” and many were quick to describe the series as a “fairy tale story.” When participants were asked about how they would choose to visually and narratively represent their California hometown, a majority wanted to address issues of immigration, journalistic fear mongering, and racial, sexual, and class stereotypes in television and film. These audiences wanted to see more nuanced and complicated discourses about themselves. My study concludes with the observation that Latinos are not passive and indiscriminant consumers of Latino-oriented cultural productions, but rather informed and critical publics. Examining how the intersection of differences such as geography, race, gender, class, and immigration history inform audience readings of the media, questions mainstream efforts to represent Latinidad through the safe commodification of non- threatening difference.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 390 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy