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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8187 words || 
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1. Choi, HwaJung., Elo, Irma. and Heisler, Michele. "Are Individuals Living in More Equal Counties Healthier than Individuals Living in More Unequal Counties?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006585_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using a propensity score matching technique, we examined the contextual effect of income inequality on health. After removing those who newly/recently moved into the area (<5 years), we further assessed which SES group showed an association between income inequality and health.
Bivariate analysis results from the unmatched sample show that adults living in high income-inequality counties have poorer health in all health measures (SRH, ADL, IADL, blood pressure, CESD, stroke, diabetes, psychiatric problem) except for heart problem. After propensity score matching, only the adverse association with self-rated health status (SRH) remained statistically significant at the 5% level. Psychiatric problems were also significantly more prevalent for adults living in high income-inequality counties when we compare adults who lived in the area at least 15 years. The significant association with poorer SRHS is likely to be observed between 40th and 80th wealth percentiles, between 40th and 90th income percentiles, and among individuals without college education.
The question of whether income inequality has a causal effect on health has been argued for several decades. Our findings suggest adverse effect of income inequality may exist in terms of self-rated general health status and psychiatric problem for middle- and high- economic groups (except for very high).

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 32 words || 
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2. Zhao, Xinzhi. "To Live or Not to Live: a Comparison between Nietzsche’s Teaching of Will to Power and Hobbes’s Concept of Desire of Power" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1389360_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This comparison explains Nietzsche’s criticism of the modern state, explores the corresponding relationship between conceptions of politics and of human life, and questions the possibility of reconciling Nietzsche's philosophy with liberal democracy.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5552 words || 
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3. Kidder, Erin. "Constructed Lives: How Human Culture Shapes the Lives of Companion Animals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1380622_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores the experiences of companion animals (dogs and cats) within households, based on the socially constructed realities of their human companions. By examining the way humans shape interaction with their companion (pets) as well as their expectation for responses from their pets, we gain a better understanding of the human-animal relationship. Beyond that interaction, however, exists a host of other human realities through which pets inherit their experiences. In other words, human cultural experiences are shaped by age, education, gender, income, race-ethnicity, and the transmission of culture through socialization from one generation to the next. All of these factors are explored in an effort to determine the influence of human cultural experiences on the interaction between humans and their companion animals. This study further examines the impact human culture has on the wellbeing of pets from one generation to the next – some factors being more relevant than others. A review of literature will examine previous research from the perspectives of social construction, human-animal interaction, and cultural influence of humans on pets. Additionally, qualitative data and limited quantitative data from a previous study, consisting of interviews and surveys, will help to corroborate the assertion that humans do indeed have a substantial cultural impact on their companion animals.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 35 pages || Words: 12256 words || 
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4. Pittman, LaShawnDa., Beaman, Jean. and Watkins-Hayes, Celeste. "“Dying From” to “Living With:” Framing Institutions and the Coping Processes of Black Women Living with HIV/AIDS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242871_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We use ethnographic data to explore how institutions shape the ways in which HIV positive black women begin to come to terms with their illness and create strategies to effectively manage their health status. As the quality and accessibility of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) improve, so too do the life chances of HIV positive individuals. Examining black women’s HIV coping trajectories sheds light on how institutional and individual factors shape how they grapple with HIV disease and other negative life events closely tied to their marginal social locations. We argue that ‘framing institutions’ shape the form and tenor of coping processes by offering initial information about one’s status, a conceptual framework with which to understand what it means to have HIV, language to talk about one’s condition, and resources to initially begin to restructure one’s life in a wake of a diagnosis. We contend that framing institutions play a critical role in how women accept their changed health status, deploy information and resources to aid in the management of disease symptoms and problems, and construct a framework and language through which to understand and talk about their HIV experience. Ultimately, we highlight how social institutions shape women’s movement from beliefs and behaviors that suggest that they are ‘dying from’ this disease to attitudes and actions consistent with the notion that they can ‘live with’ HIV.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 73 words || 
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5. Worley, Debra. "Teaching Communication Ethics as a Means of How We Live Our Lives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p365749_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The first paper explores the structure, content, pedagogy, and justification for the Senior Capstone course in Communication Ethics. Broadly understood, ethics can be judged on a right-wrong dimension involving significant influence on others. The study of communication ethics helps students recognize their moral obligations as communicators and assists them in understanding and tolerating disagreements. The paper discusses the impact of a communication ethics capstone on potential employment, portfolio development, Internships, and continuing education.

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