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2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 1170 words || 
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1. Ali, Christopher. "“Local and Local and Local, local”: Conversations With Regulators About the Future of Media Localism in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639729_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper engages with the conceptual, definitional and operational challenges in regulating media localism through interviews with regulators in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. This paper will report on these interviews, and review the similarities and differences therein. While analysis is ongoing, potential emergent themes include how regulators are thinking through these important definitional and operational challenges, an expressed hope for the future success of local television, and an ongoing commitment to these aforementioned territorial-based definitions. Ultimately, it will be suggested that the importance of considering the future of media localism and its disparate definitional, conceptual, and operational boundaries is not about cementing definitions, but rather in the conversations themselves. Regulators need to be aware of the many facets comprising a local media ecosystem and the changing nature of “the local” in order to properly regulate the media platforms under their jurisdiction.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8863 words || 
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2. Trivette, Shawn. "How Local is Local? Determining the Boundaries of Local Food in Practice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/DOWNLOAD>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562457_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While local food has gained considerable popularity in recent years, attempts have only recently emerged to articulate what local means, with no clear consensus as to what "counts" as local. This paper contributes to this growing discussion by examining farms and food-vendors (such as restaurants, grocery stores, and food processors) in southern New England that self-identify as local; in particular I focus on the range of distances they travel to sell or purchase food. Drawing primarily on a social network data set of farm and food-vendor connections across the regions, this study ultimately asks: what are the forces and conditions that influence the range of travel for local food? I find that the greatest influences on how far local food travels are number of ties to other local food entities, what type of farm or food-vendor they are, size (for farms), and urban proximity (for food-vendors).

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 3972 words || 
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3. Schaap, Linze. "Institutional Reform of European Local Politics and its Impact on Local Democracy. Revitalization by Means of Directly Elected Mayors and a Separation of Local Powers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p279974_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Western European countries differ according to the ways in which they organize local government, not least in the manner in which mayors are selected, in the mayors’ statutory positions and responsibilities, and the institutional relations between the council and the mayor/executive board. The institutional arrangements have been modified in several countries. Focal question in the paper is whether the institutional reforms have resulted in a revitalization of local politics and democracy.

A first measure to revitalize local politics is a separation of local political powers. In Germany, the UK, Italy, and the Netherlands powers of the council as the representation of the citizenry at the one hand, and the Mayor or the Executive Board at the other, have been separated. They now both have their more or less exclusive statutory powers, tasks and responsibilities, in some cases resulting from the introduction of directly elected mayors. Question then is, whether these policies lead to a revitalization of local politics.

Secondly, in a number of Western European countries governments have introduced direct elections for the mayor’s office. Despite differences between countries, in all cases the assumption is, that direct mayoral elections do make a difference and that directly elected mayors will appear to be strong leaders. Question, however is to what extent is mayoral performance affected by selection procedures and the statutory position of the mayoral office? The results of a number of comparative empirical studies will be presented in the paper. It will become clear that there are huge differences in mayoral performance. Several factors influencing that performance will be identified. The most important conclusion is that mayoral selection procedures and statutory positions do affect mayoral performance, although not as much as expected. Other factors are at stake.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 6383 words || 
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4. Binder, Michael., Childers, Matthew. and Hopkins, Andrew. "In Voters’ Minds, Are All Politics Really Local? Comparing Voters’ Knowledge of National and Local Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1074488_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the debate over whether citizens are knowledgeable enough to make competent electoral choices, the evidence clearly shows that Americans do not know much about politics beyond basic facts about government and their elected leaders. Given that media coverage makes national politics more prominent than local politics, it is logical to assume that Americans are even less knowledge about local politics than national politics. Recent research has begun to make the case that people are at least as familiar with local politics as they are national politics, if not more. In this study, we surveyed a random sample of likely voters in Jacksonville, Florida about local and national politics during a municipal election campaign. Despite the fact that we conducted our study in an environment that favors parity in knowledge between national and local politics, our evidence casts serious doubt about recent claims that people know as much about local issues and local government as they do about national issues and national government.

2015 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 150 words || 
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5. Gerber, Brian. "Local Elected Officials and Local Public Administrators: Understanding Commitment, Discretion and Innovation on Climate Change Policy and Practice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, Louisiana, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p950653_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Local governments in the United States are increasingly being recognized as policy leaders and innovators on climate change mitigation and adaptation. Standard policy theoretic approaches present this as behavior not easily explained; the incentive structure facing local governments for a global transboundary problem is geared toward inaction. The reality is the local governments do routinely engage in policy leadership and innovation, and I argue here that such behavior is driven to an important degree by the commitment of local elected officials to a policy goal and to broad grants of discretion to administrators who use such latitude to develop innovative management practices and to help shape local policy. Understanding this basic dynamic is key to understanding why local governments are key leaders on climate change policy issues. I test this argument using data gathered from a national survey of local elected officials and local agency administrators.

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