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2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 42 words || 
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1. Tsai, Hsiao-Mei. and Sung, Ko-Yin. "Exploring Learner Errors, Teachers' Corrective Feedback (CF), Learner Uptake and Repair, and Learners' Preferences of CF" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p682623_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explored learner errors, teachers' oral CF, learner uptake and repair, and learners' CF preferences in a Chinese language classroom setting. Two Chinese language classes, one beginner and one advanced, at an university in southwestern United States participated in the study.

2009 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: 5 pages || Words: 944 words || 
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2. Crawford, Caroline., Martin, Sylvia. and Fleres, Carol. "We've Reached a Tipping Point: Learning to Teach within Face-to-Face, Hybrid and Online Environments, to Support the Learner within the Social Community of Learners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Dallas, Dallas, TX, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p277589_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Abstract: Training professional educators within 21st Century learning environments is imperative, so as to meet learning objectives and engage learners within face-to-face, hybrid and online social communities of learning environments.

2013 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 47 words || 
Info
3. Abing, Jesse. "VP-adverb Placement in the Spanish of Second Language Learners and Heritage Language Learners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Sheraton Dallas, Dallas, Texas, Mar 16, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p626577_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the placement of VP-adverbs by first language Spanish speakers, Spanish heritage language learners and English speaking second language learners. The results from this study demonstrate a significant difference in the intuitions of the various groups and varied acceptability results dependent on learner-learner grouping.

2012 - AECT International Convention Words: 73 words || 
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4. Reinhart, Julie. "DDL-R11 Progressing from Reluctant Online Learner to an Engaged Online Learner" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, The Galt House, Louisville, KY, Oct 30, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575109_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Participants at this round table session will discuss online learning strategies that facilitators can use to engage the reluctant online learner. Contemporary research has shown that online learners need much more than social presence in order to achieve higher-order learning. Participants of this round table will discuss many different instructional strategies that can be used to inspire the reluctant online learner to be engaged and learn in the online course.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Meng, Christine. "Social-Emotional Functioning and Kindergarten Academic Skills: Dual Language Learners Versus Non-Dual Language Learners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957792_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Children who demonstrate social skills and positive learning behaviors without disruptive behavioral problems are more likely to perform better academically (Eggum-Wilkens, Fabes, Castle, Zhang, Hanish, & Martin, 2014; Spira & Fischel, 2005). Prior research in this area is more likely to sample monolingual children to study the effect of social-emotional functioning on academic performance. As the number of children who are dual language learners (i.e., learning two or more languages at the same time) increases every year, it is crucial to understand the social-emotional functioning and academic performance of dual language learners compared to non-dual language learners. The language interactions within cultural contexts and the exposure to multiple languages provide unique experiences to the development of social-emotional functioning and academic performance of dual language learners. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the effect of social-emotional functioning on kindergarten academic skills differed between dual language learners and non-dual language learners.

The present study used a nationally representative sample of three- and four-year-old Head Start children. Data collected at Head Start program entry in fall 2003 and in the first year of kindergarten in spring 2006 were used for analyses. The sample included 372 dual language learners and 1,347 non-dual language learners enrolled in Head Start programs. Kindergarten reading skills were measured using the combined subtests of Letter-Word Identification and Word Attack. Kindergarten mathematics skills were measured using the combined subtests of Applied Problems and Quantitative Concepts. Social skills at program entry were assessed using items from the Personal Maturity Scale and the Social Skills Rating System. Behavioral problems at program entry were assessed using items from the Personal Maturity Scale, the Child Behavior Checklist for Preschool-Aged Children, the Teacher Report, and the Behavior Problems Index. Learning behaviors at program entry were assessed using a teacher-report measure of the Preschool Learning Behavior Scale. Parental literacy involvement, parent literacy skills in English and native language, and the children’s emerging literacy skills at program entry, and demographic variables were included as covariates.

Results of the hierarchical multiple regression revealed that Head Start children’s dual language learner status significantly predicted kindergarten reading skills. Dual language learners scored lower on kindergarten reading and mathematics skills than non-dual language learners. The interaction between dual language learner status and social skills emerged as a significant predictor for Head Start children’s kindergarten reading skills after controlling for the covariates (Ɓ = -.58, p < .01). Given that the significant negative interaction term emerged, post-hoc probing of the significant interaction term was conducted. Results from the post-hoc probing of the interaction term revealed that social skills were more positively associated with kindergarten reading skills for non-dual language learners than dual language learners. The present study demonstrated that Head Start dual language learners are at a disadvantage to acquire kindergarten academic skills, specifically reading skills, compared to non-dual language learners. Results have implications for early education intervention programs to facilitate dual language learners’ social-emotional skills as a pathway to improve kindergarten academic skills.

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