Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,313 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 463 - Next  Jump:
2004 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9116 words || 
Info
1. Wright, Gerald. "Do Term Limits Limit Representation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Portland, Oregon, Mar 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-02-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p87969_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract: This paper has two purposes. The first is to assess how the recent findings of Carey et al. (2003) of a “Burkean shift” among term limited state legislators is reflected in patterns of policy representation in the states. The second, and related purpose, is to assess the popular assumption that legislators’ policy behavior is kept in line with constituency preferences by fears of voter retaliation in upcoming elections. This “sanctions” model of elections is contrasted in a “selection” model of elections in which policy-motivated candidates run on distinguishable ideological platforms and, once selected, pursue the policy goals they offered to voters. Reelection in this model has little role in constraining candidate behavior. I argue that the implementation of term limits gives us a much cleaner design for testing this “last period” problem than do extant studies which focus on the voluntary retirement of members of Congress. Using a new data set of roll calls and constituency preferences for the full set of 99 state legislative chambers plus both houses of the Congress does not reveal a “Burkean shift” among term limited legislators. The pattern of findings indicate that term limits do not undermine the alignment of roll call voting and constituency preferences and there are no signs of drop offs in voting participation by term limited legislators.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 77 words || 
Info
2. Rengger, Nicholas. "The Limits of Politics or the Politics of Limits: Jean Bethke Eshltain's Ambiguous Augustinianism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-02-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179644_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper would focus on the manner in which Elshtain's recent work seems to offer a rather different reading of politics from that disclosed in her earlier writing. I locate this in the context of the relationship - powerful but, I suggest, ambiguous - between her general ideas about politics and her interpretation of Augustine. I then offer some thoughts as to what is at stake in the ambiguity, for Elshtain herself, and for politics in general.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 16 pages || Words: 3467 words || 
Info
3. Mitchell, Joshua. and Toner, Brendan. "Does One Limit Lead to Another? The Diffusion of State Term Limits Across Time and Space" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-02-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p268727_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Why have some states adopted legislative term limits and not others? Are states more likely to adopt legislative term limits when gubernatorial ones are already in place? Does term limit adoption have a spatial component?
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7133 words || 
Info
4. Caputo, Jennifer. and Simon, Robin. "Do Functionally Limited Adults Derive the Same Emotional Benefit from Marriage as their Non-limited Peers?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-02-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307681_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While research demonstrates a relationship between marriage and increased emotional well-being in the general population, we know relatively little about the benefit of marriage for functionally limited adults. In this paper, we examine whether the emotional benefits of marriage are as great for functionally limited adults compared to their non-limited peers. Existing research is equivocal and suggests that functionally limited adults derive more, less, and the same benefit from marriage as the non-limited. However, these studies tend to be based on small, non-representative samples of individuals with specific health problems. Our paper assesses differences in the association between marriage and emotional well-being for adults with and without functional limitations using the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS). Multivariate analyses indicate that functionally limited adults derive more benefit from marriage than their non-limited peers with respect to life satisfaction, but there is no difference with respect to other measures of psychological well-being. For the most part, functionally limited and non-limited adults receive similar emotional benefits from marriage. Our findings suggest the importance of considering functional limitation status when assessing the relationship between marriage and emotional well-being.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 71 pages || Words: 21832 words || 
Info
5. Ahram, Ariel. "Limited Wars and Limited States: The Devolution of Violence in Indonesia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-02-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211683_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper accounts for the origins and persistence of different models of coercive military organizations among developing states. Using a case study of Indonesia, it argues that the experience of decolonization wars embedded a model of decentralized control over local militias, giving the state mediated and uncertain power over the application of violence in its territory. This model became path dependent as the state was able to stabilize its relationship with local violence wielders by increasing the coercive and fiscal power located at the center and isolating local actors from potentially competing sources of central patronage, allowing the state to become militia’s sole sponsor. This system, however, was only sustainable as long as the international environment remained benign, since the militias were still difficult to control and coordinate centrally. Indonesia’s democratic opening broke the isolation of militias from
alternative sources of patronage, leading to a break down in internal order, but as long the international system permits them, such weak states can remain brokers for local violence without outright collapse.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 463 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy