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Showing 1 through 5 of 1,154 records.
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2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 10155 words || 
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1. Kofinis, Chris. and Belt, Todd. "The End of the Long Major Power War? Understanding and Preparing for the Emerging Major Power Challenge to America?s Dominant Position within the International System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65659_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Patel, Visha., Schleifer, Cyrus. and Brauer, Simon. "Gender Ideology and College Majors: Exploring how Different College Majors Pattern Gender Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254200_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Past research has established that educated individuals are more equalitarian, but less is known how different types of college education may produce variations in gender ideology. Using the General Social Survey and a series of multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) models, we address the question: “Do patterns of gender ideology vary among those who have completed different types of college majors?” We find that those with an Education or Health degree show the most egalitarian rates of gender ideology while those with a Natural Sciences or Math/Engineering/Computer Science degree show the lowest rates. Our findings highlight a difference within majors by gender, including the more egalitarian attitudes of males compared to their female counterparts within the Education major. We also discover a cumulative effect of education by examining those with a graduate degree. We conclude with a discussion of our findings’ implications and the importance of selection into certain fields.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 179 words || 
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3. Osborn, Tracy. and Schilling, Emily. "Majority of the Majority: Integrating Critical Mass and Party Control" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1128947_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When applying critical mass theory to legislatures, early researchers first posited a connection between the proportion of women in the legislative chamber and changes in “how women legislate.” In particular, they argued that as the proportion of women in the chamber increases, so will the number of women’s issue bill introductions and the prioritization of women’s issues. Evidence for the effect of critical mass is mixed, especially when considering the partisan diversity that exists among women. Political party differences are particularly relevant in explaining the ways in which women choose to either pursue or not pursue women’s issues legislation (Osborn 2012; Swers 2002; Reingold 2000).
In this paper, we consider the effect of critical mass in the context of legislative parties. We argue that a critical mass among women within the majority party, where women hold a “majority of the majority,” will facilitate women’s pursuit of a women’s issues agenda. We use bill introductions across a variety of state legislatures with varying proportions of women in the majority party to test our theory.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 6 pages || Words: 314 words || 
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4. Hammond, Thomas. "Who Most Influences the Majority Opinion on the U.S. Supreme Court: Evaluating the Median-of-the-Majority-Coalition Hypothesis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p266085_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In recent years a debate has arisen over which justice most influences the content of a majority opinion on the U.S. Supreme Court. One possible answer is that the author of the majority opinion most influences its content, at least insofar as he can attract majority support for his opinion. An alternative answer, symbolized by references to “the swing justice” on the Court, is that the median justice most influences the content of the majority opinion: if she declines to support the draft majority opinion, no matter who is writing it, the opinion cannot become a majority opinion. Both of these arguments have received substantial attention in the recent literature on Supreme Court decision-making. But a third possible answer that has also been advanced is that the median justice in the majority coalition most influences the content of the majority opinion. That is, for those justices who were on the majority side on the “conference vote” held soon after oral arguments on a case, the resulting opinion will be written so as to appeal to the median member of this group. Here we subject this “median of the majority coalition” hypothesis to systematic analysis. The conclusion is that the hypothesis, and the existing efforts to test it empirically, suffer from several logical deficiencies, including a contradiction between two of its major premises. It is thus unlikely that the hypothesis offers an adequate explanation of the process by which Supreme Court opinions are written and adopted.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 12 pages || Words: 2594 words || 
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5. Brunner, Brigitta R.. and Fitch-Hauser, Margaret. "I’m a people person!: A look at public relations majors’ perceptions of the major and their first jobs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p271458_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This research examines how and why student pick public relations as their major and what expectations they have of their first job. All division and department chairs of colleges and universities, which had public relations majors and that were listed in the AEJMC Directory were asked to take part in this survey. One hundred and forty-three institutions were contacted. A total of 180 surveys were returned.
Some major findings were that most respondents stated that they had picked public relations as a major because they liked to plan events and because they liked people. Most respondents reported that they had taken or were required to take the courses recommended by the Commission on Public Relations Education. In addition, most of the respondents who had interned did so at non-profit organizations and were not paid for their internship. Participants seemed to have realistic expectations for starting salaries, and stated that they wanted to obtain employment at agencies, corporations, and non-profits.

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