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2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 245 words || 
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1. Nagaike, Kazumi. "Male Desires and Hopes to “Become” Fudanshi (“rotten men”): Heterosexual Male Readings of Male-Male Romance Fiction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1102109_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The BL (Boys’ Love) genre, which features male-male romance narratives and eroticism mainly targeted at female readers, has been widely acknowledged, both in Japan and abroad, as a significant component of Japanese popular culture. Though previous BL studies have often concluded that BL works are mostly produced by and for women, as I have suggested elsewhere (Nagaike, 2015), in Japan there are also many male BL readers (termed fudanshi, or “rotten men”), including self-identified heterosexuals. This necessitates a recognition of the discursive queerness entailed in heterosexual male readings of male homosexual narratives such as BL. Based primarily on ethnographic research concerning Japanese heterosexual BL readers’ communities and communications, this paper attempts to unveil both the psychological orientation of fudanshi, as well as their physicality (e.g. genital-arousal, masturbation, physical relationship with others) in relation to the consumption of BL narratives. I will demonstrate a psychological (subconscious) male desire for self-feminization, aligned with a temptation felt by many men to subvert or negate the construction of a strong, masculine ego. An analysis of these fudanshi’s reading practices also contributes to the critical discussion concerning the ways in which such aspects of male physicality relate to the components of men’s “real” lives, as well as to prevalent social constructions of masculinity. Hence, how and why self-identified heterosexual male readers of BL subvert the established idealization of “successful masculine salaryman” (Dasgupta, 2013) should be analyzed as a means to encompass the individuality of desire within contemporary Japanese socio-cultural contexts.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 216 words || 
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2. Straus, Murray. "Assaults by Women on Male Partners in 30 Male-Dominant Nations: What Explains the Paradox?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516454_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over 200 studies, mostly in Euro-American nations, found about the same percent of women as men physically assault marital and dating partners. Two types of data were used to investigate whether the similar assault rates apply in highly male-dominant socieites. First, 30 published studies of male-dominant nations found partner assault rates by women of 3%-to-49% (30 nation mean-23%) and by men 6%-to-66% (mean-28%). Thus, almost as many women as men in highly male-dominant nations assaulted. One explanation is self-defense, but evidence for 11 male-dominant nations, together with evidence from many other nations suggests that self-defense explains only a small percent of the assaults by either women or men. A second explanation is that the high rate of female assaults in male-dominant nations, like the high rate of male assaults, reflects the high level of punitiveness and violence in those nations. This was tested using data from 32 nations which varied from equliatrian to male-dominant. Results using four measures of societal violence (national rates of homicide, violence approval, violent socialization, and legality of corporal punishment in families, schools, judicial punishment, and prisions,) found that the more violent the nation the higher the percent of women who assaulted a partner. Implications for theories of violence against women are discussed.

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 352 words || 
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3. Wilson, Michael. "The Real Housewives of Atlanta: Propagating Black Male Stereotypes While Enforcing White Male Supremacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p570472_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The series “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” has become an ambiguously popular and powerful show in the genre of Reality Television. Many critics, entertainment personalities and scholars have critiqued and criticized, while others have praised “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” for its depiction of African American woman, as these images compare and contrast with overall Black woman characters and imagery on nationally syndicated television. Little however has been discussed on the portrayals of men on the show. Though significant arguments can be presented to support the problematic depiction of Black woman on this show, as we begin to deconstruct image packaging of both Black and white males, another issue arises that further complicates the discussion. As a result of this deconstruction, “The Real Housewives of Atlanta” can be seen as a vehicle for perpetuating both historic black male stereotypes as well as white male supremist imagery.
This paper will focus on the depiction of Black men as they compare with white male imagery on “The Real Housewives of Atlanta.” As we look at the image packaging of Black men within this series, we will see consistent representative themes of Black males in parental, marital, professional and sexual identification roles. However, as we analyze the image packaging of white males we see a completely different image as white males are viewed as financial providers and supporters, good fathers, and potential husbands. These depictions covertly establish relationships where both Black and White women have become dependent on the image of white male patriarch. As this compares with negative depictions of black males, the television show has successfully created a White patriarchal hegemonic structure. These images can be very problematic due to this television show being labeled as “reality Television,” in addition to the show displaying examples Black female independence and success. If this is “reality television” it actualizes these stereotypical roles of Black man as they compare with white men. If this is a positive display of Black womanhood and Black female independence, it has very troubling suggestions as to the relationship of this independence with the Black male figure.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1449 words || 
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4. Smart, Bobbi-Lee. "An Analysis of Male Exotic Dancers and Male Strip Clubs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707839_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The location of male revues and strip clubs, the dancers' performances, and the types of audience interaction between male dancers and their customers, are closely tied to race and class. The purpose of this paper is to explain how race, class, and location intersect in male strip clubs and revue shows. Nagel (2003) explains that race, class, and sexuality are closely tied together in American society and that these ties lead to sexual divisions based on race and class. Fung (1991) explains that while the standard of male beauty is still White men, the Black male is reduced to his penis. He explains that Black men and women are seen as hypersexual, thus making them a sexual threat. The methods used to understand these relationships were participant observation and in depth qualitative interviews with current and former male exotic dancers. Results to come.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 160 words || 
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5. Hefner, M. Kristen. "Governing Male Sexuality: Using Queer Theory to Analyze Male Prison Sex" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-05-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574732_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sex and sexuality in prisons have historically been viewed as problematic and needing the attention of policy-makers and prison administration. Correspondingly, current sociological and criminological research on sex in prisons views sex and sexuality as problematic within the prison environment. However, to develop a complete understanding of sex and sexuality within the prison context, we must examine these issues, not as problematic, but as socially constructed phenomena that reflect sex, sexuality, and gender relations within mainstream society. Using in-depth interviews with 14 male prison inmates from two North Carolina prison institutions, this paper seeks to answer the question, how is sexuality organized within the prison environment? More specifically, how does gender shape sexuality in male prison institutions? Drawing on queer theory, the current study problematizes and calls into question the idea of a heterosexual/homosexual binary and finds that the lives of male prison inmates simultaneously maintain and challenge seemingly fixed categories of gender and sexuality.

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