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2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 161 words || 
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1. Kollu, Sravanthi. "A Literature for Everybody?: Language, Poetry, and Song in Telugu Marxist Literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p954076_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: My paper focuses on the precursors to the Telugu Marxist writers' engagement with the praja (or the 'people'). This engagement led to discussions and debates in Telugu Marxist literature on form, among which were discussions on the form of poetry and song. In this paper, I look at the debates on the modernization of Telugu that took place in the late 1800s and the early 1900s in order to delineate the concepts of literature and language that key figures such as Gidugu Ramamurti, Jayanti Ramayya and Gurajada Apparao were working with.

Figures such as Gidugu, who propagated colloquial Telugu (vyavahaarikam), advocated for a people's literature (praja sahityam). I claim that these debates and the concept of the praja sahityam can be seen as an early iteration of the split between the aesthetic and the political, after which it becomes difficult to claim literature only as an aesthetic exercise, with no relation to the political (political as a category which emphasizes democracy).

2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 2273 words || 
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2. Pet, Sue. "Who am I—as reader of and teacher of literature?: Exploring preservice English teachers’ “literary identities” and their conceptualizations of teaching literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p662851_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2007 - Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 240 words || 
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3. Harrison, Rashida. "Literature Performs the Blues: An Exploration of Black Women’s Protest Literature as a Blues Narrative for Urban Black Woman" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Atlanta Hilton, Charlotte, NC, Oct 02, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p207110_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: In this paper, I will explore Classic Blues Women’s relationship to traditional black protest literature- specifically, literature written by black women, about black women’s lives. This paper is concerned with those literary traditions that characterize the urban environment as providing an escape from the disenfranchised south, while fostering individualistic and alienating communities. Ann Petry’s The Street (1946) is one such work that serves as a sight of interrogation for black women’s literary performance of the blues. The Street’s blues theme echoes the sentiments that the city acts as a foreground for the eventual destruction, alienation, and un-communal community of black men and women. Angela Davis highlights some of the major themes occurring in classic women’s blues, including, economic desolation, the pathological relationships between black men and women, the distrust amongst black women, the everyday push for survival, as well as community empowerment in her Blues Legacies and Black Feminism (1998). She discusses the performance of classic blues as protest in that it has the potential to foster socio-political change. The Street can act as the backdrop for how Davis and other writers articulate the intentions and muse for black women blues artist. The life of the protagonist Lutie, illustrates how the environment molds and shapes the sentiments, attitudes, and overall spirit of blues women. Both the performance and written blues narratives are critical to black women’s articulation of their lived experiences in urban environments

2011 - AECT International Convention Words: 74 words || 
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4. Frey, Christopher., Ritzhaupt, Albert., Poling, Nathaniel. and Johnson, Margeaux. "Literature synthesis and meta-analysis of educational games and simulations literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, FL, Nov 08, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p512441_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation presents the results of a comprehensive literature synthesis and meta-analysis of educational games and simulations literature published between 2000 to 2010. One hundred seventy-eight articles met the inclusion and exclusion criteria to be included in this study. Preliminary results suggest that research on educational games and simulations is lacking critical information about the interventions under investigation. That is, more information about the games and simulations used in the studies should be provided.

2012 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 95 words || 
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5. Poulson-Bryant, Scott. "Love For Sale: The "Kept Man" in African American Literature Love For Sale: The "Kept Man" in African American Literature" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Oakland Marriott City Center, Oakland, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p573211_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The trope of the “kept man”—representations of male bodies being purchased, controlled, or monitored by others, usually as sexual objects—re-occurs throughout African American literature: James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, Paul Laurence Dunbar’s Sport of the Gods, and, most notably, Charles Johnson’s Oxherding Tale. I aim to look at the ways this theme of “keptness” redresses the slave narrative and theorizes on the racialized subjectivities of male characters who choose to or are forced to deviate from culturally entrenched notions of sexuality, often “queering” what we think of as “traditional” male sexual roles.

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