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2019 - 15th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 130 words || 
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1. Culp, Robert. "Maintaining A Critical Voice in A Devalued Profession While Maintaining Myself" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 15, 2019 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1491154_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this session is to discuss my developing autoethnography that explores my struggle and experiences with trying to desperately be the critical educator and scholar that I believe are needed in education. Using my experiences of fighting to convince my district to implement a truly inclusive curriculum (which should include items such as the voice and perspectives of LGBTQ individuals and tackle current events such as #Blacklivesmatter), my research examines the difficulty of implementing critical education due to the impact of globalization and neoliberalism and the devaluing of educators in our institutions and society. Most importantly, this autoethnography challenges me to question how and if I can stay in education and attempt to transform it, without succumbing to the dominating and oppressive culture of the institution.

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 302 words || 
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2. Canela, Elizabeth. "Inequality Maintained by Stories of an “Underclass”: Media's Role in Merging Race, Class, and Gender with Poverty; Maintaining Inequalities; and Potential Places of Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p560671_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: Before the Occupy Movement, Bob Herbert’s last opinion piece in the New York Times stated “in 2009, the richest 5 percent claimed 63.5 percent of the nation’s wealth. The overwhelming majority, the bottom 80 percent, collectively held just 12.8 percent” (“Losing Our Way”). This structure benefits those at the top and ironically, everyone continues to maintain it. The focus of this paper is not only the eighty percent of the nation (although needing its own attention), but also the groups of people underneath the poverty line, on welfare, who are part of the “welfare state.” This paper particularly focuses on those living within the American “welfare state” in 2005 and 2006 focusing on the treatment of people in New Orleans before, during, and after Hurricane Katrina killed and displaced thousands of people.
Six years later, the sentiments of outrage toward the government’s perceived lack of response are seldom expressed. Instead, popular media revert to blaming those who did not evacuate and labeling many as looters, criminals, and segments of the society liable to destroy the rest of the morally upright American population. These tropes are undoubtedly connected to racialized and gendered notions associated with poverty. This response is representative of many historical depictions of the poor in America that are replicated in law, politics, comedies, and the like. I explore the interconnectedness of media and perception as it relates to the poorest in the nation through the images and testimonies of Hurricane Katrina victims, overall welfare debates, and more currently with the Occupy Movements. I argue that a spectacle like Hurricane Katrina is not only blackened through problematic conflations of poverty and race, but also that conceptions expand across national boarders and create interesting so-called Third World misconceptions of backwardness within a national terrain.

2007 - American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Words: 47 words || 
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3. Jeep, John., Reynolds, John., Davidheiser, James. and Horwege, Ronald. "German Honorary Delta Phi Alpha: Getting Started, Maintaining Success" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX, Nov 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p174474_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Presentation
Abstract: The National German Honorary Delta Phi Alpha recognizes academic achievement in German Studies at the post-secondary level. This session outlines the history of the Honorary, describes the process for becoming -- or revising -- a chapter, and provides ideas for successful programming. Details of scholarship opportunities included.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 2 pages || Words: 2222 words || 
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4. Murphy, Phil. "Models, Methods, and Stereotypes: Efforts to Maintain, Reify, and Create Macedonia's Ethno-Political Identities and How Research Can Move beyond Them" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p208782_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: There is a small but growing literature that focuses on the various ethno-political identities and cultures within Macedonia. For the most part, these works occupy one of four general categories: the sharp focus on western models and stereotypes (e.g. primordial divisions, nationalism, ‘Balkanization’); generalized deductive research; attempts at retrospective creation or justification of identity; and attempts to move beyond earlier assumptions. This research outlines the models, methods, and stereotypes that have been applied to Macedonia’s politics and identities to date and then adds to the last category by presenting a cognitive network approach to better understanding the political dynamics of this post-Communist society.
Contemporary scholars and practitioners from both in- and outside of the region frequently rely on the assumption that ethnicity is the major driving issue in Macedonia’s political behavior. While, superficially, this appears to be a difficult concept to dismiss, newer research into Balkan politics is beginning to move beyond the oftentimes simplistic realm of ethnic cleavages and is beginning to consider more of the actual richness and complexity that characterizes the region. The fundamental task of this research was to probe for the cognitive frameworks employed by Macedonia’s individual and collective political identities. In so doing, popular assumptions were set aside wherever possible in order to take a fresh look at the various identities developing in this relatively new republic.
Rather than begin to define the constructs and comparisons in use from the state or community level and extrapolate downward, this research instead begins at the individual level in order to elicit the components of the comparison structures that comprise individual actors’ frameworks and then extrapolate upward, to the society level. The repertory grid method (Kelly 1955) provides respondents with an opportunity make evaluations on their own terms, using their own comparative constructs, and differentiating quantitatively between the elements they are evaluating. Rather than ask a respondent to rate decision elements in terms that are meaningful to the researcher’s theoretical framework, the respondent is instead asked to provide his or her own theoretical framework and use that to differentiate between the events or personalities in question. Resulting frameworks can then be employed to evaluate how individuals in a group actually differ or agree in their perceptions of the same stimuli. Groups can be delineated into clusters based on perceptual similarities.
This approach was verified with a nationwide survey based on the original interviews. Resulting frameworks were analyzed and used to test current models of identity that are commonly employed by scholars and practitioners from both in- and outside of the region. Such models are characterized by their reliance on ethnicity to explain political behavior and societal divisions there. What resulted was a demonstration of the shortcomings inherent in the ethnic divisions model and the potential for this type of inquiry in becoming a valuable aid to our understanding how identity and perception relate to macro-level behavior in Macedonia and elsewhere.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6572 words || 
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5. Nieckarz, Peter. "Community in Cyber Space?: The Role of the Internet in Facilitating and Maintaining an Online Community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106772_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The interactions based around the taping, trading, and collecting of live music performances has evolved into a phenomenon that can aptly be referred to as a community. What is most remarkable about this is that the vast majority of these activities now take place over the Internet. This social phenomenon exhibits all the characteristics found in other, more traditional, communities that are maintained through regular face-to-face interaction. This paper is a participant observation that specifically addresses how trading is indeed a community, and demonstrates how this is facilitated through the proliferation of the Internet and other technologies. More generally, the social dynamics of the Internet has ramifications that may go far beyond the practice of trading live recordings and is affecting society on a more pervasive level. The emergence of cyber-structure is aptly addressed by sociological theories that predate the popular emergence of the Internet, particularly Georg Simmel and Anthony Giddens.

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