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2017 - Leading Learning for Change - AECT Words: 118 words || 
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1. Tu, Chih., Cornell, Richard., McIsaac, Marina S.., Doyle, Robert., Pan, Cheng Chang (Sam). and Yeh, Hsin-Te. "Using Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, Personalized Learning to Enhance Teaching & Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Leading Learning for Change - AECT, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, Florida, Nov 07, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1258695_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: ICEM-USA’s 10th annual graduate student panel discussion is a collaborative session to provide graduate students from all over the world a platform to share their research and practices in emerging technologies. Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, and Personalized Learning has been selected as the key discussion topic for AECT 2017. Graduate students in educational technology are frequently the earliest adopters of learning technologies. Their ideas, perceptions, applications, practices, and research are valuable to share with academic communities to shed light on Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, and Personalized Learning. Four to six student panelists will be selected from all over the world. A facilitator and four commentators, who are ICEM-USA professional members, will comprise this panel discussion.

2013 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 750 words || 
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2. Chadd, Julie. and VanGunten, Dawn. "Service Learning: Making Connections Between Classroom Learning and Real World Problems to Create Lifelong Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia, Feb 15, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p600736_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This session details service learning projects conducted by pre-service teachers, how these experiences help students learn about themselves, others, and the world, and their impact on attitudes about cultural differences.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Bemis, Rhyannon., Leichtman, Michelle., McComas, Megan., Meunier, Lynly., Palencia, Jewellianna. and Michaels, Danielle. "“Did you Just Learn That?” Children’s Recall of Learning After Naturalistic Learning Events" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958457_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Preschool children’s developing ability to recognize the source of their own learning has been investigated in laboratory tasks (e.g., Taylor, Esbensen, & Bennett, 1994; Tang, Bartsch, & Nunez, 2007) and interviews (e.g. Bemis, Leichtman, & Pillemer, 2011). However, few studies have explored children’s ability to accurately report on their own learning in naturalistic contexts, where facts are acquired during engagement in rich, multisensory activities. Bemis, Leichtman, and Pillemer (2013) exposed children to two different naturalistic learning events on different days and asked children to recall how they learned facts from these events in a single interview a week later. Results indicated that children as young as four years were capable of identifying the source of their own learning, but accuracy was lower than in laboratory tasks with simpler, more sanitized learning conditions, testing after only a single learning session, and often shorter delays. The present study explored whether children’s ability to identify the source of their learning in the same naturalistic events would improve if children were interviewed immediately after each event, effectively shortening the delay and simplifying recall demands, and compared performance on this naturalistic task with performance on a comparable laboratory task.

Thirty-two children, ages 3 to 6 years, participated in a three-session study. During the first two sessions, children participated in two staged learning events in groups of 3-5 age-matched peers. Immediately following each event, children were interviewed by a naïve experimenter and asked five questions (3 about facts learned in the staged event and 2 about general factual information). Children were asked to provide a factual answer to each question and then were asked 1) if they knew the answer or had guessed and 2) if they indicated knowing the answer, whether they remembered the moment they learned it or did not. Each staged event and interview was separated by a one-week delay. Two weeks following the second staged event and interview, children completed the replication of the Taylor et al. (1994, experiment 4) task so that performance across tasks could be compared.

Results indicated that, contrary to predictions, using an immediate delay hindered children’s performance, particularly for the youngest children. Only 19% of four-year-olds and 56% of five-year-olds reported at least one memory where they accurately identified the staged event as the source of their knowledge, compared to 50% of four-year-olds and 67% of five-year-olds in Bemis et al.’s (2013) study with a one-week delay; this despite the fact that children in both studies claimed to remember the moment they learned the answer at equal rates. Consistent with Bemis et al. (2013), the majority of memories were coded as either being about specific one-moment-in-time events or “consistent with specific” (probably about a specific event, but lacking sufficient detail) (see table 1). Finally, similar to Bemis et al. (2013), the number of accurate memories children provided was positively correlated with their performance on the Taylor et al. (1994, experiment 4) task, r(29) = .372, p=.04. These results indicate that interviewing children immediately after learning occurred hindered their ability to accurately recall the source of their learning.

2015 - Accelerate Learning: Racing into the Future - AECT Words: 55 words || 
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4. Park, Inwoo. and Kim, Se-Ryon. "Effects of students’ e-learning readiness, teaching presence on learning effects in an online learning environment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Accelerate Learning: Racing into the Future - AECT, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, Indiana, Nov 03, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1018190_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of the study was to investigate the students’ e-learning readiness and teaching presence influencing to learning effects(learner participation, learning satisfaction, perceived achievement). The data collected from 287 students of K cyber high school were analyzed with a correlation and multiple regression analysis. It was found that there were mediating effects among the variables.

2004 - APSA Teaching and Learning Conference Pages: 11 pages || Words: 3290 words || 
Info
5. Harkness, Suzan. "To Learn or Not to Learn, That IS the Question: Assessment in Problem Based Critical Incident Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Teaching and Learning Conference, NA, Washington, DC, Feb 19, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117477_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The problem-based critical incident technique, pioneered by Dr. John Flanagan, an industrial psychologist has been used since the early 1940s in a wide variety of situations. Typically, interviews or small groups are used to collect data, although more recently, the technique has been applied to classroom groups and small seminars in the form of writing exercises. Respondents are asked to provide possible solutions to posed events or problems and to provide feedback about their understanding of the class content, problem or event, text reading, or occupational experiences. Analysis and assessment of responses has helped to uncover the dynamics influencing successful performance, and can be used as direct evidence of what students are learning. Furthermore, this technique has the potential to be especially helpful in developing guidelines for learning outcomes and academic excellence. This study has developed two critical incidents that can be used in the political science classroom as a means to evaluate student learning (outcome assessments) as both direct evidence and indirect evidence. These assessments address issues of learning outcome in diverse classrooms with a focus upon inequity and diverse learning styles. These instruments can be used across the global sphere in on-line educational courses to gap the divide that a virtual classroom brings to the educational experience.

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