Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,297 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 460 - Next  Jump:
2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Flemming, Felix., Dosenovic, Pero., Marcinkowski, Frank., Luenich, Marco. and Starke, Christopher. "Looking Closely or Looking the Other Way? How German Television Viewers Respond to the Precarious Issues of the Rio Olympics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1228658_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The 2016 Rio Olympics were overshadowed by negative developments in the global sports world and general difficulties of such mega events. Our study argues that these circumstances burden the untroubled enjoyment for the television viewers. The study aims to find out which strategies of coping with this burden are applied by the audience in regard to their reception behavior and which audience characteristics explain the choice for different response patterns. We conducted a conjoint analysis among 300 German television viewers. Measuring viewers’ preferences for varying portions of reporting on positive and negative facets of Rio 2016 and the sports world we identified three response patterns: ignoring the negative issues, escaping into the beautiful façade of Rio 2016, or favoring to get confronted with the problems of the event. Thereby, the viewers’ sports involvement, but not their political sophistication affects the response towards the (sport-) political aspects of sport mega events.

2018 - RSA Words: 149 words || 
Info
2. Stirling, Kirsten. ""As a picture looks upon him, that looks upon it": Cusanus in John Donne's Sermons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, Louisiana, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1294187_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: John Donne repeatedly draws on the works of Nicholas of Cusa in sermons preached between c. 1619 and 1622, during and soon after his chaplaincy to Viscount Doncaster’s embassy to Bohemia. Though Cusanus is never cited by name, these sermons contain clear allusions to the omnivoyant icon of De Visione Dei. Further references to this work and to De Docta Ignorantia suggest that Donne was particularly inspired by Cusanus’s use of spatial and visual metaphor to represent the divine, although Donne often uses these metaphors in quite different rhetorical contexts. This paper investigates how the diplomatic trip with Doncaster may have prompted or encouraged Donne’s appropriations of Nicholas of Cusa’s imagery, and to what extent the audiences of these particular sermons – specifically including James Hay, Viscount Doncaster and later Earl of Carlisle – might have been a factor in Donne’s interest in the Cusan’s work during these years.

2010 - 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions Words: 291 words || 
Info
3. Collins, Harry. "The Third Wave: Looking Back and Looking Forward" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting - Abstract and Session Submissions, Komaba I Campus, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p421741_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In my presentation I will outline the current state of play in work inspired by the Third Wave idea. We are now in a position to separate this work into two streams. First there is the technical business of exploring the nature of expertise and exploiting new methods, both qualitative and quantitative, for its investigation. This technical part of the programme can be referred to as Studies of Expertise and Experience (SEE). I will outline where this programme has been and where it is going, setting out its latest results and its prospects for the future. The second kind of work is more general. It can be thought as associated with the Weltanschauung of the Third Wave. SEE, then, is the technical programme of the political approach known as the Third Wave. The political approach is aimed at justifying the scientific values at the heart of the natural sciences, bringing scientific values back to the centre-stage of social science, and looking at the possibility of building a good society with scientific values at its heart. All this is to be done without going back to what has been called Wave One of science studies and without rejecting the crucial discoveries of Wave Two. The trick of Wave Three is to make central, not science’s findings? the province of Wave one ? nor the day-to-day practice of science ? the province of Wave Two ? but the values and aspirations of science. The broad political programme is called `elective modernism’ and this will be explained. The way the Third Wave’s political perspective bears upon the relationship of science and society will also be explained as will the way it varies from some interpretations of the `participatory turn’ in science policy.

2013 - Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 116 words || 
Info
4. Anne Harris, Anne. and Gandolfo, Enza. "Looked at and looked over or: I wish I was adopted" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 15, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633607_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through collaborative narrative writing, in this presentation we redeploy the sense of refugeity present in our singular narratives to co-construct creative scholarship that becomes a feminist space to belong. Drawing on feminist spatiality and performative ethnography, narrative collaborations awkwardly embrace our mutual and sometimes contradictory senses of self, kinship and identity performance. The co-constructed nature of this article reflects contemporary developments in qualitative creative research acknowledging researcher/writers as situated gendered, sexualized and encultured subjects within particular global and local contexts. This presentation’s performative structure is utilized here to foreground the collaborative intersubjectivity from which our research and the desire to research arises, and as an experiment in ‘mapping changing subjectivities through narrative’ (Vacchelli 2011, 781).

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 483 words || 
Info
5. Heck, Alison. and Panneton, Robin. "Are you looking where I'm looking? Examining the relationship between parent and infant attention to emotions using eye-tracking." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962392_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite the immense interest in emotion processing in infancy, few studies have examined how infants’ emotion processing correlates with that of their own parents. The primary aim for the current study was to examine the relationships between infants’ gaze patterns on static images of various emotion expressions (i.e. first look, fixation duration, fixation count) with their own parent’s gaze patterns. Of additional interest was how infant and parent characteristics (e.g. depression and anxiety symptomology, infant temperament) relate to their respective gaze patterns on adult emotion displays.
Using a Tobii© T60 eye-tracking system, we presented pairs of emotions from the NimStim set to 12-month-old infants and their mothers. We presented happy-neutral, happy-sad, and sad-neutral pairs in four blocks, counterbalancing side and order of presentation across trials, for a total of 12 trials. Additionally, we presented pairs of happy-fear, sad-fear, and neutral-fear one time each at the end of the sequence. Side and order of presentation was counterbalanced across participants. During each appointment, the parent was eye-tracked on the emotion sequence first, immediately followed by the infant. The infant was facing away from the monitor while the parent was being tracked so as to avoid any prior exposure to the task.
Preliminary results using Pearson bivariate correlations indicate some correspondence between infant-parent scanning patterns of these emotion displays. In particular, infants and parents are aligned in which expression they direct their gaze to first. For example, there was a trend for a positive correlation between infants and parents for their likelihood to look at a fear face first vs. a sad face when paired together (r=0.61, p=.08). Additionally, there was a marginally significant, positive correlation (r=0.87, p=.06) between time spent on the fear face for the infant and the neutral face for the parent. There was an unexpected finding in which the fixation duration to the happy face in the pair was negatively correlated (r= -0.91, p=.01) between parent and infant. However, infants tended to look for shorter amounts of time on the happy face (M=22.04) than the neutral (M=28.28), sad (M=34.07), or fear (M=36.45) faces, whereas parents looked relatively equally across these paired expressions. Additionally, infants had significantly fewer overall fixations compared to the parents (F=49.28, p<.01, η2p =.93; MInfant=10.47, SD=2.3; MParent=17.50, SD=3.57; t= -6.24, p<.01), which may indicate that infants may have had longer individual fixations or that infants looked off the faces altogether at times. Other measures of interest examining participant characteristics will be analyzed. These measures include both a depression and anxiety screener for the parents and a temperament questionnaire for the infant.
In conclusion, these preliminary findings suggest that, in general, infant looking behaviors are more similar to other infants rather than to their parents, but there are intriguing findings regarding first look tendencies. For example, this may indicate the beginnings of biases towards certain emotions based on learned information from the environment (e.g. a mother’s reaction to a stranger).

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 460 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy