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2006 - American Studies Association Words: 485 words || 
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1. Royster, Francesca. "“Feeling Like a Woman, Looking Like a Man, Sounding Like a No-No:” Grace Jones’s Eccentric Sexuality”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p114451_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: “Feeling Like a Woman, Looking Like a Man, Sounding Like a No-No:” Grace Jones’s Eccentric Sexuality”

     The darling of Andy Warhol and Keith Haring, Grace Jones is often associated with white gay male subculture. Yet we can see the sign of Grace in the vocal stylings of Nona Hendrix and Nena Cherry in the late 1980’s; in the stagecraft of Tina Turner’s post-Ike renaissance; and in the sartorial and sexual outrageousness of RuPaul and perhaps even Lil’ Kim and Foxy Browne in the 1990s,  moving into the twenty-first century. And we can also see Grace Jones explicitly referenced in African American and Caribbean art that might be outside of the realm of “entertainment”: New York visual and performance artist Lyle Ashton Harris’s “Memoirs of Hadrian #19” and Postmodern cubist Caribbean poet Deborah Richards, in “The Halle Berry One-Two,” for example. In Grace Jones’ work and that of the other black artists influenced by her, we see the wedding of disco and punk; art and fashion; male and female, animal and human, and human and machine to create new notions of black sexuality.
      Grace Jones counters and surpasses traditional notions of gendered erotic performances- for black women in particular-  by occupying and performing the image of  the black female body as “Strange” or “eccentric.”  Here, I call on Carla Peterson’s definition of “eccentric,” “insisting on its double meaning: the first evokes a circle not concentric with another, an axis not centrally placed (according to the dominant system), whereas the second extends the notion of off-centeredness to suggest freedom of movement stemming from the lack of central control and hence new possibilities of difference conceived as empowering oddness.” (Peterson xii).  Jones’ use of drag puts her into the larger history of African Diaspora performers using gender in complex ways. Jones’ drag and other techniques of performing identity pose challenges of readability. She is, in many ways a trickster figure, sliding out of grasp of both her fans and critics. Like three other trickster performers of color who rose to prominence during the same period of the 1980’s and early 1990’s– visual artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, whose works and life constantly poke fun at fears of black sexual potency; performance artist Coco Fusco, whose 1992 collaborations with Guillermo Gómez-Pena, the “Two Undiscovered Amerindians” series, document the “irony of having to demonstrate one’s humanity “ through over the top staged performances of the “savage” on display; and rapper Flavor Flav, “sideman” for the group Public Enemy, whose manic comic persona fueled the critical fire of many of Public Enemy’s most potent political songs-- – Jones uses an outsized, “eccentric” public persona—one that often risks caricature – to lobby critique and to express anger and ultimately, agency. In this  talk, I will explore Jones’ eccentric sexuality in the cultural context of the 1980’s and 1990’s, and the implications of her performances on recent theoretical discourses of transgender identity, drag and desire. 

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9427 words || 
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2. Ganster, Tina. "Like What You See? A Qualitative Exploration of Peer Influence Exerted Through the Display of Likes on Facebook Pages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p637028_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper addresses the impact of like-displays that indicate how many friends (friend-display) and how many users overall (fan-display) have liked a brand page on Facebook. Based on literature on conformity and self-presentation, we conducted think aloud-interviews to determine the role of like-displays for evaluation processes and the intention to like the page. Results show that like-displays contain a variety of information and lead to different processes of conformity, e.g. by serving as an indicator of popularity or quality. Friend-displays and fan-displays fulfill different purposes regarding conformity processes: For example, friend-displays can help to derive information about the topic from prior experience with the people. Further, the impact of like-displays differs depending on whether the reaction is public or private. The liking of a page (as a public reaction) is used as a means of strategic self-presentation; hence self-presentational goals (e.g. authenticity) have to be taken into account as well.

2013 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 50 words || 
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3. Osborne, Denise. "Do you Like Rap Music? Yes, I Like Happy Music. How Brazilian Portuguese Speakers Perceive English [h] and [ɹ]" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Sheraton Dallas, Dallas, Texas, Mar 16, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p624272_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this ongoing research, I investigate the perceived phonetic distance of English [h] and [ɹ] by English learners, as well as the categorization of the target phonemes in Portuguese by L2 learners and monolingual Portuguese speakers through three experiments: an AXB Discrimination Test, an Identification Test, and an Assimilation Test.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Chestnut, Eleanor. and Markman, Ellen. "A tent is like a house vs. a house is like a tent: The asymmetry of comparisons and its effect on children's construal of concepts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959019_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Logically symmetrical predicates are frequently interpreted asymmetrically (e.g., Tversky, 1977). Adults prefer to say, e.g., “My brother met Elvis,” over, “Elvis met my brother.” This is because directional syntax contains figure and ground thematic roles, requiring more prominent items to be placed in the ground (second) position (Talmy, 1978). Little is known about the development of this asymmetric interpretation, but if children share this sensitivity, they could draw rich inferences from minimal linguistic input. To address this, in Studies 1 and 2 we asked whether children prefer to relate figures to grounds when expressing spatial relations and similarity, where the ground should be the larger or more typical item, respectively. Children ages four to six (N = 85) heard twelve sentences containing novel words (e.g., “The kubi is near the fappo”; “A modi is like a feppet") and were asked to map those words onto images in a picture (e.g., a bicycle and a building; a zebra and a horse). Results showed that children prefer to relate figures to grounds, thus making inferences about items’ size and typicality based on their positions in directional statements (Figure 1). In Study 3, we used the same paradigm to ask whether children infer grounds to have greater skill and status in more specific comparisons (e.g., “The blicket dances like the toma”). We also investigated whether including the modal can (e.g., “The blicket can dance like the toma”) or the comparative as well as (e.g., “The blicket dances as well as the toma”) would strengthen this inference. Now, children viewed eight pictures that contained an adult and a child, as adults are more skilled and of higher status than children. Children ages six to eight, but not younger (N = 96), tended to identify the adult as the ground in comparisons containing can and as well as, suggesting that these linguistic cues accentuate asymmetric interpretations of symmetrical comparisons (Figure 2). Finally, in Study 4, we provide evidence for the prevalence and ecological validity of directional comparisons involving gender. Using Google, Twitter, and New York Times search engines, we searched for phrases such as “men are as * as women” and “women are as * as men”, in which the asterisk could be replaced by any word. The results revealed that women are compared to men considerably more often than the reverse: while “men are as * as women” yielded 35,200,000 results in Google, for example, “women are as * as men” yielded 117,000,000. In everyday language, then, directional comparisons between men and women are common, and there is a strong bias for women to serve as the figure and men as the ground. Thus, children may be frequently exposed to statements that, while ostensibly expressing gender equality, actually afford males with higher status. This work has important implications for attempts to counter stereotypes. Telling children that girls can do science as well as boys, for example, may not only perpetuate gender differences, but may even implant the idea that boys are the better scientists.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 125 words || 
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5. Catalinac, Amy. and Smith, Daniel. "Like Father, Like Son: Continuity of Representational Style in Dynasties" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1123478_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political dynasties are common in democracies, but their consequences for representation are uncertain. In this study, we argue that members of dynasties are attractive to voters in part because they signal a familiar representational style. We make use of the fact that candidates for Japan’s House of Representatives cultivate personal bailiwicks to mobilize voters during elections, and often bequeath their local support organizations to designated successors when they retire. These successors are sometimes kin, but sometimes non-kin. We estimate the representational style of candidates from 1986-2009 with a quantitative text analysis of pre-electoral candidate manifestos, and find that kin successors adopt representational styles that are statistically indistinguishable from their predecessors, in contrast to non-kin successors. This continuity in representational style holds across different electoral systems.

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