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2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 245 words || 
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1. Nagaike, Kazumi. "Male Desires and Hopes to “Become” Fudanshi (“rotten men”): Heterosexual Male Readings of Male-Male Romance Fiction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1102109_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The BL (Boys’ Love) genre, which features male-male romance narratives and eroticism mainly targeted at female readers, has been widely acknowledged, both in Japan and abroad, as a significant component of Japanese popular culture. Though previous BL studies have often concluded that BL works are mostly produced by and for women, as I have suggested elsewhere (Nagaike, 2015), in Japan there are also many male BL readers (termed fudanshi, or “rotten men”), including self-identified heterosexuals. This necessitates a recognition of the discursive queerness entailed in heterosexual male readings of male homosexual narratives such as BL. Based primarily on ethnographic research concerning Japanese heterosexual BL readers’ communities and communications, this paper attempts to unveil both the psychological orientation of fudanshi, as well as their physicality (e.g. genital-arousal, masturbation, physical relationship with others) in relation to the consumption of BL narratives. I will demonstrate a psychological (subconscious) male desire for self-feminization, aligned with a temptation felt by many men to subvert or negate the construction of a strong, masculine ego. An analysis of these fudanshi’s reading practices also contributes to the critical discussion concerning the ways in which such aspects of male physicality relate to the components of men’s “real” lives, as well as to prevalent social constructions of masculinity. Hence, how and why self-identified heterosexual male readers of BL subvert the established idealization of “successful masculine salaryman” (Dasgupta, 2013) should be analyzed as a means to encompass the individuality of desire within contemporary Japanese socio-cultural contexts.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 200 words || 
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2. Myers, III, Wade. "Characteristics of Male on Male Juvenile Sexual Homicide" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432031_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Limited information exists for on male on male (homosexual) sexual homicide, and especially so for juvenile offenders less than 18. This study examines prevalence, weapon use, victim-offender relationship, victim age categories, and racial variations for these crimes. Data for this study was derived from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) Supplementary Homicide Reports (SHR) for the years 1976 through 2005. This data set is considered representative for United States homosexual juvenile sexual murders given it is based on law enforcement agency reporting from across the country and spans 30 years. Just 88 cases were found out of 597,351 SHR homicide cases, indicating the rarity of this homicide type. An average of three of these crimes occurred annually. Offender age ranged from 12-17, and offenses steadily increased with age. Most offenders were White (70%) and killed adult victims (62%), although all victim age categories were represented: children (17%), adolescents (13%), elderly (8%). Generally victims were acquaintances (41%) or strangers (36%), and were killed by contact/edged weapons (40%) or firearms (39%). A number of racial differences were found, including Black offenders being significantly more likely to kill White victims. A case presentation will be included to highlight the nature of these crimes.

2013 - LRA 63rd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1943 words || 
Info
3. McVee, Mary., Fronzak, David., Stainsby, Jay. and White, Chad. "White Male Teachers Exploring Language, Literacy, and Diversity: A Self-Study of Male Perceptions of Diversity(ies)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 63rd Annual Conference, Omni Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Dec 04, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p663693_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 8810 words || 
Info
4. Zichermann, Sandra. "Metrosexual Masculinity, Stereotypical Images of the ‘Ideal’ and the Objectification and Commodification of Male models in the Bravo Reality Television Series—Manhunt: The Search for America’s Most Gorgeous Male Model." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93956_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The media has socially constructed images of ideal beauty—from Barbie and Ken to Marilyn Monroe, Twiggy, and the current television and film stars of today. The only constant has been that beauty is still viewed as important in having friends, in being popular, and in succeeding in today’s competitive fashion/beauty marketplace.

Much research has been conducted about the negative portrayals of women in fashion magazines, commercials, televisions shows, and films. Women’s images have been used over the years to sell products and services (for example, Virginia Slims cigarettes, Maidenform lingerie). Indeed, women’s bodies have been toyed with and altered by the fashion magazines, advertising agencies, and beauty corporations to create different images that will be idealized by the public. Thus, the media have played a huge role in creating, formulating, and executing “what is fashionable” and what is “popular” through the objectification and commodification of women and women’s bodies.
Introduction.

This analysis will deal with the same ideology, but it will uncover how bodies are gendered and, specifically, how men and men’s bodies are being objectified and commodified in order to sell products, services, and images of the ideal to the consumer. This is definitely not a new phenomenon but, with the rise and intense popularity of reality television as a culture phenomenon, men are taking on new roles and responsibilities that were once deemed specifically female roles (such as modeling).

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6827 words || 
Info
5. Carpenter, Laura. and Kettrey, Heather. "Missing Discourse of Male Desire? Sexuality Frames in News on Male Circumcision and Female Genital Cutting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-10-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411882_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyzes print news coverage of female genital cutting (FGC) and male circumcision (MC) in the United States, 1985-2006. Using a sample of 601 news items from four national and three regional newspapers and three national news magazines, we examine themes of sexual desire and pleasure that surround discussions of FGC and MC. Activists concerned with both issues frequently emphasize issues related to sexuality. However, in print news coverage, references to desire and pleasure are much more prevalent surrounding FGC than MC (though still relatively rare). Journalists routinely present FGC as negatively affecting female sexual pleasure but rarely mention MC’s relationship to pleasure; in doing so, they effectively engage in secondary claims-making on anti-FGC activists’ behalf while deflecting anti-MC activists’ concerns. This pattern stands in dramatic contrast to the dominant sexual script (the “missing discourse of desire”) privileging male pleasure and neglecting its female counterpart. These tendencies appear to stem from journalistic practices (especially the news values of drama and human interest); cultural understandings of gendered and raced sexuality (who is conceivable as a victim); and the intersections of gender, race, nationality, and sexuality in the popular (and journalistic) imagination.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

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