Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,394 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 279 - Next  Jump:
2012 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 99 words || 
Info
1. Abdurraqib, Samaa. "Love for You, Love for Allah: Expressions of Love and Sexuality in Muslim Women's Memoirs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Oakland Marriott City Center, Oakland, CA, Nov 08, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p573195_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper looks at the articulation of love, romance, and relationships in popular memoirs and personal narratives by Muslim women. I argue that these personal narratives contest Western hegemonic views of Muslim women’s “secret lives” in two ways. First, they work against the notion of Muslim women who have no agency in their love lives and who are, at best, devoid of any sexuality. Second, by opening up space for different articulations of love (i.e., polygyny, abstinence, arranged marriages), these memoirs ask readers to consider love and relationships outside of the framework of popular Western notions of romantic attachments.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 18305 words || 
Info
2. Gaddy, Beverly. "Friendship, Neighbor-Love, and Enemy-Love: Kierkegaard's Works of Love as (Impossible) Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209268_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper posits an (impossible) politics of love through an examination of Soren Kierkegaard's Works of Love, which (it is argued) is perhaps one of Kierkegaard's most political works. Jacques Derrida's The Politics of Friendship and Carl Schmitt's The Concept of the Political, among other works, helps to demonstrate the political nature of Kierkegaard's model of Christian love.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 12251 words || 
Info
3. Park, Ji Hoon., Nam, Yoon Jae. and Kim, Sonho. "Why Don’t You Love Me As Much As I Love You?: Unrequited Love and Construction of Korean Diaspora in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2018-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112404_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When does a transnational community become a diaspora and why? This paper attempts to answer these questions by exploring the social constructed aspect of diaspora with a case study of Korean diaspora in the United States. The phenomenon of Korean diaspora encompasses a set of cultural, social and post-colonial relations between Korea and the United States for the past 100 years, as well as the internal racial relations and power structure within the United States. The unequal relationship between Korea and the United States has not only formed the motivational factors that promote Korean immigration to the United States, but also influenced the ways in which Korean immigrants experience America and position themselves in the United States. The racial hierarchy in the United States fosters a critical preconditional context in which Korean Americans maintain or seek out their ethnic identity and culture. The key argument in this paper is that Korean Americans’ retention or revival of diasporic identity is not so much a consequence of Koreans Americans’ inherent desire to maintain their ethnic heritage but rather an inevitable phenomenon in white-privileged society that marginalizes non-whites from mainstream social scenes.

2011 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 395 words || 
Info
4. Owens, Emily. "Making Love: Commercialized Sex and the Construction of Idealized Love" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, <Not Available>. 2018-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p508966_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: “Love” and “sex” are often thought together, but commercialized sex troubles popular associations of the two. The properties of exchange rendered so explicit within commercialized sex highlight power dynamics that undergird even the most intimate of sexual encounters. The sale of sex is popularly imagined as an exchange lacking in, and even opposed to “love,” one that sullies the idealized space of sexual intimacy between loving partners.

My paper mines the relationship of “love” and “sex” through the prism of commercialized sexual exchange. I tug at the conception of commercialized sex as antithetical to love, and argue that sex work upholds the fantasy that conflates love and non-commercial sexual intimacy by acting as its opposite. My paper suggests that the rhetorical and material realities of commercialized sex are predicated on a logic of containment, by which the taboo of power imbalance highlighted by sexual exchange becomes relegated to the world of sex work. This containment simultaneously enables the performance of sexual fantasy within a commercialized sexual encounter and upholds the fantasy of unsullied, egalitarian, idealized love outside. In other words, by performing sex, the realm of commercialized sexual exchange makes love.

My paper turns to the history of Storyville, a zone of legalized prostitution that thrived in the heart of New Orleans from 1898-1917. As a site in which legality, commercial success and taboo were always in tension, I show that Storyville reincarnates the discursive intersection of race, sex, and commerce of the antebellum era against a racial field fundamentally transformed by Emancipation and the birth of Jim Crow. To propogate the sale of racialized sexual fantasies, however, the proprieters of Storyville and the legal apparatus set up to regulate them obsess about the boundaries which would contain that exchange. I argue that this obsession with boundaries betrays an underlying logic of containment by which the fantasies performed within Storyville can only function to the extent that they also maintain the fantasy of their isolation from non-commercial, “loving” encounters that take place outside their bounds. Storyville’s collection of guidebooks, advertisements, and regulatory codes offers a uniquely explicit archive for the study of sexual exchange that crystallizes the importance of material and discursive boundaries to the establishment and maintenance of commercialized sex. Putting Storyville’s history in conversation with contemporary sex districts, my paper concludes by returning to the central problem of love in the politics of sexual exchange.

2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 243 words || 
Info
5. Reeskens, Tim. "For the Love of God and Love of the Country. Disentangling the Relation between Religious and National Identities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, Mar 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547844_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Contemporary Europe is characterized by religious pluralism, as certain nation-states are more secularized (France, Belgium) than others (Poland, Italy), and as religious traditions vary strongly (Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox belief). Despite a strong trend in declining religiosity, Europe is nevertheless characterized by both a religious and cultural réveil. Due to an increasing immigrant influx, Europeans have the feeling that their national identity is threatened while simultaneously, expressions of a Christian tradition are often endorsed in politicized debates, for instance about the prominence of the Judo-Christian inspiration in an enlarged European Union. While research on the relation between religious and national identity is flourishing in the US (Jacobs & Theiss-Morse, 2011), questions about how religious identity and attachment to the nation-state are related are absent across the Atlantic. The aim of this manuscript is to unravel the link between religious and national identities in the face of varying societal contexts. In order to disentangle this complex relationship, various data sources will be analyzed to triangulate the results. First of all, the 1995 and 2003 National Identity waves of the International Survey Program are analyzed. Secondly, these results are confronted with the 2008 wave of the European Values Study. The use of these cross-national datasets enables us not only to identify the association between religious and national identities across a vast set of European nation-states and time-points, but also to assess whether the strength of this association depends upon the cultural and religious national context.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 279 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy