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2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 51 pages || Words: 13993 words || 
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1. Kittilson, Miki. and Gray, Mark. "Feeling Left Out by the Left? Left Party Economic Performance and Voter Turnout in Comparative Perspective, 1950 to 2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41445_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In many advanced democracies predictable differences between parties in government have become more difficult to discern. We argue that in response to a less observable structure in electoral politics, citizens are less engaged in the democratic process. We test the hypothesis that fewer party differences in economic policy and outcomes dampens electoral participation rates. Based on aggregate-level data from 19 OECD democracies from the 1950s to 2000, we find the highest turnouts occur in elections where voters can discern differences in party control of unemployment based on long-term historical record. Even after controlling for different electoral systems, state structure, and election procedures, three factors-- unions, Labor parties, and Left party performance on unemployment-- create a context conducive to higher levels of turnout.

2006 - The Law and Society Association Words: 225 words || 
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2. Palley, Elizabeth. "No Child Left Behind and the Children Left Behind" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Jul 06, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p95401_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will explore the implications of current federal education policy for children who are educationally “at risk.” It will also present the results of a study which examined the overlap and conflict between the No Child Left Behind legislation and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Based on the results of a recent study, this paper will examine the resources and challenges that federal education policy and funding affords children in public schools. This study seeks to provide the audience with an overview of the implementation challenges of this federal education policy.

This presentation will be divided into sections. In the beginning the presenter will explain the legal rights children are entitled to receive as a result of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the rights that children are accorded based on No Child Left Behind. Next, she will present the results of a small study involving 20 local level implementers who provide services under the regulations for both No Child Left Behind and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This study examines the limitations that exist in the implementation of both policies as a result of under-funding, poor oversight, racial disparities and the contradictions inherent in the goals of the reviewed federal legislation. Based on these findings, the presenter will provide recommendations for policy changes.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Yavas, Mustafa. "Blurring the Boundaries between Left and Islam(ism) in Turkey: the Left-wing Islamists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on an emerging social movement in Turkey that I call left-wing Islamism and gives a theoretically-informed description of how the left-wing Islamists form and negotiate their collective identity. I introduce boundary theories into social movements literature and utilize it to study curious identity processes navigating between antithetical pre-existing identities. In addition to how the left-wing Islamists construct their “others” via exclusionary boundary-work, the paper elaborates on the mainstream boundaries between leftists and Islamists, and how the movement actors attempt to blur these boundaries in the course of building their collective identity. In order to blur the symbolic boundaries, they rely on i) introducing Islamists’ tactical repertoires into the left and adopting leftists’ repertoires simultaneously; ii) intellectual efforts synthesizing the commonalities of the two and articulating it anew; and iii) claiming explicitly both identities. The ways in which they try to blur the social boundaries are i) identifying common enemies and urgent situations to act upon collectively; ii) establishing informal networks covering both leftists and Islamists; and iii) creating “free spaces” on the basis of common values and struggles.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Bremer, Bjoern. "The Missing Left? The Response of Left-Wing Parties to the Great Recession" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125366_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current economic crisis in Europe has also caused a crisis of social democracy. Following a brief period of “emergency Keynesianism” shortly after the 2008 financial crisis, governments have implemented austerity policies across Europe that have challenged the European welfare state. How have left-wing parties responded to these developments that have challenged their raison d’être? This paper examines the issue salience and policy positions of left-wing parties in eight countries in Northern and Southern Europe (France, Germany, Ireland, United Kingdom, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain). Using novel data on the positions that parties adopt during electoral campaigns through quantitative content analysis of national newspapers, it compares the electoral strategies of center-left and radical left-wing parties before and after the crisis. On the one hand, the paper tests the hypothesis that the crisis has (again) increased the salience of economic issues as opposed to cultural issues. On the other hand, it tests the hypothesis that center-left parties have shifted (back) to the left in the context of the crisis. These effects partly reverse previous trends, but the depth of the economic crisis and the structure of party competition are important mediators: while the trend is stronger in crisis-ridden countries, the effect is weaker in countries where radical right-wing parties are the main challengers for center-left parties (e.g. France and Great Britain). In the latter case, cultural issues like immigration are more salient and center-left parties adapt more centrist policies during electoral campaigns. This increased the gap between center-left and radical left-wing parties and, hence, limited the ability of the political left to be a united force in response the Great Recession.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 300 words || 
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5. Feierherd, German. "Left Behind: Why Governments of the Left Relax Labor Law Enforcement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1124667_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many developing countries have rigid labor regulations; yet de facto protection of workers tends to be strikingly weak. Firms frequently deny workers key labor rights inscribed in labor codes, such as the right to an eight-hour workday or a safe work environment. In this paper, I counter the conventional wisdom that governments of the left are more likely to enforce protections for workers by enhancing labor enforcement (e.g., investing in stronger inspectorates or increasing the number inspections). Instead, I argue that left governments enforce labor law less than governments of the right, as a means of satisfying competing electoral demands advanced by workers with different labor-market risks. Some workers -- those in formally protected jobs (the “insiders”) -- demand protections that increase the cost of labor and reduce employment opportunities for the large pool of informal and unemployed workers (the “outsiders”). Left governments, in their attempt to preserve the job benefits of their core insider constituency and, simultaneously, create employment opportunities for unskilled workers, facilitate the emergence of precarious forms of employment by favoring a more lax approach to enforcement. I distinguish the preferences of left and right governments, unions, and workers (insiders and outsiders) for different components of labor law and how their enthusiasm for enforcement varies according to economic conditions, sectoral characteristics, and the regulatory powers in the hands of labor inspectors. Using original, country-level panel data from Latin America and a regression discontinuity design in close mayoral races in Brazil, I show that the left invests less in stronger labor inspectorates, conducts fewer inspections, and reduces the productivity of labor inspectors, compared to their right-wing counterparts. Using municipal- and firm-level data, I show that left governments rely heavily on unions, who only represent the insiders, to negotiate employment conditions with their employers, instead of beefing up enforcement.

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