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2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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1. Lee, Peter. "What's the Lived Reality? Global Health through Ethnography: Realizing Narratives of Being and Lived Experiences, Understanding Global Struggles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1113581_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While medical brigades provide a transnational experience, student participants nevertheless fail to fully comprehend global struggles as they are limited by their brief, biomedical interactions with communities. Ethnography has the potentiality to not only dispel top-down approaches of biomedicine which regard health as merely the absence of disease or infirmity but more importantly, enrich understandings of global issues that deter the health of marginalized and neglected people living in poverty. By navigating historical, political, economic and social contexts, ethnography develops a framework not to life but rather to living. As further inquiry reveals a constant process of negotiating survival, this framework through ethnography simultaneously grounds lived experiences, enables a cultural consciousness of students, activists, physicians and future global health actors to discern the current, transnational existing dynamics of hegemony and power as manifestations of disparity in the local context, but more importantly rehumanize and repoliticize on the ground realities.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7845 words || 
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2. Doan, Alesha. "Saving Lives or Killing Lives? Framing the Debate about Stem Cell Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211367_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Morality politics are often simplified and framed in elementary and non-technical language by active participants. But what happens when the morality issue does not lend itself to simplified frames for public and political debate? Stem cell research poses this problem for elites who oppose this type of research on moralistic grounds and liken it to the abortion debate where an “innocent” life is being “killed.” Yet, stem cell research is complicated and the potential benefits are far reaching, making it a more difficult issue to frame in “black and white” terms. What arguments do supporters and opponents use to frame the embryonic stem cell research debate? Does the public view stem cell research as a morality issue? What is the public’s support for stem cell research, and what factors shape an individual’s support for or opposition to stem cell research? Namely, do religious and political factors play similar roles in shaping opinions about stem cell research as they do in other morality issues? This research uses a unique public opinion survey of Georgian voters conducted in September 2006 to investigate public opinion in the stem cell research controversy.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 7015 words || 
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3. Unson, Christine., Mahoney-Trella, Patricia. and Chowdhury, Sutopa. "Older African-American women's strategies for living long and healthy lives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113094_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Objective: This study investigated how a diverse group of older African-American women evaluated aging and their courses of action to live long and healthy lives. Methods: Thirty-seven older women were interviewed in-depth in their homes. Questions included: “What do you like and do not like about growing old?” and “What would you attribute your long life to?” Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded twice. Responses were classified into: financially independent/healthy, financially dependent/healthy, financially independent/not healthy and financially dependent/not healthy groups. Results: Average age was 77.7 years;50 percent were homeowners; 34 percent were subsidized housing residents; 58 percent lived alone. Declining health and limited financial resources reduced opportunities to pursue well-being in old age. Financially independent/healthy women enumerated multiple positive elements whereas financially dependent/not healthy women enumerated numerous negative elements about growing old. Financially independent/not healthy women and financially dependent/healthy women were limited by their lack of mobility and resources to pursue opportunities for well-being, respectively. The women’s strategies for living long and healthy lives had both physical and mental elements. The most cited physical and mental health strategies were avoiding risk behaviors, having a positive outlook, maintaining relationships with family, friends and a divinity, and altruism. Conclusions: Health promotional efforts should consider the health and financial status of the individual. The unhealthy groups would benefit most from treatment interventions both for physical and mental needs. Financially independent/healthy women could benefit from preventive interventions since their concerns rested with future health deterioration.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 24 pages || Words: 10192 words || 
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4. McHugh, Mary. "Live from New York: The impact of Saturday Night Live and late night talk shows on the 2008 Presidential Election Race" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360378_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will explore how television comedy shows (Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, the Tonight Show and the Late Show) affected the 2008 Presidential Election Race. Due to the writers strike these shows were dark during the early primary races – leaving an intriguing void in the media coverage of the race. After the strike was settled, the coverage of the race seemed to change as did popular perception of the candidates. Saturday Night Live is getting high ratings based on its political skits and candidates seek out any opportunity to be a guest on a nightly show. Studies have shown that younger voters are getting their news more from Jon Stewart than from Brian Williams which means that these sketches and appearances have a great effect on how the public views the candidates and the election. This paper intends to consider these effects in the hopes of determining how much of an impact these shows have on the election and its results

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 463 words || 
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5. Roman, Elda. "Living Easy, Living Uneasily: Minority Middle Class Narratives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p412807_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In this presentation, I analyze Mexican American and African American middle-class narratives from the 1980s to the 2000s. I offer a paradigm for understanding the contemporary minority middle class that exemplifies how literary and popular forms serve as textual analogs to actual historical and social concerns. By looking at novels, films, memoirs, and television shows I explain how the story of the minority middle class differs from that of the middle class at large. I consider journalist Barbara Ehrenreich’s theory that the U.S. middle class, or professional middle class, as she calls it, is characterized by the “fear of falling.” Ehrenreich bases her definition on the group’s professionalism; since this group cannot pass down professionalism like property, each subsequent generation shares a fear of falling. I argue, however, that the minority middle class has a more specific fear— that misrecognition.

I demonstrate that post-1980s texts dramatize a fierce anxiety about misrecognition due to the homogenizing of ethnic experience and the ways in which betrayal of class get linked to betrayal of culture. For example, I show how the past decade has seen the emergence of a counter-identity politics in Chicana/o cultural production, evident in the rising number of works featuring middle-class characters. Since Chicana/o identity has been historically wedded to a working-class identity due to Chicano cultural nationalism, this new phenomenon suggests cultural producers are widening the scope of representation to dislodge the idea that upward mobility necessarily means cultural betrayal. Through analyses of Richard Rodriguez’s Hunger of Memory (1984) and the sitcom, The George Lopez Show (2001-2007), and Michele Serros’ Honey Blond Chica (2005), I illustrate the ways in which Chicano texts foreground the anxiety about creating middle class representations and maintaining middle class status.

After covering some of the sincere attempts Chicanos have made to bring into visibility alternative class identities, I discuss the ironic portrayals of black middle classness in Percival Everett’s novel, Erasure (2001) and Spike Lee’s film Bamboozled (2000), arguing that these texts are modifying the tradition of the African American passing narrative. Rather than having black characters pass for white, they depict characters exhibiting what I term “experiential passing,” which I explain as the performance of an identity that is supposedly informed by certain experiences, such as that of a lower-class urban upbringing, in order to critique the essentialization and pathologizing of black experience.

As of now, there is no cultural analysis at all on the Mexican American middle class and no comparative work on the African American and the Mexican American middle classes. By researching their contrasting histories my work illuminates aspects of each in ways that are obscured when each is analyzed separately, thus bridging different disciplines and ethnic histories through an examination of varied and socially fraught texts.

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