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Showing 1 through 5 of 35 records.
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2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 10613 words || 
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1. Youm, Kyu. "Globalization of U.S. Law on Press Freedom: “Actual Malice" as a Balancing Test for Libel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13713_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Increasingly important to journalists is the growing interaction between U.S. and foreign libel law as American news media are becoming more transnational now than ever. This is accelerated by Internet communication, which most likely will raise a wide array of conflict of laws and choice of law questions, as highlighted by the Australian High Court’s decision in Dow Jones & Co. v. Gutnick in 2002.
This Article first analyzes the international impact of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, New York Times v. Sullivan ca and its progeny. Next, the Article focuses on how the “actual malice” doctrine has been accepted or rejected in several countries over the years. The final section of this Article summarizes the author’s findings and offers his conclusions.

2011 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 10981 words || 
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2. Edmondson, Aimee. "A Pulitzer up North, a Libel Suit down South: Southern Editors' Civil Rights Writings, 1954-1968" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520103_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study focuses on libel suits filed against four Pulitzer Prize winners in the South. Just as the New York Times faced the wrath of police commissioner L.B. Sullivan in the most famous of libel cases, here are four southern editors who fought suits against public officials and public figures in the South in the 1950s and 1960s. In any study of reporters’ attempts to cover the civil rights movement and southern efforts to stop them, southern journalists should be included.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 140 words || 
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3. May, Steven. "“Placebo”: A Protestant Verse Libel Modeled on Skelton’s Phyllyp Sparowe" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524172_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: John Skelton’s droll, mildly satiric "Phyllyp Sparowe" is structured as a parody of the Catholic vesper service for the dead. Skelton’s very popular poem saw at least six editions between 1545 and the accession of Queen Elizabeth in 1558. Late in that year, an anonymous poet used Skelton’s parodic form to launch a scathing attack on the Catholic Marian regime. The unique text of this libel among the Loseley manuscripts at the Folger Shakespeare Library offers unique insight into the mood of persecuted English Protestants as it became clear that Mary was terminally ill and that her successor, Elizabeth, would replace her Catholic episcopacy with a Protestant state church. This parody of a parody offers a witty, gloating, insider’s view of the anxiety and distress felt by Mary’s bishops and chief officers of state as they anticipated imminent regime change.

2014 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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4. May, Steven. "Thomas Buckley’s Greatest Hit: The “Libel of Oxford”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, New York, NY, Hilton New York, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p676022_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Around 1568, Thomas Buckley, fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, composed a lengthy poem that attacked by name, or thinly disguised pseudonym, dozens of Oxford citizens and members of the University. His charges were almost exclusively weighted toward sexual misdemeanors, and the resulting libel was far to “hot” ever to appear in print. Instead, it circulated widely in manuscript for at least the next seventy years. It survives in whole or significant part in fourteen manuscripts. In 1572 it inspired a copy-cat “Libel of Cambridge,” and about 1592, a second “Libel of Oxford” with an entirely new and updated cast of victims. Stray stanzas crop up in poetic anthologies as late as the 1630s, while individual stanzas are adapted to and echoed in poetic attacks on persons unassociated with the original work. Buckley’s spirited if tasteless verse was one of the most influential and popular poems of the Elizabethan era.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 10210 words || 
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5. Watson, Roxanne., Roldan, Roberto. and Faza, Andres. "Toward Normalization of Libel Laws: The U.K. Defamation Act 2013" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986590_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: England has developed the unfortunate epithet of being the “libel tourism capital of the world,” while its former colony, the U.S. has amongst the most liberal libel laws worldwide. This article explores the development of libel law in the two territories and the recent 2013 Defamation Act passed in the U.K. to help eliminate the problem of libel tourism. It advocates normalization of libel laws as a solution to the problem of libel tourism.

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