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2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 251 words || 
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1. Doctor, Austin. "Follow the Leader: Rebel Leaders and Anti-Civilian Violence in Civil War, 1989-2014" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1213941_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Intrastate war produces a variety of personalities and characters in leadership roles. News media and policy-makers often place a great deal of emphasis on rebel leaders in conflict scenarios. However, scholars know very little about how and why rebel leaders are able impact the dynamics of armed intrastate conflict. We aim to bring leaders back into analyses of intrastate conflict by arguing that rebel leaders are important actors in dynamic situations of warfare, capable of influencing both the duration of the conflict, as well as the intensity. Therefore, we re-conceptualize leadership roles to offer a typology of rebel leaders based on two important dimensions: their motivations for conflict and their prior military experience. This paper also introduces the Rebel Leaders in Civil War Dataset (RLCW), which contains detailed information on over 200 rebel leaders across 80 intrastate conflicts from 1989 to 2014. RLCW codes the motivation for conflict and military experience of rebel leaders, the actions and characteristics of rebel organizations, and a number of structural factors known to shape the dynamics of violence in civil war. Initial analysis of this data, in which we regress levels of anti-civilian violence on rebel leader type, suggests that variation in rebel leader type has meaningful effects on the extent to which rebel organizations are able and willing to engage in civilian targeting. These encouraging results suggest the need for further theoretical and data-gathering efforts to better understand the role of rebel leaders in intrastate conflict.

2016 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Ledesma, Janet. "Resilience and the Leader (How Conceptual Models on Resilience Help Me as an Educational Leader)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Detroit Marriott Renaissance Center, Detroit, Michigan, Nov 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1161705_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will discuss how principals can be resilient in the midst of their complex roles. Through a thorough discussion on the conceptual frameworks and research models on resilience theory, the topic will be explored. Resilience is defined as the ability to bounce back from adversity; essential for the effective principal. The literature will demonstrate a direct relationship between the stress of the principalship and the ability to maintain resilience during prolonged contact with adversity.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 466 words || 
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3. Berger, Ronit. "What Drives Terrorist Leaders and How Different Are They from State Leaders?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119106_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Leaders matter. However, not all leaders are the same and they do not matter the same in every situation and under every circumstance. Leaders have the power to influence the way a situation plays out both immediately, but more importantly, over the long-term, when their own perception and behavior changes. However, not all leaders are in fact capable of changing over time. And when they do change, not all leaders change in the same manner and respond similarly to the changing circumstances. This paper is focused on one type of leaders, those of terrorist or simply violent non-state actors and is interested in exploring what drives such leaders and how different are those drivers from those of other types of leaders, particularly, state leaders.

This paper focuses on the interaction between the different parties to the Northern Ireland conflict. Utilizing the technique of assessing leadership at a distance (LTA) and with the help of the QDA program Atlas.ti I examine the world views, orientation and drivers of the different terrorist leaders and compare them to those of the state leaders and to the leaders of the non-violent non-state actors. Using over 180 speeches and interviews given by the different leaders in the Northern Ireland case, I am able to compare the terrorist leaders from one side of the conflict to the other regarding several shared central themes. More importantly, I can compare the central tendencies of all terrorist leaders in the conflict to those of the state leaders in the conflict. Additionally, I look into the leaders of non-violent non-state actors, especially those of the SDLP, in trying to decipher whether they are more similar to the terrorist leaders or to the state leaders.
Lastly, I compare the results of the terrorist leaders in the Northern Ireland conflict to Hermann’s baseline (Hermann, 2006; Hermann & Sakiev, 2011), first to the norming group of terrorist leaders and second to the norming group of European Leaders. This last section of the paper will determine whether and to what extent the results from the Northern Ireland case are in fact generalizable to other cases of terrorist leaders.

The analysis presented in this paper improves our understanding of terrorist leaders and answers a central question: how different are terrorist leaders and those who support the use of violence in pursuit of political ends, from those who use the accepted channels and institutions for voicing their constituents’ claims, and more simply, from those who already have the power? Better understanding of terrorist leaders, what makes them tick, so to speak, will help policy makers in devising appropriate policy prescriptions. The paper thus ends with some recommendation for better policy making when it comes to combating terrorism and defeating those who use violence against civilians in their pursuit of power and influence.

2017 - BALAS Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Adriasola, Elisa., Reyes Ahumada, Valentina G.. and Bravo, Diego. "Leader Identity Self-concordance: Facilitating Positive Leader Development Trajectory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BALAS, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile, Apr 05, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1224025_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To address the need for a more inclusive leader development theory, we extend the existent model by incorporating leader identity self-concordance as an antecedent of a positive leadership trajectory. We propose that, through a mechanism of top-down and bottom-up activation, a high leader identity self-concordance will positively impact on the development of leader self-complexity, leader self-efficacy, and self-awareness, and therefore, enhance the development trajectory of leaders.

2017 - 19th Annual ILA Global Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Ellis, Brendon., Reichard, Becky. and Priest, Kerry. "Am I a Leader? Development of Leader Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 19th Annual ILA Global Conference, TBA, Brussels, Belgium, Oct 11, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1261449_index.html>
Publication Type: Refereed Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to longitudinally examine the relationship between leader identity and implicit leadership theories (ILTs) in 276 first-year college students. We found civic engagement during high school and leader development activities during college predicted leader identity and ILTs beyond ACT scores and gender.

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