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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Harvey, Brenna. "I'm Straight, I'm Thinking About Girls, and I'm Masturbating: Masculinity, Pornography, and Doing Gender" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1121129_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Theorizing the relationship between pornography and heterosexual men's investment in and enactment of hegemonic masculine practice—particularly overt sexism, the objectification of women, and violence against women—is longstanding and fraught territory in feminist research and activism. Drawing on interactional and post-structural theories of gender, I attempt to move beyond binary debates about whether or not pornography impacts heterosexual men's gender ideology or sexual practice to argue that pornography has a much more complex relationship to individual men's accomplishment of gender. Drawing on 15 in-depth life history interviews asking subjects to narrate their experiences of sexual learning, this article attempts to link debates about pornography to theories of gender, particularly theories of multiple masculinities. I argue not that pornography use has a direct causal relationship to gender outcomes, but that pornography use can become implicated in gender outcomes where pornography use and preferences are believed by individual men to signify inadequate or failed masculinity. I argue that where subjects did not feel their pornography use had any bearing on adequate or inadequate gender accomplishment, they experienced a greater security in departing from normative masculine forms over the life course, resulting in more egalitarian and pro-feminist gender ideology and sex practice. Where pornography use contributed to anxieties about inadequate or failed masculinity, subjects became more invested in the performance of normative masculinity and exhibited greater reluctance to depart from normative masculine forms over the life course. Implications for the maintenance of unequal gender relations are discussed.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10726 words || 
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2. Elsayed, Heba. "I'm Egyptian, I'm Muslim, But I'm Also Cosmopolitan: The Unlikely Young Cosmopolitans of Cairo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p403548_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With a nine month ethnographic study as its basis, this paper is looking at the role transnational media flows play in the formation of local, class-specific cosmopolitan identities amongst the lower middle class youth of Cairo. By suggesting that cosmopolitanism should be understood as a form of internal heterogeneity; where through personal strategies and performance the global is made a part of our own local repertoires, this paper is arguing that it is lower middle class Egyptian youth who are more deserving of the cosmopolitan label. Through an intricate integration of Islamic discourse and Islamic media into their daily social practices, members of the lower middle class are engaged in the production of more dynamic cosmopolitanisms based on a happy negotiation between both local and global repertoires. Such unpredictable forms of cosmopolitanism are created through exclusion and belonging within different spaces of the city and media practice.

2012 - LRA 62nd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1861 words || 
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3. Storm, Scott., Judson, Rebekah. and Anderson, Diane. ""When I'm Code-Switching, I'm Becoming:" Students Examine Code-Switching and Identity in an Urban, High School, English Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 62nd Annual Conference, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, CA, Nov 28, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578383_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9232 words || 
Info
4. Cox, Jenean. "I'm White and I'm a Lady: Experiences with U.S. Visas for Higher Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006602_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While the field of immigration studies has scholarship that addresses a variety of issues ranging from theories of international migration, adaptation of immigrants, and economic, social, and political responses to immigration, there has been little examination of an initial aspect of the immigration process: the visa for higher education which is the focus of this paper. We analyze whether and how highly skilled immigrants perceive prejudice or discrimination during the U.S. visa application process and how they may differ by gender, nationality, and social economic status. Drawing on qualitative interviews with twenty-six international students at a large research-I university in the U.S., we examine experiences during the students’ most recent visa application process. We discern four main themes in our data: The “Good” Immigrant, Influence of Culture; Navigating/Negotiating Visa Approval; and The Merit-Based “Golden Ticket.” Our analysis show that participants utilize the term ‘culture’ to describe all experiences including that which is subtly discriminatory. The definitions of culture went beyond racial, ethnic, and national boundaries and also included religion, language, gender, social economic status, and political beliefs. The diverse ways interviewees interpreted their cultural backgrounds indicates how racial and ethnic categories are culturally defined and how these definitions and expectations may change across national borders. These categories may not always be explicit to the interviewee, and are instead imbedded in descriptions of what are considered normal customs of exchange in each interviewee’s country of origin.

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