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2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 166 words || 
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1. Touchton, Michael. "The Limits of Limited Government: Effective Checks and Balances, Governance, and Investment in Comparative Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1164098_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research surrounding political institutions and credible commitment to property rights and contract enforcement is a hallmark of recent efforts to tie democracy to economic development. Many argue that effective constraints on elected officials act as democratic commitment mechanisms rendering government policies credible and thus, attract investment. However, scholarship on the developing world suggests that too many constraints may lead to deadlock, crisis, and even regime change, which results in capital flowing away from the country. I draw on data on political constraints and investment for 185 countries between 1996 and 2015 and show that a country’s economic position conditions the influence of political constraints on investment: Constrained governments attract investment in wealthy countries, but repel it in poorer ones. This suggests that constrained government makes credible wealthy states’ previous commitments to property rights, but that the same constraints may prevent poorer states from making such a commitment in the first place- much less making the commitment credible. Ultimately, my research adds nuance to our understanding of

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 71 pages || Words: 21832 words || 
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2. Ahram, Ariel. "Limited Wars and Limited States: The Devolution of Violence in Indonesia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211683_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper accounts for the origins and persistence of different models of coercive military organizations among developing states. Using a case study of Indonesia, it argues that the experience of decolonization wars embedded a model of decentralized control over local militias, giving the state mediated and uncertain power over the application of violence in its territory. This model became path dependent as the state was able to stabilize its relationship with local violence wielders by increasing the coercive and fiscal power located at the center and isolating local actors from potentially competing sources of central patronage, allowing the state to become militia’s sole sponsor. This system, however, was only sustainable as long as the international environment remained benign, since the militias were still difficult to control and coordinate centrally. Indonesia’s democratic opening broke the isolation of militias from
alternative sources of patronage, leading to a break down in internal order, but as long the international system permits them, such weak states can remain brokers for local violence without outright collapse.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 41 pages || Words: 19394 words || 
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3. Maoz, Zeev. "The Unlimited Use of the Limited Use of Force: Israeli Strategy of Limited Warfare, 1949-2003" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73689_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Israeli strategy of use of force in limited conflict is examined. The paper explores the strategic foundations of Israeli behavior, using quantitative and qualitative data analytic approaches. The study argues that Israel has early on adopted a policy of excessive use of force in retaliation to (and sometime in anticipation of) hostile actions by the Arabs. This strategy is believed to have been extremely successful. In practice, its only key effect was to induce escalation. The implications of this strategy for Israel's national security and for regional stability are discussed.

2004 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 9116 words || 
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4. Wright, Gerald. "Do Term Limits Limit Representation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Portland, Oregon, Mar 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p87969_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract: This paper has two purposes. The first is to assess how the recent findings of Carey et al. (2003) of a “Burkean shift” among term limited state legislators is reflected in patterns of policy representation in the states. The second, and related purpose, is to assess the popular assumption that legislators’ policy behavior is kept in line with constituency preferences by fears of voter retaliation in upcoming elections. This “sanctions” model of elections is contrasted in a “selection” model of elections in which policy-motivated candidates run on distinguishable ideological platforms and, once selected, pursue the policy goals they offered to voters. Reelection in this model has little role in constraining candidate behavior. I argue that the implementation of term limits gives us a much cleaner design for testing this “last period” problem than do extant studies which focus on the voluntary retirement of members of Congress. Using a new data set of roll calls and constituency preferences for the full set of 99 state legislative chambers plus both houses of the Congress does not reveal a “Burkean shift” among term limited legislators. The pattern of findings indicate that term limits do not undermine the alignment of roll call voting and constituency preferences and there are no signs of drop offs in voting participation by term limited legislators.

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 37 pages || Words: 8874 words || 
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5. Caress, Stanley. "The Popularity of Legislative Term Limits: Public Opinion in a Non-Term-Limited State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280649_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Twenty-one states imposed term limits on their state legislature even though in six of those states either court decisions or legislative action rescinded them. Most voters favored term limit for reasons that can be grouped into the four motivational categories: Ideological; Partisan; Reformist; Skepticism.
Georgia has no limits on the number of times a state legislator can run for reelection. This study investigates the extent of popular support for changing two current features of Georgia state government: the length of the state legislature’s session and the number of times an incumbent can seek reelection. It also has a 40 day a year limit on its legislative session.
The survey initially found that public attention to state government is markedly low. Only 5.1% of the respondents said they closely follow the actions of the state legislature, while 25.4% followed it “somewhat.” Additionally, 33.2% reported that they followed it “only a little” and 34.4% said “not at all” with 2% decline/missing. The large percentage of respondents who said they had little or no information on the state legislature (67.7%) apparently impacted the answers to the following question on legislature performance. When asked to rate the performance of the state legislature a relatively large percentage (26.2%) declined to answer. Of those who did answer a low 1.6% said it did a “very good” job, and 19.5% said a “pretty good” job, with the largest proportion (39.8%) rating the performance as ”just OK.” Only 12.9% felt its performance was ”poor.”
The key question on the length of the legislative session found that 23.8% answered that 40 days were long enough, while 27.7% said an extra week was OK, and 19.1% thought an extra month was acceptable, but only 15.6% would accept a session lasting an entire year. Again, a large percentage (15.6%) gave a declined/missing response.
The term limit question produced the following replies: 26.6% favored no limits; 36.3% said 4 terms (8 years) was most desirable, while 15.6% favored 6 terms (12 years) and 5.8% supported the more lenient 10 terms (20 years), with 16% declined/missing. The ideology of the sample had the following breakdown: 27.7% described themselves as “conservative;” 26.6% said they were “moderately conservative;” 22.3% described themselves as “moderately liberal, while 14.8% said they were “liberal,” with 9% declined/missing.

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