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2013 - Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 116 words || 
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1. Anne Harris, Anne. and Gandolfo, Enza. "Looked at and looked over or: I wish I was adopted" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 15, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633607_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through collaborative narrative writing, in this presentation we redeploy the sense of refugeity present in our singular narratives to co-construct creative scholarship that becomes a feminist space to belong. Drawing on feminist spatiality and performative ethnography, narrative collaborations awkwardly embrace our mutual and sometimes contradictory senses of self, kinship and identity performance. The co-constructed nature of this article reflects contemporary developments in qualitative creative research acknowledging researcher/writers as situated gendered, sexualized and encultured subjects within particular global and local contexts. This presentation’s performative structure is utilized here to foreground the collaborative intersubjectivity from which our research and the desire to research arises, and as an experiment in ‘mapping changing subjectivities through narrative’ (Vacchelli 2011, 781).

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 483 words || 
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2. Heck, Alison. and Panneton, Robin. "Are you looking where I'm looking? Examining the relationship between parent and infant attention to emotions using eye-tracking." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962392_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the immense interest in emotion processing in infancy, few studies have examined how infants’ emotion processing correlates with that of their own parents. The primary aim for the current study was to examine the relationships between infants’ gaze patterns on static images of various emotion expressions (i.e. first look, fixation duration, fixation count) with their own parent’s gaze patterns. Of additional interest was how infant and parent characteristics (e.g. depression and anxiety symptomology, infant temperament) relate to their respective gaze patterns on adult emotion displays.
Using a Tobii© T60 eye-tracking system, we presented pairs of emotions from the NimStim set to 12-month-old infants and their mothers. We presented happy-neutral, happy-sad, and sad-neutral pairs in four blocks, counterbalancing side and order of presentation across trials, for a total of 12 trials. Additionally, we presented pairs of happy-fear, sad-fear, and neutral-fear one time each at the end of the sequence. Side and order of presentation was counterbalanced across participants. During each appointment, the parent was eye-tracked on the emotion sequence first, immediately followed by the infant. The infant was facing away from the monitor while the parent was being tracked so as to avoid any prior exposure to the task.
Preliminary results using Pearson bivariate correlations indicate some correspondence between infant-parent scanning patterns of these emotion displays. In particular, infants and parents are aligned in which expression they direct their gaze to first. For example, there was a trend for a positive correlation between infants and parents for their likelihood to look at a fear face first vs. a sad face when paired together (r=0.61, p=.08). Additionally, there was a marginally significant, positive correlation (r=0.87, p=.06) between time spent on the fear face for the infant and the neutral face for the parent. There was an unexpected finding in which the fixation duration to the happy face in the pair was negatively correlated (r= -0.91, p=.01) between parent and infant. However, infants tended to look for shorter amounts of time on the happy face (M=22.04) than the neutral (M=28.28), sad (M=34.07), or fear (M=36.45) faces, whereas parents looked relatively equally across these paired expressions. Additionally, infants had significantly fewer overall fixations compared to the parents (F=49.28, p<.01, η2p =.93; MInfant=10.47, SD=2.3; MParent=17.50, SD=3.57; t= -6.24, p<.01), which may indicate that infants may have had longer individual fixations or that infants looked off the faces altogether at times. Other measures of interest examining participant characteristics will be analyzed. These measures include both a depression and anxiety screener for the parents and a temperament questionnaire for the infant.
In conclusion, these preliminary findings suggest that, in general, infant looking behaviors are more similar to other infants rather than to their parents, but there are intriguing findings regarding first look tendencies. For example, this may indicate the beginnings of biases towards certain emotions based on learned information from the environment (e.g. a mother’s reaction to a stranger).

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Colombo, John., Shaddy, D., Carlson, Susan., Gustafson, Kathleen., Gajewski, Byron., Kerling, Elizabeth., Thodosoff, Jocelynn., Doty, Tasha. and Walsh, Katlin. "Glances, Interrupted Looks, and Latency to Look in Infant Visual Habituation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957085_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Visual habituation is a long-standing method for the study of cognition in human infants. The primary variable from habituation is duration of looking, but several other measurable visual behaviors that occur within the habituation session are typically ignored or left unanalyzed. Assuming that parameters are set for the definition of a valid look (e.g., 1 second for a valid look and 1 second for a valid termination; Colombo & Horowitz, 1985), the infant may make brief “glances” of less than 1 second to the habituation stimulus prior to the attainment of a valid look, and the look may also be “interrupted” with lookaways that do not terminate the valid look because they are less than 1 second. In addition, the period between the presentation of the stimulus and the onset of a valid look may be considered as a “latency” to look. These three behaviors (glances, interruptions, and latency) are schematically depicted in Figure 1. This presentation is based on a longitudinal study of 230 infants measured on infant-controlled visual habituation (augmented with simultaneous heart rate measures) at 4, 6, and 9 months of age. The aim here is to describe the developmental course of these behaviors, and to determine what these behaviors might represent by examining their relation to other more commonly analyzed variables from habituation: look duration, heart rate, and time spent in HR-defined phases (Richards & Casey, 1992). Mixed model analyses including Age as a factor (with number of looks to habituation entered as a covariate) were conducted on glances, interruptions, and latency to look (see Figure 2); the number of glances did not change with age, but interruptions significantly decreased (p=.023), and latency to look significantly declined (p<.001). We conducted correlational (controlling for age) and mixed-model analyses (with Age as a co-factor) to examine how individual differences on these variables might relate to visual and physiological indices of attention; the results of these analyses were highly convergent and suggested that these variables may reflect very different underlying processes. Infants with longer latencies tended to have shorter duration looking, spent more time in Orienting (OR) and less time in Sustained Attention (SA) and Attention Termination (AT). Glances were not strongly related to look duration, but infants who made more glances tended to have higher heart rates during the habituation session, and also showed more OR, less SA, and less AT. In contrast, infants with look interruptions looked for longer durations, less OR, more SA, and more AT; interruptions were unrelated to individual differences in infant HR. The pattern of results suggested that Latency to Look and Glances might reflect some level of initial arousal or engagement of attention; the findings for Interruptions suggested some indication of infants’ ability to disengage fixation from the visual stimulus. A principal component analysis of the three variables lent support to this alignment, yielding a single factor accounting for 49% of the variance with positive loadings on Glances (.831) and Latency (.860) but a negative loading Interruptions (-.257).

2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 101 words || 
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4. Race, Megan. "Looking Back to Look Forward: Alexei Ratmansky's Revival of 'The Bright Stream' at the Bolshoi and in the West" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1020528_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In 2003, ballet master and choreographer Alexei Ratmansky presented a reconstruction of the 1935 drambalet “The Bright Stream” (Svetlyi ruchei) at the Bolshoi. The ballet, which was specifically targeted in the infamous Pravda article "Baletnaia fal'sh" and banned soon after its original premiere, was quite well received in its contemporary iteration, first in Russia and, most recently, at the American Ballet Theatre in New York City. This paper looks at the function of the highly politicized medium of ballet and its metamorphosis under Putin through the lens of a ballet that has from the start been at the center of controversy.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Treem, Jeffrey., Pearce, Katy., Evans, Sandra., Vitak, Jessica., Schrock, Andrew., Barta, Kristen., Ford, Jacob. and Shorey, Samantha. "Looking Back to Look Forward: Tracing the History of Affordances to Develop a Framework for Understanding Communication Technology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107095_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An affordances perspective is gaining popularity in communication as a theoretical path between technological determinism and social constructivism. Yet, the proliferation of scholarship with different operational definitions, ontological foundations, and analytical approaches makes it difficult for scholars to compare findings and advance communication theory related to affordances. In this paper, we review the history of affordances work in human computer interaction (HCI), information systems, and sociology. We delineate how affordances frameworks have been used, and address the types of research questions and phenomena on which these traditions tend to focus. We conclude by presenting an agenda for how affordances can facilitate research on communication technologies. Specifically, we describe how these traditions emphasize actor, technology, and action orientations, and how these orientations connect with perceived, functional, and social affordances perspectives. By using an interdisciplinary, historical approach, this work offers scholars multiple paths for incorporating affordances into research on communication technologies.

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