Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 22 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next
2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 212 words || 
Info
1. Jacobson, Jennifer. "Is Lemon Really Dead? The Effect of the Weakening of the Lemon Test on Lower Court Decision-Making" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634458_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent years, the decisions made by the Supreme Court in the area of Establishment Clause jurisprudence has led many scholars to assert that the landmark decision of Lemon v. Kurtzman and the resulting Lemon Test has been largely ignored and eroded. While this assertion has been heavily studied at the Supreme Court level, little research has been conducted that examines how the weakening of the Lemon precedent affects the decisions made by lower federal courts. This study is a first step at attempting to fill this void in the literature. Utilizing team theory, this paper will examine all cases decided by the Courts of Appeals between 1972 and 2005 and will answer the crucial question of whether or not the weakening of Lemon at the Supreme Court level has caused the lower courts to also stress the three prongs of the Lemon Test less. Preliminary results show that team theory is an adequate description of the relationship between the Supreme Court and the Courts of Appeals when it comes to decisions made in this area of law as evidenced by the fact that lower courts have followed the lead of the Supreme Court by also abandoning part of the Lemon Test in the cases they have decided.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7418 words || 
Info
2. McCumbers, Rebecca. "Is McCreary a Lemon?: Neutrality and the Lemon Test in McCreary v. ACLU" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140772_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will examine the Supreme Court's 2005 rulings on Ten Commandments displays in the McCreary and Van Orden cases to see if the Court does indeed have a consistent standard for judging Establishment Clause cases.

2016 - Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting Words: 232 words || 
Info
3. Boneza, Maxime. and Niemeyer, Emily. "Variations in phenolic composition and antioxidant properties among lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) cultivars" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Texas Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Texas Tech University, Junction, TX, Mar 04, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1114017_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Phenolic acids are known for their ability to fight oxidation as well as their antibacterial properties. Although lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) is known for its high phenolic content, its phenolic acid composition and antioxidant properties are less well studied, particularly within fresh plants. Therefore, in this research, we quantify the levels of total and individual phenolic acids in fresh lemon balm and determine how these compounds and the overall antioxidant capacity vary as a function of cultivar and commercial seed source. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze eight phenolic acids commonly found in Lamiaceae herbs. Total phenolic content was investigated with the Folin-Ciocalteu assay and antioxidant capacity was determined using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Total phenolic content among the cultivars ranged from 4.2 gallic acid equivalents (GAE) in mg/g dry weight (DW) for ‘Lemonella’ to 38.0 GAE (mg/g DW) for common lemon balm. Rosmarinic acid was the individual phenolic acid in highest concentration among the cultivars studied and varied from 0.74 mg/DW for ‘Lemonella’ to 52.14 mg/DW for common lemon balm. Seed company was found to have a significant effect on the radical scavenging capability of lemon balm extracts (p < 0.05) while cultivar did not (p = 0.985). This presentation will examine the overall impact of seed company and cultivar on total and individual phenolic concentrations, and will discuss how these compounds contribute to measured antioxidant capacities in lemon balm.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Carrigan, Christopher. and Mills, Russell. "Making Lemonade from Lemons: Accounting for Agency Capacity in Rulemaking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1128786_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Determining the extent to which regulatory agencies promulgate rules in a timely manner is on a short list of the most fundamental questions facing contemporary scholars of bureaucratic politics. Studies assessing perceived regulatory delay have focused attention on describing the influences on an agency’s rulemaking agenda (West and Raso 2012), agency responsiveness to statutory and judicial deadlines (Yackee and Yackee 2010; Lavertu and Yackee 2012), and the ability of agencies to strategically prioritize certain rules depending upon the political environment (Acs 2015). Despite the wide range of studies examining regulatory timeliness, few have considered in a comprehensive manner the effects of differences in the capacities of agencies to promulgate rules. We examine how variation in staffing levels and available resources in agency rulemaking and policy offices affects the abilities of these agencies to meet statutory rulemaking deadlines. Using an original data set of full-time equivalent employees in each agency’s rulemaking and policy offices along with office-specific appropriations amounts, we model the impacts of rulemaking resources on regulatory timing. The results reveal that some agencies are able to overcome capacity limitations more effectively than others to mitigate the possibility for protracted rulemaking processes.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 22 pages || Words: 5528 words || 
Info
5. Kirk, Amy. "Lemons or Lemonade?: Commitment As A Predictor for How Couples Cope with Adversity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242266_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since the early 1990’s, marriage scholars and activists have increasingly cited commitment as the key to long-term marital quality and stability (Love, 2007; Stanley, Markman and Whitton, 2002). “Commitment” has become a buzz word in the marriage-preserving community, and is considered by many to be the cornerstone for the public preservation of marriage (Doherty, 2001; Stanley, Rhoades, & Markman, 2006). In this paper, I briefly revisit my dissertation findings that are relevant to commitment and husbands’ job loss experiences. In doing so, I share my data about how couples’ subjective notions of commitment impacted the presence of hostility for some couples. Findings indicate that positive affect, as demonstrated in subjective notions of commitment, can influence marital quality despite external circumstances. While it is impossible to understand from this study the importance of commitment to coping with adversity, it appears as if relationships are what we make of them. Subjective notions of commitment and marital quality are reflexive, and can cause us to construct our external circumstances in different ways.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy