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2007 - The Law and Society Association Words: 213 words || 
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1. George, Erika. "The Place of the Private Transnational Actor in International Law: From Law Breakers to Law Makers? Multinationals and Human Rights, Understanding Corporate Self-Regulation as Soft Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, TBA, Berlin, Germany, Jul 25, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178122_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Globalization, presents a challenge to the conceptual foundation of international law as premised on state action and state responsibility. Powerful non-state actors operate pose significant theoretical and practical difficulties for international law. This paper offers an account of evolving trends in efforts to ensure compliance of multinationals with international human rights norms. Specifically, the paper advances a more expansive vision of the subjects and sources of international law in an effort to conceptualize the conduct of private transnational commercial actors as law making by tracking the trajectory of recent corporate social responsibility initiatives such as the U.N. Global Compact and the U.N. Norms on Business and Human Rights. The paper urges international lawyers to remain open to the possibility that private non-state actors may “make” law where law making is understood to be a process of communication creating authoritative norms for a given community of actors. Finally, the paper posits that the perceived governance gaps and democratic deficits which accompany certain aspects of globalization may be overcome by a critical appreciation for the ways in which non-state actors are engaged in functional law making through the recent proliferation of pledges by private corporate actors to embrace international development priorities and human rights principles when pushed by segments of civil society.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 35 words || 
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2. Herlihy, Mark. "'Global Administrative Law' as Law: Legal Theory and Ethical Visions of the Practice of Public International Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p415745_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since about 1990, global governance has been marked by the proliferation of functional regimes, dominated by expert practitioners in various disciplines, seeking to manage global problems, including trade, global warming, public health, food safety, devel

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 246 words || 
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3. "Is Justice a Flexible Concept or a Hard and Fast Law? Amnesty Laws and the Duty to Investigate Human Rights Abuses under International Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250950_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores the theoretical question of whether justice in post-transition societies is a flexible concept or a law under international treaties and custom. First, the paper addresses the basic theoretical debates surrounding amnesty laws: justice versus political expediency in peace negotiations and post-conflict situations (including jus post bellum arguments), as well as justice versus reconciliation during rebuilding. The paper then uses a positivist approach todetermine the level of compliance with the putative rule against amnesty laws, as well as whether the law states believe that it is international law (opinio juris). Through studies of numerous recent cases and an outline of related treaties, international cases and customary law, the paper determines that the rule against amnesty laws appears to be gaining strength with respect to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, particularly since the ICTY and ICTR. However, the study also notes that where political expediency is at its highest, even these crimes may be overlooked temporarily. However, the involvement of the ICC in Uganda suggests that there may be limits to the future use of amnesty provisions in peace agreements in cases where the ICC and UN have sway. Lastly, the paper argues that a neoliberal approach may be important for assessing how the growing rule against amnesty laws has changed payoff structures during negotiations, while the New Stream legal approach may be equally important for breaking down the inconsistencies in the dualistic theoretical debates between justice and expedience and justice and reconciliation.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 249 words || 
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4. Nasser, Salem. "National Law, Divine Law, and the Rule of Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236002_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Virtually all Arab and Islamic countries reserve a role for Sharia or Islamic Law in their legal systems. The relationship between national regulation and Sharia is a tense one for it involves two kinds of regulation which are different in their nature. Sharia is a normative system which regards itself as a god given and god-inspired all-encompassing regulation. Because its rules are to be observed by individuals and the community wherever they are to be found, and because subjects do indeed turn to Islamic Law to regulate some aspects of their lives and as a means to conflict resolution, Sharia defies national legal systems both in countries where Muslims are a minority and in Muslim countries. The challenge arises from the fact that national legal systems which operate within the territorial space of a state and whose norms are produced by the state’s institutions share the regulatory function with a legal system which purports to be universal, whose sources are divine and whose rules are thought to be eternal. The Rule of Law ideal relates to the possibility of evaluating the adequacy of legal orders and establishing whether legal orders comply with certain requirements. It is thought that the Rule of Law requires that the legal rules be open, clear, adaptable, and that legal institutions be effective. This presentation examines the difficulties for legal orders in which Sharia maintains an important place to comply with the criteria of the Rule of Law ideal that is conceived in this manner.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 36 words || 
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5. Rajkovic, Nikolas. "International Law and the Government of Justice: (Re)Conceptualizing the Rule ‘of’ Law as Rule ‘through’ Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p415510_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Three interwoven claims guide mainstream understandings of the ‘rule of law’ in the practice of international politics. First, international law has emerged as a significant factor in the actual and discursive practice of international affairs. Second,

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