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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 24 words || 
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1. Holman, Mirya., Bromley-Trujillo, Rebecca. and Sandoval, Andres. "Hot Districts, Cool Legislation: Evaluating the Effects of Climate Vulnerability, Legislative Incentives, and Institutional Features on Climate Change Legislation Sponsorship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346812_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We evaluate how district and legislator characteristics, including temperature anomalies and donor information, shape who sponsors legislation relating to climate change in U.S. states.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Pages: 6 pages || Words: 1837 words || 
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2. Hodge-Kamin, Jessica. "Exploring the Gender Quandary of Bias Crimes: A Content Analysis of Legislative Histories and Media Reports of the Development and Enforcement of Bias Crime Legislation in New Jersey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 14, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201232_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although the pervasiveness of violence against women is not a new phenomenon, what is considered an appropriate response to gender-motivated violence remains divisive in both academic literature and in federal and state policies. A relatively new approach is the inclusion of gender within state bias crime legislation. However, despite the controversy surrounding the inclusion of gender in bias crime legislation, little empirical research has been conducted on the topic. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the gender quandary within bias crime legislation by examining one state’s efforts to include gender as a category within its bias crime legislation. Through content analyses of legislative records and media reports, this research examines the process in which the gender category was included within New Jersey’s bias crime legislation, and subsequently, how the category has been framed within the media since the passage of the law. Findings indicate that both the legal climate and the political climate were conducive to the inclusion of gender within New Jersey’s bias crime legislation; however, since the passage of the law, the gender category has not received the same media attention as other forms of bias-motivated crimes. As such, this research informs hate crime policy debates on the state and federal levels, yet more specifically, informs policy-makers and other claims-makers interested in combating gender-motivated violence.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 10424 words || 
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3. Martin, Shane. "Explaining Legislative Committees: Coalition Government and Legislators Preferences in Comparative Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Aug 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59642_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Committees remain one of the most significant forms of internal legislative organization. Despite this, no theory exists to explain variation in committee structures across legislatures. I argue that strong committee systems emerge as an institutional response to the needs and preferences of parties in multiparty government - particularly the need to ensure coalition policy is being implemented by individual ministers, as well as the needs and preferences of individual legislators - as determined by electoral institutions. My propositions are tested with new data from 31 parliamentary democracies and compared with traditional accounts of legislative design. I find a significant empirical relationship between strong legislative committee and multiparty government. Surprisingly, legislator’s individual preferences are a less significant determinant of committee structure. My core finding, that strong committees exist as a method of intra-coalition monitoring rather than a source of oppositional influence, suggest the need for significant adjustments to existing theories of legislative organization and coalition government.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 45 pages || Words: 13172 words || 
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4. Preuhs, Robert. and Gonzalez Juenke, Eric. "A Unified Theory of Minority-Majority Districts, Racial and Ethnic Incorporation, and Legislative Influence: Latino Legislators in the American States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152177_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: This paper examines the electoral, ideological and institutional implications for Latino Minority-Majority Districts. Using data from state legislative districts in 20 states, the study finds that 1) Latinos are more likely to be elected from MMDs than non-MMDs, 2) that Latino Democratic legislators are more liberal than other legislators, including other Democrats, 3) MMDs increase the tenure of Latino legislators, 4) Latino MMDs create compact districts that are proximate to the median in each legislative chamber, and 5) tenure and proximity to the median chamber are positively associated with Latinos ability to hold legislative leadership positions.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7830 words || 
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5. Carrera, Leandro. and Crisp, Brian. "Presidents' Power to Legislate: Popular Approval, Legislative Pivot Points, and the Use of Presidential Decree Authority" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83222_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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