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2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 583 words || 
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1. Vickers, Edward Anthony. "Education, identity and the politics of Hong Kong-mainland and Taiwan-mainland relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p976521_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hong Kong’s ‘Umbrella Revolution’ of autumn 2014 has brought to global attention the gulf in trust and sentiment dividing many Hongkongers from mainland Chinese – a gulf especially pronounced amongst young people educated since the 1997 retrocession. The profound alienation from the mainland of its young people is something that Hong Kong today shares with Taiwan. In exploring this phenomenon comparatively, this paper attempts to elucidate the role of education in identity formation in contemporary Chinese societies on both sides of the Taiwan Strait.

Superficially, Hong Kong and Taiwan are entities that share much in common – at least as seen from the mainland. Both are represented as parts of Chinese territory ‘from time immemorial’ illegitimately detached during the humiliating encounter with Western and Japanese imperialism. Both have been granted (or offered, in the case of Taiwan) special autonomy under the ‘one country, two systems’ formula. And both have experienced, during the past thirty years, an upsurge in local identity consciousness that rejects assertions of a homogenous ‘Chineseness’, complicating efforts to draw them back into the motherland’s embrace.

But how similar in fact are the tensions over identity that bedevil Taiwanese and Hongkongese relations with mainland China? This paper compares the politics of identity in both societies, looking in particular at the historical narratives that have underpinned the rise of Taiwanese ‘nativism’ and Hongkongese localism. It also discusses how Hong Kong and Taiwan are typically portrayed in orthodox accounts of national history on the mainland (e.g. in school texts and museums), and how these portrayals relate to the prospects of reconciliation between Hongkongers, Taiwanese and mainlanders. Also considered are the ways in which increasing economic integration and cross-border traffic seem to be affecting relations between these distinct Chinese societies.

Central to Beijing’s strategy for bringing Taiwan and Hong Kong back into the national fold has been the assumption that where economics leads, hearts and minds will follow. However, in neither society does this so far appear to have been the case – quite the opposite. On one level, this is reflected in the ineffectiveness of clumsy recent attempts by the mainland or local authorities to use traditional media, such as the school curriculum, to deliver old-style ‘one China’ propaganda. But at a more profound level, economic integration has accentuated stratification within each society, thereby stoking resentment against affluent, privileged ‘outsiders’ and local elites alike. This phenomenon is by no means unique to Chinese societies, although the history and politics of Taiwan’s and Hong Kong’s relationships with the mainland gives it a peculiar twist in each case.

The Hong Kong case arguably illustrates the diminishing importance of schooling relative to other sources of knowledge, or other vehicles of socialization, such as social media. More fundamentally, the failure of ‘national education’ in Hong Kong today – like that of the prolonged Chinese nationalist propaganda campaign to which Taiwan was subjected under Martial Law – is attributable to a lack of engagement with social reality as lived and experienced by young people. In order to work, any hegemonic project must, at least to a certain extent, follow the grain of popular sentiment, offering a narrative from which its targets can derive a sense of enhanced status and dignity. The narrative of monolithic Chinese patriotism simply fails to do this in Hong Kong, Taiwan and other societies on China’s periphery. The stability not just of Beijing's relations with these regions, but also of mainland society itself, thus perhaps requires a radical recasting of official discourse on the meanings of 'Chineseness' itself.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 43 words || 
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2. Nebl, James. "The Reintegration of Hong Kong into Mainland China and It’s Effects upon Democratization" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p364420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In the year 1997, the United Kingdom officially ceded control of Hong Kong over to the People’s Republic of China (PRC), establishing Hong Kong as a Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the PRC. Being distinguished as a SAR gives Hong Kong a fifty

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 225 words || 
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3. Liu, Haiyan. "Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement and Criminalization in the US, Taiwan and Mainland, China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236066_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Intellectual property is becoming one of the most valuable and powerful assets in the increasingly privatized global economy. Globalization, technological advances, the Internet and e-commerce have made intellectual property (IP) infringements an escalating and pervasive issue in both developed countries such as the US and developing countries/regions such as Taiwan and mainland China. However, due to local interests, agency priorities, different levels of economic development and different enforcement structures, the US, Taiwan and mainland China enforce the similar IP laws on the books very differently in action.

First, this paper intends to portrait a general picture of IPR enforcement mechanisms in the US, Taiwan and mainland China, and to estimate the proportions of IPR infringements handled by three major enforcement systems: the criminal judicial system, the civil judicial system and the administrative system. Then it focuses the attention on criminal judicial systems specifically. It analyzes the different roles criminal courts play in handling IPR infringements in the three regions. The different roles of criminal courts include: to facilitate governmental policies, to enforce the criminal law, to protect the fairness of the system, to punish or to deter serious infringers, and to bring compensation to victims. The study implicates that apart from conventional jurisprudential wisdom, criminal courts could serve vastly different functions in handling economic crimes in countries/regions with different political regimes, legal structures and cultures.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 7078 words || 
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4. Du, Juana. "Factors contributing to cross-cultural adaptation of mainland postgraduates in Hong Kong: A dynamic model (Top Student Paper)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298569_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although sharing the same cultural heritage, Hong Kong and mainland China have distinct political governance systems and approaches resulted in very different social ideology, which impacts on communication between Hong Kong people and mainland Chinese as a difficult issue. In this study, the adaptation of mainland Chinese postgraduate students to Hong Kong is investigated based on the dynamic model of cognitive/affect/behavior components. Both institutional factors focusing on college impact and cultural elements are taken into account.

This study provides further support for this dynamic framework and most proposed relationships in the model are confirmed. Results show that, cross-cultural awareness (cognitive) and cultural empathy (affective) both have facilitated academic integration and social interaction (behavior). The positive role of additive bilingualism and the moderator role of mass media usage in cross-cultural adaptation are supported and formative.

2010 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 100 words || 
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5. Zhang, Yi (Charlie). "A Utopian Fairyland Crossing Gender and Sexual Lines: An Empirical Study of Dan Mei Culture in Mainland China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, CO, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p428383_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Findings show that though crossing the (homo/hetero)sexual line with traditional laudatory discourses of homosexuality, the informants reinforce the gendered line of sexuality by excluding lesbians. Hybridity, a thermometer of social changes, is found in their gender identity and cultural products. Fluidity of gender and sexual identities is revealed in their socializing process. By romanticizing male homosexuality, they challenge hetero-conjugal relationships corrupted by the globalizing capitalism. By correlating feminized bodies with desirable masculinity, fans disrupt the unity of heteronormative gender ideology and appropriate men’s symbolic power. By reconstructing traditional soft masculinity, they resist the transnational hegemony of reproduction of Anglo-American masculinity.

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