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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5552 words || 
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1. Kidder, Erin. "Constructed Lives: How Human Culture Shapes the Lives of Companion Animals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-07-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1380622_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores the experiences of companion animals (dogs and cats) within households, based on the socially constructed realities of their human companions. By examining the way humans shape interaction with their companion (pets) as well as their expectation for responses from their pets, we gain a better understanding of the human-animal relationship. Beyond that interaction, however, exists a host of other human realities through which pets inherit their experiences. In other words, human cultural experiences are shaped by age, education, gender, income, race-ethnicity, and the transmission of culture through socialization from one generation to the next. All of these factors are explored in an effort to determine the influence of human cultural experiences on the interaction between humans and their companion animals. This study further examines the impact human culture has on the wellbeing of pets from one generation to the next – some factors being more relevant than others. A review of literature will examine previous research from the perspectives of social construction, human-animal interaction, and cultural influence of humans on pets. Additionally, qualitative data and limited quantitative data from a previous study, consisting of interviews and surveys, will help to corroborate the assertion that humans do indeed have a substantial cultural impact on their companion animals.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7366 words || 
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2. Lin, Jielu. "Living Apart Together, Living Together Apart: Interpersonal Ties and Diabetes Clustering in Siblings and Couples" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-07-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1376741_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes has traditionally been considered as sufficient evidence for a genetic cause of the disease. Yet interpersonal contact and interaction between family members can create social environmental and behavioral similarities, thereby giving rise to the same pattern of familial clustering, without a common genetic predisposition. Potential pathways through which interpersonal ties are linked to not only diabetes incidence, but also familial clustering of diabetes include: (1) social control of health-related practices through kinship ties in the family system (e.g., interpersonal encouragement of preventive screening); (2) social influence/contagion of lifestyle (e.g., similar diet preference in mother-child pairs and in siblings); (3) proxy for social determinants of disease that are not captured by individual social standing and family characteristics. Since interpersonal ties in families are social in nature and yet endogenous to genetics, properly identifying the influence of these ties is critical to understanding the balance between genetic and environmental sources of diabetes. In samples of sibling pairs (n = 4, 459) and couples (n = 5, 226) from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, this paper examines whether concordance/discordance in diabetes diagnosis between biological and non-biological kin pairs can be attributed to interpersonal contact and closeness in these pairs. The analysis tests whether commonality in diabetes between sibling pairs and that between couples are moderated by the degree of the pair’s connectedness. Results show that diabetes concordance/discordance varies by interpersonal contact, not biological relatedness. The same degree of concordance in diabetes diagnosis is observed in both sibling pairs and couples with consistent reciprocal contact. Pairs without such contact are discordant, regardless whether they are biologically related or not. Future research should continue to examine the sociogenic origins of disease and determine the relative magnitude of genetic and social environmental influences on diseases with varied genetic etiologies.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7845 words || 
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3. Doan, Alesha. "Saving Lives or Killing Lives? Framing the Debate about Stem Cell Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-07-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211367_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Morality politics are often simplified and framed in elementary and non-technical language by active participants. But what happens when the morality issue does not lend itself to simplified frames for public and political debate? Stem cell research poses this problem for elites who oppose this type of research on moralistic grounds and liken it to the abortion debate where an “innocent” life is being “killed.” Yet, stem cell research is complicated and the potential benefits are far reaching, making it a more difficult issue to frame in “black and white” terms. What arguments do supporters and opponents use to frame the embryonic stem cell research debate? Does the public view stem cell research as a morality issue? What is the public’s support for stem cell research, and what factors shape an individual’s support for or opposition to stem cell research? Namely, do religious and political factors play similar roles in shaping opinions about stem cell research as they do in other morality issues? This research uses a unique public opinion survey of Georgian voters conducted in September 2006 to investigate public opinion in the stem cell research controversy.

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