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2009 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 99 words || 
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1. Leigey, Margaret. "A Woman's Life Before Serving Life: Examining the Negative Pre-Incarceration Life Events of Female Life-Sentenced Inmates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371730_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the increase in the number of females incarcerated, there is a paucity of research concerning female life-sentenced inmates in the United States. Using a nationally representative dataset containing the largest known sample of female life-sentenced inmates, the purpose of the present research is to examine the pre-incarceration traumatic experiences of female life-sentenced inmates. Results indicate that female life-sentenced inmates were more likely to experience traumatic events, in particular abuse, than either male life-sentenced inmates or other female inmates. Logistic regression analyses indicate that abuse is significantly associated with incarceration for a life sentence in both gender specific models.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 154 words || 
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2. Leigey, Margaret. "Life After Life? Examining the Expectation of Release Among Older Life Without Parole Inmates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201910_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using a triangulated research design, this presentation will examine the expectation of release among older male inmates serving a life without parole (LWOP) sentence. Using data extracted from the Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Facilities (1997), quantitative analyses will involve a series of logistic regression analyses that predict the likelihood of expectation of release older LWOP inmates. Their expectation of release will be compared to two reference groups: younger LWOP inmates and older non-LWOP inmates. Younger LWOP inmates refers to inmates who are 49 years of age or less, while older non-LWOP inmates are defined as inmates, who are at least 50 years of age, and serving prison sentences other than life and LWOP. The qualitative component of this research is derived from 25 in-depth interviews conducted with older male LWOP inmates. Inmate responses regarding their expectations of release will be coded and variance in their expectation of release will be examined.

2003 - American Sociological Association Words: 3 words || 
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3. O'Rand, Angela. "Life Course Capital and Life Course Risk: Stratification and the Life Course." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106123_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: (to be uploaded)

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13652 words || 
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4. Hale, Joanna. "Do Early-Life Deprivation and Social Inequalities over the Life Course Impact Late-Life Cognitive Decline?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707780_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project has two main research questions: (1) What is the association between late-life cognitive decline and sociodemographic and health characteristics?; and (2) Does the “natural experiment” of the Great Depression in the U.S. provide evidence that there is an association between prenatal or childhood exposure to food shortage and stress and late-life cognitive decline (cohort effects)? I test five hypotheses related to those questions. The empirical work uses ten waves of the U.S. Health and Retirement Survey, from 1992 to 2010, operationalizing cognitive decline as self- or proxy-reported diagnosis of memory disease. My results suggest that exposure to the Great Depression significantly increases the likelihood of being diagnosed with a memory disease (OR = 1.68, p<0.001). Furthermore, sex (OR=.74, p < .001), stroke one year prior to diagnosis (OR=1.3, p < .001), level of emotional depression two years prior (OR=1.2, p<.001), BMI two years prior (OR=.98, p<.01), and late-life wealth two years prior (OR=.93, p<.01) are associated with the likelihood of a memory disease diagnosis, net of other effects. Hispanic ethnicity has a significant impact in the models until cohort membership is included, while being Black is no longer significant once chronic illnesses are included. In contrast to the Cognitive Reserve hypothesis, neither educational attainment nor occupation are significant when controlling for other factors. I offer some potential explanations for these results.

2014 - Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference Words: 568 words || 
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5. Greene, Elizabeth. "From life skills to the facts of life: Examining governmentality in life skills-based sexuality education for pre-service teachers in Zambia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p718356_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many international health experts, social scientists, policymakers, and educators consider life skills-based sexuality education to be an effective solution for preventing unwanted pregnancies and sexually-transmitted infections like HIV/AIDS. The rationale is that youth need certain psychosocial skills (“life skills”) in order to use knowledge about disease and reproduction when contemplating and enacting sexual behavior (World Health Organization, 1993). Life skills-based sexuality education has been implemented in numerous countries around the world, including Zambia where approximately one out of six people is seropositive (Ministry of Health, 2010). The national curriculum emphasizes ten core skills including creative thinking, critical thinking, self awareness, decision making, problem solving, effective communication, coping with stress and emotions, empathy, and interpersonal skills (Ministry of Education, 1996). The skills are to be taught to learners using interactive pedagogies such as role play, games, and group discussion, and have been integrated throughout the academic curriculum.

At the same time, scholars such as Nikolas Rose (1990, 1998) and Barbara Cruikshank (1993) have utilized Michel Foucault’s theory of governmentality (1979/1991) to demonstrate how technologies, including but not limited to schooling, are employed in the production of particular mentalities and skills which are necessary for the development of self-governing citizens. Foucault’s view of power does not only focus on acts of domination by social and political elites but also how social institutions such as schools, hospitals, and penitentiaries, as well as science and knowledge, exercise power over and through individuals. These technologies of power transfer the responsibility for citizens’ health and wellbeing from inter/national governments’ actions to individuals’ choices and behaviors.

The purpose of this paper is to examine how life skills-based sexuality education produces Foucauldian self-governing mentalities and skills in Zambian learners and how this contributes to the development of subjectivities essential for the propagation and maintenance of inter/national neoliberal government structures. The analysis will be conducted by drawing upon ethnographic observations of pre-service education classrooms, interviews with lecturers and student teachers, and examinations of relevant policies, curricula, and texts. As the life skills-based sexuality curriculum does not address structural inter/national inequalities but leads to the inculcation of skills and attitudes necessary for their maintenance, it is likely that Zambian youth will continue to struggle in expressing their sexualities and experiencing health and wellbeing. This examination is significant for understanding the relation of schools and inter/national states and for revisioning possibilities for sexuality education in the country.

Cruikshank, B. (1993). Revolutions within: Self-government and self-esteem. Economy and Society, 22(3), 327-344.

Foucault, M. (1979/1991). Governmentality. In G. Burchell, C. Gordon, and P. Miller (Eds.), The Foucault effect: Studies in governmentality, p. 87-104 . Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Ministry of Education. (1996). Educating our future: National policy on education. Lusaka: Zambia Educational Publishing House.

Ministry of Health. (2010). Zambia country report -- Monitoring the Declaration of Commitment on HIV and AIDS and the Universal Access: Reporting period January 2008 - December 2009. Geneva: Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS.

Rose, N. S. (1990). Governing the soul: The shaping of the private self. London: Routledge.

Rose, N. S. (1998). Inventing our selves: Psychology, power, and personhood. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press.

World Health Organization Division of Mental Health. (1993). Life skills education for children and adolescents in schools: Introduction and guidelines to facilitate the development and implementation of life skills programmes. Geneva: Division of Mental Health, WHO.

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