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2017 - Leading Learning for Change - AECT Words: 118 words || 
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1. Tu, Chih., Cornell, Richard., McIsaac, Marina S.., Doyle, Robert., Pan, Cheng Chang (Sam). and Yeh, Hsin-Te. "Using Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, Personalized Learning to Enhance Teaching & Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Leading Learning for Change - AECT, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, Florida, Nov 07, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1258695_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: ICEM-USA’s 10th annual graduate student panel discussion is a collaborative session to provide graduate students from all over the world a platform to share their research and practices in emerging technologies. Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, and Personalized Learning has been selected as the key discussion topic for AECT 2017. Graduate students in educational technology are frequently the earliest adopters of learning technologies. Their ideas, perceptions, applications, practices, and research are valuable to share with academic communities to shed light on Learning Analytics, Adaptive Learning, and Personalized Learning. Four to six student panelists will be selected from all over the world. A facilitator and four commentators, who are ICEM-USA professional members, will comprise this panel discussion.

2017 - Leading Learning for Change - AECT Words: 74 words || 
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2. Dawson, Kara., Antonenko, Pavlo., Wang, Jiahui. and Luo, Wenjing. "Multimedia learning and dyslexia: Learning processes, learning outcomes and individual differences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Leading Learning for Change - AECT, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, Florida, Nov 07, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1263909_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Dyslexia is the most commonly identified learning disability across all literate countries yet research related to this population and multimedia learning is limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze four multimedia conditions with dyslexic learners using learning performance outcomes, measures of neurocognitive individual differences and alpha event-related desynchronization percentage (ERD%). Results can be used to inform design of multimedia environments and contribute to our understanding of how individual differences influence multimedia learning.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 731 words || 
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3. Li, Shengru., Yamaguchi, Shinobu., Takada, Jun-Ichi. and Sukhbaatar, Javzan. "The effects of interactive learning materials on self-regulated learning and learning outcome in the case of Mongolian primary school teachers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, Mar 25, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1348720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: 1. Introduction
Interactive learning materials that support self-regulated learning (SRL) are considered to promote learner’s learning and its results (Hwang & Vrongistinos, 2002; Kuo, Walker, Schroder, & Belland, 2014). In Mongolia, multiple policies support the use of ICT for in-service teachers’ professional development, such as Education Master Plan (2006), ICT in Education Policy Action Plan (2012 - 2016), and ICT Vision 2021. Since 2015, Tokyo Institute of Technology has been collaborating with Mongolian National University of Education (MNUE) to produce interactive teacher training materials in three core primary school subjects, namely, Man and Environment, Man and Society, as well as Art and Technology.
2. Research objective
This study aims to identify the influence of interactive materials on effects of self-regulated learning processes to learning outcome.
3. Conceptual framework
This study applies self-regulated learning (SRL) theory. SRL refers to self-generated thoughts, feelings, and actions that are planned and cyclically adapted to the attainment of personal goals (Pintrich, 2000; Schraw, Crippen, & Hartley, 2006; Zimmerman, 1990). There are four SRL processes during learning: cognition, metacognition, motivation, and resource management (Pintrich, 2000; Schraw et al., 2006). These four SRL processes are affecting learning outcomes (Pintrich, 2000). In this study, affective outcomes, specifically, learning satisfaction and intention to apply knowledge are operationalized in measuring learning outcomes (Pintz & Posey, 2013; Zhao & Namasivayam, 2009). Pintrich asserts that SRL is not a fixed trait of the learner, instead, it may change depending on the different learning contexts (Pintrich, 2000). In this study, the use of interactive materials serve as a contextual factor that may influence the effects of SRL processes to learning satisfaction and intention to apply knowledge.
4. Research design and data source
This study applies two groups experimental design where two groups of teachers were formulated in receiving teacher training. Teachers in treatment group conduct self-development with interactive teacher training materials, teacher training guideline and teacher training videos. Teachers in control group conduct self-development using teacher training guideline and teacher training videos only. Treatment group consists 164 teachers from 15 schools while control group consists 134 teachers from 14 schools. “Motivated Strategies for Learning Outcome Questionnaire (MSLQ)” is identified and localized to measure motivation and learning strategies for SRL processes. Learning satisfaction survey and training effectiveness survey were selected to measure learning outcome (Pintz & Posey, 2013; Zhao & Namasivayam, 2009). It is measuring learner’s satisfaction with learning contents in distance learning context. Responses to these questionnaires are measured with 7-point Likert scale.
5. Analytical methods and findings
The data collection took place in September, 2016. Data analysis include four steps: 1) data input and data cleaning; 2) factor analysis for ensuring data validity, construction of latent variables and verification of the reliability of these variables; 3) moderated multiple linear regression analysis to identify the influence of interactive materials on effects of self-regulated learning processes to learning outcome. Factor analysis identifies five latent variables corresponding SRL processes, namely, internal motivation, motivation for better assessment, critical and positive thinking skills, planning and organizing skills, and effort regulation. There is also one latent variable corresponding to learning outcome, namely, learning satisfaction and intention to apply learning contents. Based on factor analysis result, research question is formulated: Does the use of interactive materials affect the relationship between learning satisfaction and intention to apply learning contents with internal motivation, motivation for better assessment, critical and positive thinking skills, planning and organizing skills, as well as effort regulation?
Through moderated multiple linear regression analysis, it is found out that two variables’ effects on learning satisfaction are statistically significantly moderated by the use of interactive materials. First, the use of interactive material moderates the effect of internal motivation on learning satisfaction. With the same level of internal motivation, teachers’ learning satisfaction and intention to apply learning contents is higher in treatment group than in control group. Second, the use of interactive material moderates the effect of motivation for better assessment on learning satisfaction and intention to apply learning contents. For teachers in treatment group, higher motivation for better assessment will result in higher learning satisfaction. However, for teachers in control group, higher motivation for better assessment will result in less learning satisfaction. These findings are supplemented by teachers’ input and opinion verifying the study results.
6. Significance of study
This study provides empirical support for self-development activities that are crucial for in-service teachers, in which self-regulated learning processes can be promoted and produce better learning outcome under the influence of interactive learning materials especially in the developing region.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 599 words || 
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4. Fonseca, Jodie. "The LEARN project: Lessons learned from an impact evaluation of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1353291_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This panel presentation will share experiences and lessons learned from an impact evaluation of the Lao Educational Access, Research and Networking (LEARN Project), implemented by Plan International in partnership with Save the Children International in Lao PDR. LEARN is an action research project that aims to test the effectiveness and scalability of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning that target populations that are typically difficult to reach, including ethnic villages in remote, mountainous areas in the north of the country. The project is designed to build rigorous evidence of that can inform Government of Lao policymaking and resource allocation in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals and equitable, quality learning for all.

To build this evidence base, LEARN is collaborating with research partner American Institutes for Research (AIR) to conduct a longitudinal study of child development and school readiness that compares outcomes of children in two treatment groups to children in a no-intervention control group as well as children who are enrolled in the government of Lao PDR's existing pre-primary class. The same panel of children is assessed at baseline, prior to enrollment in any school readiness intervention; at mid-term at the start of grade 1, immediately after the main interventions conclude; at endline, at the end of grade 1, to assess how gains from the interventions have held up during the course of the school year; and finally at follow-up at the start of grade 2, to assess if the interventions have been effective in promoting on-time enrollment in second grade.

The LEARN impact evaluation utilizes the Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes (MELQO) child assessment tool, developed by a global consortium of agencies active in education and child development. This tool was first adapted for use in Laos by the Ministry of Education and Sports and the World Bank, with a funding contribution from Dubai Cares through the LEARN Project. The tool assesses a range of child development and school readiness domains, including emergent literacy and numeracy and executive function. Children are assessed both in Lao, the national language of instruction, and in their home language if Lao is not their mother tongue. The child-level tool is complemented by an assessment of parent/caregiver knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding their children's learning and development, as well as an observation of teaching and learning practices in the classroom.

Baseline data collected in 2016 on 1,554 children (795 girls, 759 boys) from across 135 communities indicate that children have very low initial levels of school readiness, although they perform better when assessed in their home language than in the language of instruction. Children in the target villages experience high levels of stunting and limited access to reading materials in the home. In general, girls and boys performed at similar levels on the assessment tasks, while Lao-speaking children fared much better overall than non-Lao speaking children. Mid-term data collection will be completed in late 2017 and preliminary findings should be available in time to share during the conference in March 2018.

This panel will present the methods, findings and lessons learned to date in this impact evaluation. In particular, the panel will share the real-world challenges associated with implementing a rigorous, multi-year evaluation in a challenging context, with low population density, rugged mountain terrain, and multiple language-related barriers. The panel will also delve into the challenges of assessing children's emergent literacy in traditional domains such as letter knowledge and phonological awareness, when the languages being assessed are alpha-syllabic in structure. Finally, the panel will share considerations for other organizations considering implementation of similar evaluations in analogous contexts.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 77 words || 
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5. Hay, Ellen. "The Capstone Experience: What are Students Learning? What are Faculty Learning about Student Learning?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p365753_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The fifth panelist presents the benefits of a thematic approach. One of the more frequent assessment resources for many communication departments is the senior capstone experience. Capstones provide an academic setting where students transition from their undergraduate program into their “next step” beyond graduation. A thematic capstone which examines leadership as a principle and as a communicative act provides students an understanding of how leadership is linked to what we achieve and how we make those achievements.

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