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2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 1170 words || 
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1. Ali, Christopher. "“Local and Local and Local, local”: Conversations With Regulators About the Future of Media Localism in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639729_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper engages with the conceptual, definitional and operational challenges in regulating media localism through interviews with regulators in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. This paper will report on these interviews, and review the similarities and differences therein. While analysis is ongoing, potential emergent themes include how regulators are thinking through these important definitional and operational challenges, an expressed hope for the future success of local television, and an ongoing commitment to these aforementioned territorial-based definitions. Ultimately, it will be suggested that the importance of considering the future of media localism and its disparate definitional, conceptual, and operational boundaries is not about cementing definitions, but rather in the conversations themselves. Regulators need to be aware of the many facets comprising a local media ecosystem and the changing nature of “the local” in order to properly regulate the media platforms under their jurisdiction.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8863 words || 
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2. Trivette, Shawn. "How Local is Local? Determining the Boundaries of Local Food in Practice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/DOWNLOAD>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562457_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While local food has gained considerable popularity in recent years, attempts have only recently emerged to articulate what local means, with no clear consensus as to what "counts" as local. This paper contributes to this growing discussion by examining farms and food-vendors (such as restaurants, grocery stores, and food processors) in southern New England that self-identify as local; in particular I focus on the range of distances they travel to sell or purchase food. Drawing primarily on a social network data set of farm and food-vendor connections across the regions, this study ultimately asks: what are the forces and conditions that influence the range of travel for local food? I find that the greatest influences on how far local food travels are number of ties to other local food entities, what type of farm or food-vendor they are, size (for farms), and urban proximity (for food-vendors).

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 3972 words || 
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3. Schaap, Linze. "Institutional Reform of European Local Politics and its Impact on Local Democracy. Revitalization by Means of Directly Elected Mayors and a Separation of Local Powers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p279974_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Western European countries differ according to the ways in which they organize local government, not least in the manner in which mayors are selected, in the mayors’ statutory positions and responsibilities, and the institutional relations between the council and the mayor/executive board. The institutional arrangements have been modified in several countries. Focal question in the paper is whether the institutional reforms have resulted in a revitalization of local politics and democracy.

A first measure to revitalize local politics is a separation of local political powers. In Germany, the UK, Italy, and the Netherlands powers of the council as the representation of the citizenry at the one hand, and the Mayor or the Executive Board at the other, have been separated. They now both have their more or less exclusive statutory powers, tasks and responsibilities, in some cases resulting from the introduction of directly elected mayors. Question then is, whether these policies lead to a revitalization of local politics.

Secondly, in a number of Western European countries governments have introduced direct elections for the mayor’s office. Despite differences between countries, in all cases the assumption is, that direct mayoral elections do make a difference and that directly elected mayors will appear to be strong leaders. Question, however is to what extent is mayoral performance affected by selection procedures and the statutory position of the mayoral office? The results of a number of comparative empirical studies will be presented in the paper. It will become clear that there are huge differences in mayoral performance. Several factors influencing that performance will be identified. The most important conclusion is that mayoral selection procedures and statutory positions do affect mayoral performance, although not as much as expected. Other factors are at stake.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 375 words || 
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4. Campbell, Susanna. and Donnay, Karsten. "Subnational Violence and Aid: Why Local Conflict May Encourage Local Development" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125353_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What is the effect of violent conflict on sub-national development in conflict-affected countries? Cross-national studies find that these countries, overall, have much lower rates of development than more stable countries receiving similar amounts of aid (Collier 2003). These studies, however, fail to capture important variation in both violence and development at the sub-national level. We argue that violent conflict may have the exact opposite local effect on development than it has at the national level: local conflict leads to the allocation of more aid to conflict-affected districts, contributing to increased development in these often impoverished districts.

We empirically test this proposition through sub-national analyses of violent conflict, aid, and development in four conflict-affected countries – Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Afghanistan, and Iraq. We show that increases in levels of sub-national violence at the highest-level administrative district (Admin1) are associated with increases in local development as measured through night lights, which has been shown to be a reliable indicator of development (Weidmann and Schutte 2015). We systematically confirm that this increase in local development is conditioned by the amount of humanitarian and development aid allocated to this administrative unit. Qualitative studies of the local political economy of aid in conflict-affected countries corroborate this finding, showing that international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), private contractors, and international donors respond to violent conflict by establishing local offices and allocating aid to these administrative districts (Jennings 2015; Autesserre 2014; Terry 2002). We conduct our analysis using data on aid allocation in these countries between 1992 and 2013 (AidData 2015), night lights data (NOAA 2015), and sub-national conflict data (UCDP 2015, ACLED 2015). Our study uses statistical matching to select sub-national administrative districts that are comparable in terms of covariates associated with local-level development. Within this sample we then estimate the effect of local violent conflict on development conditional on the amount of aid provided in this locale.

Our findings have important implications for existing studies of the effect of aid and conflict on development, contributing crucial sub-national analysis to a literature dominated by cross-national studies. The findings also point to the perverse incentives that international aid may create for local conflict actors, demonstrating that local violence may in fact lead to increased, rather than decreased, local wealth (Terry 2002).

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Strohl, Jared. "Urban Agriculture: Can it Benefit Local Ecologies and Local Communities?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255477_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I use ethnographic data from an urban farm in a postindustrial city to explore the concept of mutual benefit, and highlight its relevance for sociological inquiry. Building on research focusing on human-nonhuman interaction, the first part of the paper uses participant ethnographic data to examine the unfolding relations between people and urban land as they transform urban dirt into agricultural soil. Using insights from research on food justice, the second part of the paper examines how the farm directly impacts local residents. These residents are predominantly African American socially distinct from the predominantly white and middle-to-upper class Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) members that do not live near the farm. These two parts—one focusing on nonhuman and the other on human relations—converge on a similar concept of mutual benefit. Urban farming represents a mutually beneficial relationship that can exist between humans and nonhumans through a land transformation that fosters significant biodiversity. Similarly, urban agriculture can also confer benefits to both local residents and the urban entrepreneurs working the farm, particularly after the construction of a farm-stand that improved food access and food sovereignty for the residents.

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