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Showing 1 through 5 of 311 records.
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2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 60 words || 
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1. Choi, Kyungshick. and Bezich, Anthony. "Influence of juvenile lifestyles on substance abuse: An empirical test of lifestyle exposure theory." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126712_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Juvenile substance abuse is a central issue in criminology research and public policy. Many studies assume or affirm that lifestyle activities influence substance abuse. Few studies, however, have rigorously tested lifestyle exposure theory as an explanation for substance abuse by juveniles. This study empirically assesses lifestyle exposure theory using data from the Monitoring the Future survey of high school seniors.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6015 words || 
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2. Haenfler, Ross., Johnson, Brett. and Jones, Ellis. "Lifestyle Movements: Intersection Of Lifestyle And Social Movement In Voluntary Simplicity And Social Responsibility Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241032_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The conceptual wall between lifestyles and social movements has created a scholarly blind spot that conceals numerous theoretical insights that reside at the intersection of: private action and movement participation, personal change and social change, and personal identity and collective identity. Drawing upon our research on the Social Responsibility and Voluntary Simplicity Movements we outline a new conceptual category of collective action, lifestyle movements, and present four defining aspects of lifestyle movements: (1) lifestyle (especially consumption) as a tactic of political/social action, (2) the diffuse structure of lifestyle movements, (3) the central role of personal and collective identity, and (4) the links between lifestyle movements and social movements.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 139 words || 
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3. Childs, Kristina. and gibson, chris. "Low self-control, lifestyles, and violent victimization: Considering the mediating and moderating effects of gang involvement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32216_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The body of empirical research testing self-control theory has concluded that individuals low in self-control engage in problematic behaviors and experience many negative consequences due to their dispositions. However, few studies have assessed victimization as being one of these negative consequences. Schreck (1999) has recently extended self-control theory by integrating it with a lifestyle model to explain why low self-control individuals are at increased risk for victimization. We replicate and extend Schreck’s work by investigating gang involvement as a risky lifestyle in the self-control/victimization linkage. Using data from a sample of approximately 5,000 adolescents, we pose three research questions. First, can dimensions of self-control account for variation in victimization. Second, is this relationship mediated by gang involvement? Third, is this relationship moderated, or amplified, by gang involvement? Future research directions will be discussed.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 131 words || 
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4. Crews, Gordon. and West, Angela. "Metal Music, Mayhem and Murder: Explaining Youth Participation in Alternative Groups and Lifestyles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66751_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: This poster depicts an examination of youth involvement (violent and nonviolent) in alternative cultures and subcultures (e.g., Goth, Occult, “Black Circles”, Satanic), focusing on the role of music in influencing youth behaviors. Society and the media often scapegoat music as the “cause” of youth violence and deviant activity. Personal interviews and participant observations of these youth in the United States and in several other countries (Denmark, Germany, Turkey, Netherlands, and United Kingdom) seem to indicate, however, that participation in these alternative lifestyles and appreciation for the heavy, black, or death metal music, may serve to reinforce a youth’s bonds to his or her environment. Elements of strain theory and social bond theory are illustrated as a background for a proposed theory of youth involvement in these alternative groups/lifestyles

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 91 words || 
Info
5. Heinonen, Justin. and Monk, Khadija. "Reducing University Student Robberies Using a Lifestyle-Routine Activity Theory Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, Nov 11, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p269574_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Research has shown that lifestyle-routine activity theory predicts personal and violent victimization. For instance, Fisher, Cullen, Sloan, and Lu (1998) discovered that several indicators of this framework are predictive of college students’ risk of violent victimization, including robbery. This paper examines the behavioral patterns and lifestyles of both student robbery victims and non-student robbery victims to determine the factors related to robberies that have occurred on or around campus. Findings from victim surveys and general student surveys are used to recommend programs to enhance student safety on and around campus.

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