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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Harvey, Brenna. "I'm Straight, I'm Thinking About Girls, and I'm Masturbating: Masculinity, Pornography, and Doing Gender" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1121129_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Theorizing the relationship between pornography and heterosexual men's investment in and enactment of hegemonic masculine practice—particularly overt sexism, the objectification of women, and violence against women—is longstanding and fraught territory in feminist research and activism. Drawing on interactional and post-structural theories of gender, I attempt to move beyond binary debates about whether or not pornography impacts heterosexual men's gender ideology or sexual practice to argue that pornography has a much more complex relationship to individual men's accomplishment of gender. Drawing on 15 in-depth life history interviews asking subjects to narrate their experiences of sexual learning, this article attempts to link debates about pornography to theories of gender, particularly theories of multiple masculinities. I argue not that pornography use has a direct causal relationship to gender outcomes, but that pornography use can become implicated in gender outcomes where pornography use and preferences are believed by individual men to signify inadequate or failed masculinity. I argue that where subjects did not feel their pornography use had any bearing on adequate or inadequate gender accomplishment, they experienced a greater security in departing from normative masculine forms over the life course, resulting in more egalitarian and pro-feminist gender ideology and sex practice. Where pornography use contributed to anxieties about inadequate or failed masculinity, subjects became more invested in the performance of normative masculinity and exhibited greater reluctance to depart from normative masculine forms over the life course. Implications for the maintenance of unequal gender relations are discussed.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10726 words || 
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2. Elsayed, Heba. "I'm Egyptian, I'm Muslim, But I'm Also Cosmopolitan: The Unlikely Young Cosmopolitans of Cairo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p403548_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With a nine month ethnographic study as its basis, this paper is looking at the role transnational media flows play in the formation of local, class-specific cosmopolitan identities amongst the lower middle class youth of Cairo. By suggesting that cosmopolitanism should be understood as a form of internal heterogeneity; where through personal strategies and performance the global is made a part of our own local repertoires, this paper is arguing that it is lower middle class Egyptian youth who are more deserving of the cosmopolitan label. Through an intricate integration of Islamic discourse and Islamic media into their daily social practices, members of the lower middle class are engaged in the production of more dynamic cosmopolitanisms based on a happy negotiation between both local and global repertoires. Such unpredictable forms of cosmopolitanism are created through exclusion and belonging within different spaces of the city and media practice.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9347 words || 
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3. Bogan, Rachel. "I’m Not Queer or Undocumented, I’m Both: Rethinking the Undocuqueer's Multiple-Marginalized Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1008698_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What it means to be queer and undocumented in the United States is shifting. In part, this change is due to the increasing legal recognition of same-sex marriage and immigration reform, such as the renewal of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. A group of queer and undocumented activists—undocuqueers—are using their experiences as members of at least two marginalized groups to fight for immigrant and LGBTQ rights.

Despite their growing visibility, undocuqueers are underrepresented in sexualities and immigration research. Work that focuses on their subjectivity presents undocuqueers as homogenous subjects who are living “single issue lives” (Cardenas 2007). My paper addresses these gaps by examining how undocuqueers work to claim multiple identities, including non-normative sexuality, undocumented status and race. I suggest moving away from treating sexuality and immigration status as mutually exclusive entities—and instead I position queerness, undocumented status and race as constructing and constraining the reproduction of the undocuqueer’s identity.

Based on the analysis of six undocuqueers’ online narratives, I examine the intricacies and complexities of being undocumented, queer and non-white. In particular, I study the undocuqueer’s subjectivity as an effect of two contexts: the local (home, school and work) and the global (social, cultural and legal). In contrast with the current literature, I find that undocuqueers’ identification processes are non-linear and their visibility as undocumented and queer mutually inform one other. Unlike subjects who are either queer or undocumented, undocuqueers identify in larger, and often more marginalized, spaces of exclusion.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 528 words || 
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4. Edwards, Gena. "Ucwalmicw emhám smukws ecw7úcwalmicw metsásq̓etem zewátet.s cin̓ qan̓ím̓ts ptéla7 le̓xlaxs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, Mar 25, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1353090_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Native people are capable of keeping their traditional knowledge through language by blood memory and location

According to Indigenous knowledge and blood memory knowing your location defines who you are as an Indigenous person. This includes physical, mental, emotional and spiritual positions. Location of knowing one’s self and experience is important when working with Indigenous peoples. When an Indigenous academic recognizes and reclaims their location and background productivity is more successful using Indigenous methodologies and pedagogy.

Kwik’s Tina7 will acknowledge, explore and explain through a St’at’imc interactive talking circle with the use of traditional language and medicines during this workshop.

This will demonstrate the importance of knowing, understanding and acknowledging Indigenous location for academic purposes in research methods while utilizing protocols and traditional value systems.

Colonization has attempted to change Indigenous knowledge and pedagogy through assimilation. Indigenous knowledge can be traced for time of immemorial through blood memory because language, songs, oral stories, land indicators and training keep Indigenous theories successful today.

Decolonization makes Indigenous knowledge interdisciplinary for academic researchers because they/we have to walk in two worlds; one being the traditional with unwritten protocols, specific methods, blood memory and the other having modern systems of methodologies, paradigms and language.

This workshop will bring awareness to (traditional) knowledge keepers/makers through a interactive circle demonstrating Indigenous epistemology through blood memory while acknowledging traditional lands of the indigenous peoples through St’at’imc practices.

This workshop will be delivered in a circle of the presenter and all participants as St’at’imc people share through a circular module representing continuum of learning as a circle has no end. The circle is usually done sitting on the ground to symbolize each person’s connection mother earth, if there are participants unable to sit on the floor/ground the whole group will use chairs. In St’at’imc culture no one person is left out.

The Presenter will start the circle with a pipe ceremony asking to bless the traditional territory and people then each participant within the circle. This will be done in the St’at’imc language.

The presenter will then give history of how the St’at’imc people have been and are researched profusely in the academic world having their values and protocols often disregarded or disrespected due to lack of understanding or knowledge of traditional St’at’imc ways.

Presenter will acknowledge and recognize the first ever documented researcher in the St’at’imc territory because it through their work some of the customs, traditions and language would be lost through the assimilation process. Presenter will then give a synopsis of the colonization in Canada from time the first researcher started their work to present day. This will be done to demonstrate the importance of research today and the relevance to understand traditional protocols of all Indigenous people who are being inquired.

Presenter will then speak of Indigenous blood memory and how this term is being accepted in the academic worlds when it pertains to knowledge.

The circle will then close with a feather or rock being passed around the circle to each participant stating in 20 words or less how they can contribute to utilizing Indigenous methodologies and or epistemologies their future academic research.

The presenter will then close the circle with a traditional St’at’imc song and a question period.

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