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2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 118 words || 
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1. Koerner, Margaret. "William Kentridge: Long, Long, Long Live the (Mother) Land" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p929010_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: With the end of apartheid in 1994, William Kentridge became widely known outside his native South Africa. The son of prominent lawyers in Johannesburg and the grandson of a life-long member of parliament, Kentridge was raised in a home where political convictions were urgently and profoundly felt. His work reflects this context, but also a longing for the distant and melancholy world of Franz Schubert and Italo Svevo. Kentridge explores an ever-expanding range of media and is his own best critic: his public lectures on the creative process are as seminal as his opera productions, animated films and drawings. This paper will consider Kentridge as a latter-day Renaissance master who tests the powers and limits of human making.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 36 pages || Words: 9590 words || 
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2. Toft, Peter. and Duero, Arash. "Reliable in the Long Run? Petroleum policies and long-term oil supplier reliability" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500777_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Accelerating oil import dependence in energy consuming nations highlights the importance of having energy supplies at sufficient levels and at stable and reasonable prices. Consequently, it is crucial that oil exporters realize their full production potential. Current debates on energy security are often focused on short-term risks e.g. sudden disruptions due to wars, domestic instability etc. However, when it comes to assessing oil supplier reliability it is equally important to assess their longer term ability and willingness to deliver oil to the global market. This study analyzes the effects of petroleum policies on crude oil production trends in 14 major oil producing countries (2000-2010) by focusing on the political-institutional frameworks that shape the investment conditions for the upstream oil sector. Our findings indicate that countries with closed resource-nationalist oil sector frameworks dominated by state-ownership systematically performed worse than countries with investor friendly and privatized sectors. The findings indicate that assessments based on remaining reserves and planned production capacities alone could inflate expectations about future oil supplies in a world where remaining crude reserves are located in countries with unfavorable investment frameworks.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 228 words || 
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3. Pettigrew, Stephen. "The Downstream Effects of Long Lines: How long waits at the precinct depress future turnout" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1080033_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the 2012 presidential election, approximately five million voters waited longer than an hour to cast their ballot. Long lines at precincts have become a popular topic in the literature about election administration, although most work to date has focused on the factors which create lines. In this paper, I investigate the impact that lines themselves have on future political participation. In particular, I test the hypothesis that waiting in a long line in one election will result in a voter being less likely to vote in the subsequent election. I use several sources of data to analyze this question. Panel survey data allows me to track individual wait times and turnout across elections. Precinct closing times provide an objective proxy of line length in several states. Each of these sources, as well as others, suggest that experiencing a long line depresses turnout in subsequent elections. Voters in precincts with lines in excess of one hour are between one and two percentage point less likely to turn out in the next general election. These effects, although seemingly small, are a similar magnitude to those found from get-out-the-vote experiments. Placebo tests using absentee voters suggest that this conclusion is not driven by selection bias or effect confounding. This result yield normative concerns given that the existing literature has established that long lines are more likely to afflict non-white precincts.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 208 words || 
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4. Goodall, Harold. "Writing Like a Man in Textville, Baby: Narrative Seduction, Short Sentences, and the Long, Long(ing) Gaze" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p256226_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Narrative seduction is a readerly and writerly collaboration mediated by suasory texts, and they are designed to invite in the imagination, distort realities, delight the senses and move the story along. As is the case in any seduction, the rhetorical process is powerful and the narrative results often delicious, deflective, a little disturbing and potentially dangerous. In this paper I will explore, in a self-reflexive manner, narrative seductions as they work in texts. My goal is to ask questions about how narrative seductions, operating under the label of “fiction,” “creative nonfiction/memoir,” and “autoethnography” allow authors to “get away with” or at least to deflect attention away from their depictions, which otherwise may be found deeply offensive to their readers. What is the “work” that these textual seductions serve? Do they help readers (and writers) understand better the various complexities of human thoughts, passions, and actions? Do they provide textual space to expose and maybe exorcise demons? Do they enable textual interrogations of otherwise “unspeakable” situations and characters? Or are they, as may also be the case in any form of seduction, ways to use the playful allure of the erotic to mask true feelings of power, passion, and control.

2011 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 244 words || 
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5. Tranche, Irati. "Conditional Cash Transfers as Long-term Programmes: An Appropriate Tool for Development in the Long-run?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, Madrid, Spain, Jun 23, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505305_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: After World War II, and following some Keynesian principles, the Welfare State was implanted in the European countries believing to be the correct system to spread all around the world. However, during the last decades, the neoliberalism came into the international policy sector reducing the social development towards monetarism and conservative political streams. The social protection has been narrowing not only targeting but also in terms of framework. The last crisis has put in a difficult financial situation the world, and according to the international institutions’ guidelines a reduction of the social budget has been made. In this context, the Conditional Cash Transfers (CCTs), which started to be implemented in the 90s, have been becoming more used, and it seems that the coming years this will be the pattern. These programmes which began in the developing countries have been seen as adequate projects in developed countries as well, and the money spent on them is increasing. CCTs however, are really controversial, and there are some key aspects worthy to note. In order to understand these issues better some empirical cases will be shown. The Colombian and Nicaraguan CCTs will show that even if overall the outcomes are positive, this view might be too narrow to consider as the tool for development. For that reason, the long-term poverty related issues will be addressed, not just the direct ones, but also others that explain the broader and complex pictures of the society such as the labour-market.

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