Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 73 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 15 - Next  Jump:
2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 151 words || 
Info
1. Gnehm, Michael. "The Nature of Architecture: From Locus Amoenus to Locus Terribilis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p749995_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In the Early Renaissance, architecture is met with descriptions that implement it in its larger context of a perfect world (locus amoenus) or a less perfect one (locus terribilis). I will discuss their rhetorics in examples that especially employ prosopopoeia: Leonardo Bruni’s praise of Florence (1404), Enea Silvio Piccolomini’s praise of Basel (1438), the latter’s description – in hisrole as pope Pius II – of his building commissions in Pienza (c. 1460) and his critique of San Francesco in Rimini as a means of condemning Sigismondo Malatesta. As I will argue, their use of prosopopoeia with its ensuing architectural personifications incorporates the subjective situation of the describer: his competing as a writer with architecture, but also with other texts, their authors and (political) positions. Thus, the ascribing of voice to architecture can be seen as the trace of the difficulty of describing the nature of architecture as something different to language.

2013 - ILA's Women and Leadership Affinity Group Inaugural Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8697 words || 
Info
2. Tonkin, Thomas. "THE EFFECTS OF LOCUS OF CONTROL AND GENDER ON IMPLICIT LEADERSHIP PERCEPTION" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ILA's Women and Leadership Affinity Group Inaugural Conference, Asilomar Conference Grounds, Pacific Grove, CA, Jun 09, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p645128_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study utilizes implicit leadership theories, as well as locus of control instrumentation to analyze perceived leadership differences between males and females. Specifically, the dimensions of implicit leadership analyze; dedication, tyranny, and attractiveness are analyzed, while locus of control and masculinity are posited as independent variables and gender as a moderating variable. Results from the regression analysis and associated explanation of those results are included as well as suggestions for further research in this area.

2015 - Southwestern Social Science Association 95th Annual Meeting Words: 256 words || 
Info
3. Serna, Xavier. and Pals, Heili. "Parental Incarceration and Adolescent Negative Self-Feelings: The Moderating Role of Locus of Control" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 95th Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt Denver, Denver, Colorado, Apr 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p987961_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Increasingly, studies focus on the effects of parental incarceration on children’s deviance (Aaron and Dallaire 2010) and on internalizing and externalizing behaviors (Lee et al. 2013; Kjellstrand and Eddy 2011; Murray and Farrington 2008; Murray and Farrington 2005). Our own previous investigation of parental incarceration shows that it also leads to negative self-feelings (a combination of depression, anxiety, and self-derogation, or negative self-feelings) for children (Serna and Pals 2014). We propose to extend this research to identify factors that enhance or inhibit the negative effect of parental incarceration on children’s self-feelings. We hypothesize that the incarceration effect is stronger for those adolescents who have external, rather than internal locus of control. Similarly, we anticipate that the effect is enhanced the more the child places importance on the parent (i.e., belief that it is important what the parent thinks of the child). Knowing what factors enhance or inhibit the negative effect of parental incarceration on children’s mental health has strong policy implications guiding the creation of support programs for children of incarcerated parents. We use KLAMS data, a longitudinal, multi-generational dataset on parents and children and their deviant adaptations to test the effects of parental incarceration on children’s negative self-feelings (Kaplan & Lin 2005). The parents’ incarceration data is collected retrospectively when they were about 35-40 years old. Children’s social psychological characteristics are measured in adolescence (12-13 years old), and in young adulthood (20-24 years old). We use interaction effects to test the hypotheses about the moderating effects of locus of control and importance of parent.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 274 words || 
Info
4. Kisselburgh, Lorraine. "Challenging the locus of power: Wearable technologies, self-quantification, and the empowered individual" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1106840_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In Foucault’s Discipline and Punish (1995), he posits that space, time, and behavior are organized, or regulated, to exert disciplining power over the behavior of individuals in prisons. Foucault uses Bentham’s panopticon architecture to illustrate the disempowering effects of constant surveillance and visibility, achieved through an architecture of space. Continuing this tension of powerful institutions threatening individual privacy, Westin’s (1967) research on privacy focused attention on the ability of individuals to retain control over institutional intrusions into data about their lives, by maintaining the right to determine how personal information is disclosed to others. Similarly, Petronio (2002) examined the ways in which individuals manage boundaries of self-disclosure, regulating information as a means to balance power in relational dynamics.

While privacy theory has typically focused on the power that is wielded by governments, institutions, and large-scale social collectives (e.g., SNS) when individual privacy is violated, less often examined are cases in which the locus of power resides with the individual, or the less-empowered subject. In this session, using wearable technologies and ubiquitous collection of personal data as reference points, I reframe traditional tensions between privacy, power, and control, and discuss how emerging data and technology forms create opportunities for empowerment. I discuss three specific cases -- a) wearable cameras for reality data mining (e.g. GoPro; Wilhoit & Kisselburgh, 2015); b) sociometric badges for interaction captures (Kisselburgh et al., 2015); and c) personal data trackers (e.g., AppleWatch) -- along with the emerging Quantified Self (Felton, 2015) movement. Repositioning the lens of these tensions provides us with an opportunity to rethink theoretical treatments of privacy from the perspective of the individual, living and communicating with power.

2005 - American Sociological Association Words: 1 words || 
Info
5. Perlow, Olivia. "The Effects of Group Identity and Perceived Discrimination on the Locus of Control" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p34857_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 15 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy