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2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 284 words || 
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1. Wavreille, Marie-Catherine. "Do Reelection and Policies Drive Legislators in Direct Legislation Campaigns?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-04-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1124912_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the last two decades, the literature has highlighted the growing involvement of elected officials, political parties, and candidates in direct legislation elections in the United States. In spite of the fact that the sponsorship and support of ballot measures are generally the purview of interest groups, recent empirical evidence suggest that candidates and parties have increasingly turned to the direct legislation process and supported ballot measures as a means to set the agenda and to provide themselves with popular issues to win elections. Yet, we know little about the incentives driving political elites to take over ballot proposition campaigns. In this paper, we ask the following question: How do contextual and institutional factors shape political elites’ decisions to campaign in direct legislation?

While studies devoted to the link between elected officials and direct legislation are becoming more frequent, few if any have moved beyond case studies. This paper tries to bridge this gap by providing a comparative perspective. Focusing on legislators sitting in chambers in eight states with heavy use of direct democracy, this paper integrates the theory articulated by Richard Fenno (1973) and tests whether two of the incentives he developed in his study of congressional committees hold in direct legislation campaigns. The first motivation concerns reelection while the second deals with making good public policy. To answer the research question, data are collected on financial contributions made by state legislators to ballot campaign committees in a series of salient ballot measures put on the ballot in the 2012 and 2014 election cycles. In addition, we collect data on legislators’ individual characteristics (time in office), legislatures’ characteristics (level of professionalism) and ballot propositions (subject matter of the proposition; type of propositions).

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 11465 words || 
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2. Allen, Kristen. and Cook, Ian. "Buying Legislators or Buying Judges? The Impact of Campaign Contributions on State Judicial and Legislative Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-04-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544920_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Anyone running for an elected office knows the importance of campaign contributions—a resource that can potentially be translated into votes (Mayhew 1974). A great deal of research on contributions in elections has focused on one of two topics: the effect of campaign spending on electoral outcomes, or the effect of campaign contributions on voting decisions. This is true at both the federal (Green and Krasno 1988) and state levels (Caldeira and Patterson 1982). However, virtually no research has comparatively examined the effects of campaign contributions electoral outcomes or on different types of elections. This research seeks to answer the question of whether there a difference between the ways in which campaign contributions affect judicial versus legislative races at the state level? We argue that the different types of relationships between judges and legislators and their constituents is key to understanding where money may be more important. The strong representational linkage between legislative candidate and constituents, along with other contextual factors of the races, requires legislative candidates to amass greater pools of resources during their campaigns. Using an original data set of races in 16 states, we find that this is in fact the case, with contributions significantly affecting legislative candidate‘s vote share; there is no significant impact of contributions on vote share in judicial elections.

2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 181 words || 
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3. Chou, Benjamin. "Legislative Vote Cleavages in Recent State Immigration Omnibus Legislation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-04-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634495_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the attempt by state legislatures to adopt legislation in the area of immigration policy over the past three years, focusing both on those cases where immigration omnibus reform legislation passed as well as where it did not. The paper will analyze 14 states, six (Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina, and Utah) which passed such legislation and eight (Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, Texas, and West Virginia) which failed to do so. Particular focus will be on the degree of support for this immigration reform legislation within the Republican and Democratic parties, as well as within different ethnic/racial, ideological, sex, and geographic sub-groups within each party. Initial results have shown that there may be a negative relationship between passage of strict immigration omnibus bills with the number of legislators who self-identify as Hispanic. Partisan and ideological differences also seem likely to be strong predictors of legislative passage. Given the current federal stalemate on immigration legislation, the results of this project will provide a good prediction of the future of individual states’ attempts to address America’s immigration dilemma.

2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 124 words || 
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4. Vela Baron, Mauricio. "Parochial versus programmatic legislators and duration of legislative initiatives: Evidence from Colombia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-04-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1225556_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on the analysis of legislative process, in particular on legislative delay. Given that time is a scarce resource, legislators are interested that their bills make their way through congress in short approval times. It is argued that legislators' emphasis on their parochial or their programmatic policy interests is a factor of influence on the duration of the decision-making process in a legislature. Parochial legislators are willing to support policy proposals from legislative coalition without requiring major concessions. Therefore, this paper examines whether in fact parochial legislators reap higher benefits by having easier legislative processes for their bills. This is tested using legislative data from Colombia and by using the level of vote concentration in order to identify parochial from programmatic legislators.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 48 pages || Words: 13413 words || 
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5. Mooney, Christopher. "Thank You, Paul Jacob: State Legislative Term Limits as a Boon to Legislative Scholarship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-04-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211029_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: After an unusually swift reform movement in the 1990s, 15 states are now adjusting to the most significant institutional change in state government in a generation—legislative term limits. Beyond presenting political scientists with the basic task of identifying and cataloging its wide variety of substantive impacts, this reform provides scholars with an unprecedented opportunity to test and extend legislative theory. Most legislative theory is supported by behavioral assumptions that term limits appear to threaten. In particular, the assumption that legislators are driven by a re-election motivation is the foundation of both most positive and more informal explanations of the legislative process. This assumption must be modified—if not rejected completely—in the presence of term limits, giving a unique opportunity to test these theories. I describe some of the benefits of using term limits to test and extend legislative theory by reviewing the existing literature on the subject. In the process, I also highlight term limits’ exceptional methodological advantages for theory testing (exogeneity, strong research designs, and significant variation on the causal variable) and explicate the potential causal mechanisms at work with the reform.

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